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Monday, November 2
 

9:00am

Charleston Seminar: Acquisitions Bootcamp
REGISTER NOW!

Registration Cost: $225

Presented in conjunction with UNC Chapel Hill School of Library and Information Science. 


This seminar will offer an intensive one and one-half day (all day Monday, half day Tuesday) boot camp on acquisitions from three different perspectives: public services, technical services, and the vendor side.  The major emphasis is on the nuts and bolts of the acquisitions process from selecting materials, especially e-books, to assessing collections and articulating the return on investment to the parent organization (academic/special/public libraries).  Using an interactive hands-on approach, with case studies, small group discussion, and best practices attendees will gain pragmatic knowledge they can apply in their home institutions. This class is ideally suited for librarians new to selection and acquisitions workflows.

Topics:


  • Collection  Management Overview

  • Budgeting

  • Assessing User Needs

  • Selecting Materials

  • Acquisitions Workflows

  • Negotiation Strategies

  • Assessment of Collections

  • Collaboration with other libraries

  • Print Materials

  • Media

  • E-Resources

  • Marketing / Outreach

  • Preservation

  • Legal Issues / Intellectual Freedom

  • Ethics

  • Communication /  Collaboration-Public Services v.s. Tech Services


Speakers
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill
Megan Kilb is the E-Resources Librarian in the University Library's E-Resources & Serials Management Department at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received a B.A. in History from Furman University and her M.S.L.S. from SILS at UNC-Chapel Hill. She's worked in e-resources acquisitions in one capacity or another since 2007.
avatar for Rebecca Vargha

Rebecca Vargha

Head, Information and Library Science Library, School of Information and Library Science, UNC Chapel Hill
Rebecca Vargha is Librarian, School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill since 2001. Her responsibilities as head of this library include collection development, staff supervision, liaison with departmental faculty and the central library, reference and research assistance, and facilities management. She is Faculty Advisor for the SLA Student Group at SILS, Chair-Elect of the Museums, ARts and... Read More →


Monday November 2, 2015 9:00am - Tuesday November 3, 2015 12:00pm
TBA
 
Tuesday, November 3
 

9:00am

An Introduction to Library Research Data Management Services
REGISTER NOW!

Cost: $159 for ALCTS members, $225 for non-members.

Offered in partnership with ALCTS:

Data are a core research output.  Scientific and scholarly communities, research funders, universities, and policy makers are recognizing the importance of and addressing challenges related to organizing, describing, sharing, and preserving borne digital data.  Increasingly, academic libraries and librarians are contributing to efforts to address these challenges.  This panel workshop will offer attendees a thoughtful, interactive, and actionable introduction to building and delivering research data management services.  Attendees will learn about the primary activities and importance of data management across the scholarly lifecycle; the policies, trends, and technologies affecting researchers and the organizations that support them; and, the expertise, staffing, and resources libraries must consider when building successful and sustainable services.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Doty

Jennifer Doty

Research Data Librarian, Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University Robert W. Woodruff Library
Jennifer Doty is the Research Data Librarian in the Scholarly Communications Office of the Robert W. Woodruff Library at Emory University.  She has a BA in Education from the University of Arizona, and a MSI in Library and Information Services with a Graduate Certificate in Spatial Analysis (GIS) from the University of Michigan. Jen's role in Scholarly Communications is to provide data management and curation support and services for... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Eaker

Christopher Eaker

Data Curation Librarian, University of Tennessee
Christopher Eaker is Data Curation Librarian at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Libraries. He is interested in scientific data curation and in integrating sound data stewardship skills into science and engineering curricula. Christopher helps UTK’s researchers navigate federal requirements for data management and sharing and educates researches in the skills needed to manage data well. He holds a bachelor’s degree in... Read More →



Tuesday November 3, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

Charleston Seminar: Acquisitions Bootcamp (Day 2)
This session is a one and one-half day event, running from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm on Monday, 11/2, and from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm on Tuesday, 11/3.

REGISTER NOW!

Registration Cost: $225

Sponsored by ACSESS (Alliance of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Science Societies). Presented in conjunction with UNC Chapel Hill School of Library and Information Science. 


This seminar will offer an intensive one and one-half day (all day Monday, half day Tuesday) boot camp on acquisitions from three different perspectives: public services, technical services, and the vendor side.  The major emphasis is on the nuts and bolts of the acquisitions process from selecting materials, especially e-books, to assessing collections and articulating the return on investment to the parent organization (academic/special/public libraries).  Using an interactive hands-on approach, with case studies, small group discussion, and best practices attendees will gain pragmatic knowledge they can apply in their home institutions. This class is ideally suited for librarians new to selection and acquisitions workflows.

Topics:
  • Collection  Management Overview
  • Budgeting
  • Assessing User Needs
  • Selecting Materials
  • Acquisitions Workflows
  • Negotiation Strategies
  • Assessment of Collections
  • Collaboration with other libraries
  • Print Materials
  • Media
  • E-Resources
  • Marketing / Outreach
  • Preservation
  • Legal Issues / Intellectual Freedom
  • Ethics
  • Communication /  Collaboration-Public Services v.s. Tech Services

Speakers
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill
Megan Kilb is the E-Resources Librarian in the University Library's E-Resources & Serials Management Department at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received a B.A. in History from Furman University and her M.S.L.S. from SILS at UNC-Chapel Hill. She's worked in e-resources acquisitions in one capacity or another since 2007.
avatar for Rebecca Vargha

Rebecca Vargha

Head, Information and Library Science Library, School of Information and Library Science, UNC Chapel Hill
Rebecca Vargha is Librarian, School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill since 2001. Her responsibilities as head of this library include collection development, staff supervision, liaison with departmental faculty and the central library, reference and research assistance, and facilities management. She is Faculty Advisor for the SLA Student Group at SILS, Chair-Elect of the Museums, ARts and... Read More →



9:00am

Charleston Seminar: Legal Issues in Libraries
Beyond Bright Lines:  (or, Things librarians didn't know they need to know about the law, but they really do!)

REGISTER NOW!


Registration Cost: $225

Presented in conjunction with UNC Chapel Hill School of Library and Information Science. 


Librarians are faced with legal issues every day but, without knowing what to look, for it can be easy to miss or misunderstand them.  Conventional wisdom that offers easy answers can be tempting but may provide a false sense of security.  Even worse, by trying to follow rules we don’t really understand, we may unnecessarily impede the library’s ability to do good work.  Through a series of discussions and group activities, this day-long session, will prepare librarians to make informed, thoughtful decisions in key legal areas that are becoming ever more crucial in institutional settings, including:

1.  Information Ownership and Mission.  Who owns instruction-centered materials (syllabi, online courses, student notes, etc.)?  What is the statutory baseline behind licenses?  What about intellectual property beyond (c) - patent, trademark, and tech transfer?  How should we think about what we have vs. what we own - repositories, research data, and meeting funder mandates?

2.  Security, Equal Treatment, and Liability in Libraries.   What are emerging legal standards for safety and freedom from harassment?  What is our employment liability?

3.  Privacy and Disclosure:  How can we come to a better understanding of FERPA, HIPAA, and other regulations?  What's happening about confidentiality and data security?

4.  Accessibility, Lawsuits, and VPATs.  Given ADA, OSHA, and disability requirements, how can we make physical spaces accessible?  In this context, how should we think about websites and other online services?

5.  Horizon Issues and Uncharted Waters, such as makerspaces, data visualization, digital humanities, and others.  How to navigate and keep up with new guidelines, best practices, documents, cases?  What are effective strategies for risk management?

The session will conclude with a summary of issues that will need further follow-up with professionals, and discussion of how that might follow-up may be better achieved. 

Moderators
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Smith

Kevin Smith

Director of Scholarly Communications, Duke University
As Duke University’s first Director of Copyright & Scholarly Communications, Kevin Smith’s principal role is to teach and advise faculty, administrators and students about copyright, intellectual property licensing and scholarly publishing.  He is a librarian and an attorney (admitted to the bar in Ohio and North Carolina) and also holds a graduate degree in religion from Yale University.  At Duke, Kevin serves on the... Read More →


Tuesday November 3, 2015 9:00am - 4:00pm
TBA

1:00pm

Charleston Seminar: Understanding the Library Market
REGISTER NOW!

Registration Cost: $149

Attention publishers and vendors of library-related materials: new for the 2015 Charleston Conference, we have a Charleston Seminar workshop just for you! We’ll discuss how to target libraries that will buy your publications, making your marketing budget effective, improving your understanding of the library market, and using library associations to focus your spending. Learn from veterans in the field how libraries buy, who are the library buyers, and how purchasing decisions are made. You can’t afford to miss out on this workshop focused on the library market at the premier international annual library conference focused on book, serial, and electronic resource acquisition. All the major decision makers will be there, and so should you!


Tuesday November 3, 2015 1:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA
 
Wednesday, November 4
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

9:00am

Assessment and Academic Library Value
Registration Cost: $110

This panel workshop features academic librarians with expertise in assessment and demonstrating value/impact on items of institutional importance. Consisting of representation from a mid-sized regional comprehensive university, doctoral institutions, and a large-scale regional comprehensive, discussion items for this preconference will include ALA’s Assessment in Action program, methods of assessing student learning, and demonstrating library value to university administration. Participants in this hands on workshop session will learn techniques for creating assessment programs at their own institutions, as well as practical advice on setting up and monitoring such a program. 

Moderators
CF

Cris Ferguson

Director of Technical Services, Murray State University

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Donovan

Carrie Donovan

Assistant Dean for Research & Instruction Services, Ferris State University
Carrie Donovan is Assistant Dean for Research & Instruction Services at Ferris State University’s Ferris Library for Information, Technology & Education where she oversees and coordinates the research and teaching functions of the library, as well as the user engagement and user experience-related operations. Carrie’s professional contribution to information literacy and learning assessment is made evident through her publications and... Read More →
AI

Ashley Ireland

Dean, University Libraries, Murray State University
avatar for Adam Murray

Adam Murray

Dean & Associate Professor, James Madison University: Libraries & Educational Technologies
avatar for John Watts

John Watts

Undergraduate Learning Librarian, University of Nevada Las Vegas
John Watts is an Undergraduate Learning Librarian at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where he works with faculty and students to integrate the Libraries into the general education curriculum. He presents and publishes on the topics of creativity in information literacy instruction, student learning outcomes assessment, and peer-assisted learning. He has facilitated workshops on incorporating humor and story into library instruction as well... Read More →


Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

Defining a Discovery Role for Your Library: An Ithaka S+R Workshop on Evidence-Based Decision-Making
Registration Cost: $250 (Discounted rate of $125 available for Ithaka S+R Survey Participants)

Discovery is a core library activity that has changed dramatically in recent years. Search has moved well beyond the library catalog and A&I services to include not only consumer offerings and index-based discovery services. And traditional techniques for maintaining current awareness of the research literature are giving way to a variety of personalized anticipatory services.  It is a good moment for libraries to take stock of accomplishments and to ensure that wise investments are being made in support of a realistic vision for the library’s changing role, as Roger Schonfeld argued in a recent Ithaka S+R issue brief.

In this workshop, Roger will help academic and research librarians grapple with how to make strong decisions about the library’s role in support of discovery at their institutions.

Topics will include:

* Using evidence to grapple with how the library’s discovery role is changing

* Developing organizational structures and decision-making frameworks for making effective decisions about the library’s vision for its discovery role

* How to balance collaborations and vendor contributions against the need to have a solution that works best for your institution

Participants will benefit from this workshop by improving their ability to incorporate evidence into decision-making processes about the library’s role in discovery.

Prior to the event, we will ask all registrants to complete a worksheet enabling us to maximize the value of our time working together in person.

Speakers

Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

Developing a Weighted Collection Development Allocation Formula
Registration Cost: $110

This practical workshop is geared toward librarians who are looking for ways to optimize their limited collection development budgets and/or are revisiting their allocation procedures with an eye toward distributing funds more equitably to each subject area.

Bailey and Creibaum will address the process of creating a weighted allocation formula similar to the one used at Arkansas State University and will introduce attendees to the skills and resources used in managing their own Excel spreadsheet-based allocation formula.

The use of weights applied to each factor is a central feature of this formula. Factors can include the number of degrees awarded in each program, departmental semester credit hour production, the number of faculty in each department, and the average cost of resources in each discipline, among others.

Participants who bring their tablets or laptops will be able to download and work with a fully functioning “lite” version of the Excel formula during the session.

The presenters will demonstrate how the basic formula can be modified to utilize the criteria relevant to each institution. Real-time examples will be used to show how seemingly small changes in the formula can produce major changes in results.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Bailey

Jeff Bailey

Library Director, Arkansas State University
A native of Dayton, Ohio, Jeff Bailey was appointed Director of the Dean B. Ellis Library of Arkansas State University in 2012 after leading the library for three years in an interim capacity.  In his academic library career, Jeff has held positions in both public and technical services, including several years leading collection development at Arkansas State.  Jeff received his MSLS from Clarion University of Pennsylvania when online searching... Read More →
avatar for Linda Creibaum

Linda Creibaum

Acquisitions and Serials Librarian, Arkansas State University
Linda Creibaum is Acquisitions and Serials Librarian at Arkansas State University, where for the last 15 years she has been fascinated at the change in library resource formats and the nature of the “problems” she solves in her work day. Linda has worked in a variety of library positions, including Solo Librarian and Instructional Services Librarian.


Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

E-Resource Management
Libraries and librarians are being pressured to work smarter and more efficiently. How does one manage the library's resources when we are adding new faculty, new courses, increasing numbers of students, and we are told cut our materials budget?

Upgrade your experience by learning some approaches from your colleagues and sharing your experiences at this interactive session. We will focus on set up, access, technology, delivery, and organizational constraints.


Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

How to Use Altmetric Data for Impact Assessment: An Interactive Workshop
Registration Cost: $110

Institutions and researchers are facing increasing pressures from management, funders, and governmental reviews to demonstrate impact and engagement beyond academia. While demonstrating this impact continues to be challenging, the growth of online scholarly communication combined with advancing technologies offer us the ability to understand the reach and impact of research in ways that were never before possible.

In this hands-on workshop, we’ll explore how Altmetric tools can be used to analyse data such as mainstream media mentions, cites in policy documents, blogs, and social media in order to garner a much richer picture of the eventual outcomes and impact of research.  The session will be focused on the data, data sources, and strategies for investigating complex impact questions.

The session will cover the following topics and activities:


  • Explanation of Altmetric data, how it is collected and how it should & should not be interpreted

  • Activity to demonstrate the ways in which researchers, librarians, and research administrators can use the Altmetric application in their work activities.

  • Demonstration of how attendees can perform detailed and extensive analyses by making use of data exports or the Altmetric API.

  • Review different ways to integrate altmetrics into your institution’s existing platforms.


Note: Individuals will be asked to bring their own laptops and to set up a trial account of the Altmetric platform in advance.

 

Speakers
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Product Sales Manager, The Americas, Altmetric.com
Sara Rouhi has worked in scholarly publishing for seven years and manages sales and outreach in North America for Altmetric.com. She speaks and runs workshops on metrics in practice and the scholarly publishing process at library and scholarly publishing conferences worldwide. | | She is an active member of the Society of Scholarly Publishing's Education Committee and currently runs their Librarian Focus Group program. She was awarded... Read More →
avatar for Colleen Willis

Colleen Willis

Senior Librarian, Impact Services & Business Development, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Colleen Willis is a Senior Librarian, at the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. She is the project lead for the Library Impact Services, marketing and business development. She also teaches professional workshops for staff.


Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

Resources for Everyone: Challenges and Opportunities in Producing Learning Resources for Users of All Abilities
Registration Cost: $110

Licensing, marketing, access to digital scholarship, end users, innovation – these are terms which are inextricably linked to the world of the 21st century research libraries. Understanding diverse user experiences and developing new ideas and transparent approaches in serving these users brings new dimensions to the world of libraries. The following session is comprised of multiple speakers who are able to offer attendees a unique kaleidoscope glimpse into the diverse world of library users with print disabilities, incorporating technology demonstrations, a review of national and international legislative guidelines, and user input. This session will also offer the opportunity for the audience to raise valuable questions in a free-form forum style format, engaging with speakers and library patrons to tackle valuable topics of digital and print format accessibility and opportunities for libraries and publishers to grow in this area.

Lightning Talks (1hr)

  • 1 person on (US) accessibility/legal context (CSU)

  • 1 person (CAN) accessibility/legal context

  • 1 person on Marrakesh

  • 1 person research library context (US)

  • 1 person research library context (CAN)



Technology showcase + User Perspective (1hr)


  • Faculty and students talking about digital books

  • (presentation format + technology demo)


 

Moderators
Speakers
MC

Margaret Camp

Director of Disability Services, ADA Coordinator, Division of Student Affairs, University of South Carolina Upstate
CI

Charlotte Innerd

Head, Collection Development and Acquisitions, Wilfrid Laurier University Library
avatar for Binky Lush

Binky Lush

Manager, Discovery, Access and Web Services, Penn State University
Discovery, Access and Web Services at the Penn State University Libraries
KC

Kathryn Cornell Webster

Student, Wake Forest University


Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

Streaming Video in the Academy
Collection development and selection, technical services and workflows, pedagogy and assessment

As more and more academic libraries are offering streaming video for the development of online courses and use in course management systems, this pre-conference will provide an overview of the implementation, integration and use of streaming video in the academic library collection.  Key issues and best practices will be addressed. This pre-conference is intended for librarians who would like to learn more about setting up a streaming service, selection, technical services, workflows, and the use of streaming video.

 

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Barnett

Lindsay Barnett

Acquisitions and Electronic Resources Manager, College of Charleston
avatar for Howard Burton

Howard Burton

Host and CEO, Ideas Roadshow/Open Agenda Publishing
Howard Burton, the founding Executive Director of Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, has extensive experience in communicating sophisticated ideas to students and to the general public. He holds a PhD in theoretical physics and an MA in philosophy. | | Since Ideas Roadshow's first season in 2013, Howard has had in-depth conversations with about 75 of the most celebrated scientists, researchers, authors and... Read More →
avatar for Christine Fischer

Christine Fischer

Head of Acquisitions, University of North Carolina - Greensboro
Christine Fischer is the Head of Acquisitions at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she has worked since 2005. She has an interest in streaming film and in various acquisition models including demand driven acquisitions. She has held positions in academic and special libraries in both public and technical services.
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, College of the Arts, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers, faculty and students who are intriguing and dedicated to the disciplines they are engaged in. | | As a Charleston Conference Director I collaborate with other... Read More →


Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

Citation Analysis: How and Why
Registration Cost: $150

Analyzing citations from publications or coursework can help librarians measure how well they are meeting patrons’ needs, educate subject liaisons about the behaviors of their user groups, and reveal information needs that the library is not meeting. This hands-on workshop will combine technical instruction in using MS Access for data collection with a collaborative discussion of how citation data can meet participants’ goals. In addition to creating a blank Access database customized to their own goals, participants will review sample data from the presenter’s institution and discuss what it means for the library.

In the morning, we will create a collective list of possible goals, which will guide the design of the Access database. In the afternoon, we will do calculations using the presenter’s data. This step involves querying the database and exporting the results to Excel. We will also discuss possible interpretations of the findings. No experience with database design is needed, as the workshop leader will walk attendees through the steps of designing a relational database. Some knowledge of Excel is expected, though not necessarily experience with formulas. Handouts will be provided so participants can continue to build their citation databases after returning home.

NOTE: Participants will be required to bring their own laptops. 

Speakers
avatar for Karen Kohn

Karen Kohn

Collections Analysis Librarian, Temple University



Wednesday November 4, 2015 9:00am - 4:00pm
TBA

10:30am

Refreshment Break
Join us for a light refreshment break to celebrate the opening of the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Showcase and provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:30am

Charleston Vendor Showcase
Don't miss Charleston's only day of exhibitors. Browse the latest products and services, talk with reps, see demos, and snag cool freebies. We can't wait to see you there! Booths will be throughout the Mezzanine Level in the Carolina Ballroom, pre-function areas outside the ballroom, the Calhoun Room, the Pinckney Room, and on the second floor in the Gold Ballroom.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 10:30am - 6:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Now Playing-Demand Driven Video Streaming Across Libraries
Consortial and demand driven programs are becoming well established in academic libraries for many resources. However, as the use of streaming video snowballs in academia, could these two purchasing models be effectively extended to this medium?

In mid-2014, a pilot project spearheaded by the NY 3Rs Association and with participation from 8 New York State public and private academic libraries was launched to seek an answer this exact question. The colleges – all of varying sizes and profiles – collaborated to design and launch the first ever consortial demand driven pilot for streaming video in the world with Kanopy, a video streaming vendor with an unique Patron-Driven-Acquisition program for online video.

At the core of the pilot were a number of very important questions: (1) could we effectively coordinate collaborative decision-making with such a diverse profile of colleges involved?; (2) how could we best manage issues of fairness when dealing when such varying institutions and when size and budget may have no correlation to usage?; (3) how might the use of film across campuses differ from the use of ebooks and other resources in a group context; and (4) would the usage profile across the campus lead to better overall economics and outcomes than if each of had “gone solo”?

The project yielded many successes and challenges, fascinating cross-campus comparisons, and illuminating insights that will play a significant role in informing the structure and design of consortial programs into the future. Attendees will hear how statistics, teaching faculty input, and the profile and administrative structure of the participating libraries guided the design and decision-making under the program, as well as the key outcomes of the project.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Humphrey

Tom Humphrey

COO, Kanopy
avatar for Sheryl Knab

Sheryl Knab

Executive Director, Western New York Library Resources Council (WNYLRC)
Sheryl Knab is the Executive Director for the Western New York Library Resources Council (WNYLRC) one of 9 Reference and Resources Councils (NY3Rs) chartered in New York State under the New York State Library. WNYLRC is a multi-type consortium with 63 member public and school libraries and library systems, academic, hospital, museum, archival, and corporate libraries. Sheryl’s current focus is on collaborative library services both regionally... Read More →
avatar for Caryl Ward

Caryl Ward

Head of Acquisitions, Binghamton University Libraries
Caryl Ward is Head of Acquisitions at SUNY’s Binghamton University and subject librarian for Comparative Literature, Romance Languages, and Latin American and Caribbean Area Studies. She has 30 years of library experience in several areas, including serials and cataloging. Caryl’s current professional interests include streamlining e book purchasing, library public relations, and information literacy.


Wednesday November 4, 2015 11:35am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:00pm

Vendor Showcase Lunch
Lunch is provided for all preconference attendees and Conference registrants on the showcase floor. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the exhibits in the Francis Marion Hotel.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Deep Dive into KBART
Registration Cost: $110

Calling all content providers!  Do you want create KBART compliant metadata files, but don’t know where to begin?  Are you looking to upgrade your metadata from the KBART Phase I to the new KBART Phase II requirements? If you answered ‘yes’ to either of these questions, then this workshop is for you.

Join members of the KBART (Knowledge Bases and Related Tools) Standing Committee as they guide you through the ins and outs of the KBART Phase II Recommended Practice. Through classroom instruction and hands-on experience, the workshop will provide in-depth coverage of all KBART data elements, with special focus on many of the most frequently asked questions about the recommended practice. The session will also outline the steps in the KBART adoption process and highlight the benefits of endorsement. Participants will also gain insight into how the provision of standardized metadata can increase exposure of their electronic content, ensure smoother interoperability with knowledge base and link resolver vendors, and ultimately improve end user access. Don’t be afraid to take the plunge and see what KBART can do for you!

Target Audience: This workshop is targeted primarily at content providers and individuals responsible for supplying data to knowledgebases and link resolver vendors.  They are first step in the data supply chain; the KBART Recommended Practice is geared towards this group specifically.

Speakers
avatar for Marlene van Ballegooie

Marlene van Ballegooie

Metadata Librarian, University of Toronto
Marlene van Ballegooie is the Metadata Librarian at the University of Toronto Libraries. She received her MISt degree from the Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto. At the University of Toronto Libraries, Marlene is responsible for providing access to electronic resources, the maintenance of ILS metadata, and automated metadata generation. Her primary research interests include: e-data quality, electronic resource... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Johnson

Benjamin Johnson

Engagement Manager, Provider Relations, ProQuest
Ben Johnson is an Engagement Manager on ProQuest Content Operations' Provider Relations team. He is also the co-chair of the NISO KBART Standing Committee. Ben is responsible for outreach to providers on the benefits of working with ProQuest on the knowledgebase, Summon, Ulrichs and Bowker products. Previously Ben managed the team responsible for provider data for the PQ knowledgebase, and has worked with KB data with ProQuest since 2007.
avatar for Noah Levin

Noah Levin

Metadata Manager, Springer
Noah Levin works for Springer Nature managing their Link Resolver/Discovery data, MARC Records, ONIX Feeds and internal metadata workflows. Noah is also a member of the NISO KBART Standing Committee who last year released the KBART Phase II recommendations. Starting his career in the industry 19 years ago working in a bookstore, Noah has spent the last 15 years designing and creating metadata workflows for large Academic and Trade Publishers
SM

Sheri Meares

Sr. Director, Knowledge Base, EBSCO Information Services
GP

Gary Pollack

Gale, Cengage Learning
KW

Kristin Wilson

NC State University
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Manager, Discovery Service Relations, IEEE



Wednesday November 4, 2015 1:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA

1:00pm

Dismantling the Stumbling Blocks that Impede Researchers’ Access to E-Resources: An Ithaka S+R Workshop on Evidence-Based Decision-Making
Registration Cost: $250 (Discounted rate of $125 available for Ithaka S+R Survey Participants)

Academic and research libraries typically allocate the vast majority of their materials budgets to licensed e-resources. As usage has shifted toward these digital collections, researchers’ expectations for accessing them are being set not by improvements relative to the past but rather by reference to consumer internet services. Off-campus and mobile users face especially difficult challenges. Instead of the rich and seamless digital library for scholarship that they need, researchers today encounter archipelagos of content bridged by infrastructure that is insufficient and often outdated, as Roger Schonfeld argued in a recent Ithaka S+R issue brief.

In this workshop, Roger will help academic and research librarians consider steps they can take to improve access to licensed e-resources for their user communities.

Topics will include:


  • Using evidence to determine the extent of the problem among various user populations

  • Developing organizational structures and decision-making frameworks that recognize users’ changing workflows

  • Implementing acquisitions policies that foreground the importance of access

  • Providing infrastructure and systems that foreground the importance of access

  • How to balance collaborations and vendor contributions against the need to have a solution that works best for your institution


Participants will benefit from this workshop by improving their ability to identify and serve changing researcher expectations for access.

Prior to the event, we will ask all registrants to complete a worksheet enabling us to maximize the value of our time working together in person.

Speakers

Wednesday November 4, 2015 1:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA

1:00pm

Driving Your Data: Visualizing Your Usage Data to Show the Value of the Library
Registration Cost: $110

The first half of the preconference will feature a discussion of how to conduct a data audit to help librarians consider the variety of information they can collect—or already do—to comprehensively evaluate collections and services. Attendees will be encouraged to consider alternative data along with traditional vendor provided statistics, such as Google Analytics for website traffic, and/or circulation, instruction and other public services statistics. This will be followed by a discussion of how to identify campus priorities for assessment, with reflective activities to help align library goals to their institution’s mission and vision.

Following the break will be a demonstration and hands-on workshop featuring various visualization tools available to convert statistical data into visually compelling presentations.  All attendees who register in advance will be asked to bring a laptop, and will be learn to use a selection of visualization tools to create graphical representations of data, including freely available resources, commonly used productivity software (such as Excel), and specialized tools (such as Tableau). Attendees will be invited to bring samples of their own institutions’ data if they would like, but sample datasets of a variety of types of data will be provided as well.

NOTE: Participants will be required to bring their own laptops.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

Collection Development Librarian and Liaison Coordinator, Davidson College
avatar for Beth Martin

Beth Martin

Head of Assessment, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Elizabeth Siler

Elizabeth Siler

Collection Development Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Collection Development Librarian at UNC Charlotte. I am also Project Team member on the Mellon Funded Charlotte Initiative which focuses on the future of the Academic eBook Market. My presentations at Charleston this year, will focus mostly on usage statistics and how they can be used to help make collection decisions.


Wednesday November 4, 2015 1:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA

1:00pm

Negotiating with Vendors
Registration Cost: $110

The introduction of digital content created a new link in the information chain: the license. Almost every librarian responsible for arranging electronic access to information has had to review or negotiate not just prices but contractual terms, adding hours — sometimes frustrating hours at that — to the process of buying materials. But few have legal training, and most non-sales people haven’t spent a lot of time thinking about what underpins successful negotiations.

Negotiating with Vendors brings together librarians and vendors to help you prepare for these discussions. You’ll come away with a better understanding of what is involved in negotiating, why licenses matter, and how to use them to safeguard your rights and ensure that both party’s obligations are made clear. Some of the dizzying legalese will come into focus, and armed with fresh insights you’ll be able to approach license discussions with less anxiety and doubt.


Wednesday November 4, 2015 1:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

Refreshment Break
Join us for a light refreshment break during the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Showcase and provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:00pm

Doin' the Charleston Renaissance: Arts and Literature Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Broad Street Tours will be offering walking tours again this year.  Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides.  The daytime tours are two hours in length and cover about a mile distance.  

In the early 1900s, Charleston experienced a renaissance fueled by artists, writers, musicians, poets, and preservationists. Alice Ravenel Huger Smith, Elizabeth O’Neill Verner, and Alfred Hutty created lovely intimate scenes of the old city to sell to tourists. Charleston’s Poetry Society, one of the first of its kind, was formed in 1920. Dubose Heyward collaborated with George Gershwin to transform his novel Porgy into the opera “Porgy and Bess”. Jenkins Orphanage jazz bands played in the streets of Charleston, then New York and London. The arts brought much needed attention to the rather beleaguered city and lent support to the budding preservationist movement in Charleston. (2 hour tour)

For more information on all tours check out http://broadstreetbiz.com/walking-tours/charleston-conference-2015/.  Tours are $20.00 per person and payment may be made with cash or check at tour time.  Reservations are required as tour groups are limited to 20 people.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 3:00pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

General History Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Broad Street Tours will be offering walking tours again this year.  Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides.  The daytime tours are two hours in length and cover about a mile distance.  

This tour gives a general overview of Charleston’s history from the colonial era onward – through the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, to the city’s rediscovery and revitalization of the past 40 years. Participants will gain insight into Charleston’s early wealth and culture, viewing the city’s impressive public buildings and private mansions. Visitors will learn of architectural influences and other factors that resulted in modifications to original structures, with explanation of the single house, the double house and dependencies.

For more information on all tours check out http://broadstreetbiz.com/walking-tours/charleston-conference-2015/.  Tours are $20.00 per person and payment may be made with cash or check at tour time.  Reservations are required as tour groups are limited to 20 people.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 3:00pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

Charleston Culinary Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

NEW for 2015! Charleston Culinary Tour

Wednesday, November 4, 2015
3:00 - 5:30 PM
Cost: $60 per person
Limited to 28 people; first come, first served.

REGISTER NOW 


Exclusively for Charleston Conference attendees, this tour of Upper King Street restaurants showcases culinary innovators who exemplify cooking in the New South. The tour visits 3-4 different restaurants and combines elements of an historical tour with a culinary adventure. The food provided represents a broad range of samples of Lowcountry cuisine.

TOUR INCLUDES:

·         All food and non-alcoholic beverage tastings.

·         Enough food to make a meal for most.

PLEASE REMEMBER:

·         Refunds are only available if requested more than 24 hours in advance.

·         Tours are held rain or shine.

·         These are walking tours, and historic Charleston has a number of very uneven cobblestone streets and sidewalks. Please wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

Register now or through the link on the conference attendee registration form. Please contact Audrey Powers with questions: apowers@usf.edu.

 

Moderators
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, College of the Arts, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers, faculty and students who are intriguing and dedicated to the disciplines they are engaged in. | | As a Charleston Conference Director I collaborate with other... Read More →

Wednesday November 4, 2015 3:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

4:30pm

Vendor Showcase Reception
Visit the Showcase before it closes and enjoy wine, cheese, and fruit at the reception. The wine bar will be located inside the Carolina Ballroom and Gold Ballroom, but food will be scattered throughout the Showcase floor.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

5:00pm

Juried Product Development Forums
Advanced Registration Required: Invitations will be emailed to all librarian attendees. If you do not receive your invitation, please contact Caroline Goldsmith (caroline@charlestonlibraryconference.com).

The Forums are focus groups designed for publishers and vendors to gather market input from librarians on the development of a particular product or service, and for librarians to discuss market issues with publishers and vendors invited to participate in a forum.The Forum sessions for librarians are intended for library staff and will be closed to other publishers and vendors. Invitations will be sent to registered library workers by email, and there will be a staffed sign-up table at the Conference for attendees to register on-site. In addition, publishers & vendors may invite their customers to sign up for this event. Distributors, consultants or individuals from other companies will be admitted if the participating publisher or vendor has added their name to the list of attendees for their session.Publishers and vendors have a unique opportunity for feedback from librarians regarding the design, features, feasibility or pricing of a particular product or service that addresses internal debates and shortens the sales cycle.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 5:00pm - 6:15pm
TBA

6:00pm

Networking Happy Hour
Mix and mingle with other conference attendees over a beverage and a snack while visiting the Poster Sessions. Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available to purchase beverages.

6:00pm

Aligning Collections with Emerging Needs in Research Informatics
Some of the NCSU Libraries’ largest investments are in collections, digital library development, and technology-rich collaborative spaces. The goal of the NCSU Libraries Fellows Program initiative, "Aligning Collections with Emerging Needs in Research Informatics," is to ensure these areas leverage one another to the benefit of our users in support of emerging research informatics needs through licensing and acquisition of new data sources, as well as leveraging the capabilities of new high-tech library spaces. Over its two years, this initiative seeks to address and mainstream subject specialists’ and selectors’ consideration of high-tech research informatics needs of users.

This poster session will describe early accomplishments of the initiative, including content mining agreements, increased awareness of scholarly APIs, and an ontology to describe research informatics. The session will also cover ongoing work that includes an investigation of relevant collections, licensing terms, and the landscape of the current marketplace, an environmental scan of NCSU research and teaching contexts that would benefit from greater availability of content as data for computational purposes, “how to” documentation and training for more technologically sophisticated uses of existing resources, negotiations of select licenses to allow for more flexibility of content use, and revision of our website to promote the research informatics capacities of the Libraries’ collections to our users.

Speakers
avatar for Darby Orcutt

Darby Orcutt

Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
interdisciplinary research | TDM/ computational research - negotiations and agreements | library liaison roles | user-driven collections strategies
avatar for Heidi Tebbe

Heidi Tebbe

Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science, North Carolina State University Libraries
Heidi Tebbe is the Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science at North Carolina State University. She manages collections for subjects including engineering, computer science, physics, astronomy, and data science. Previously, she was an NCSU Libraries Fellow. Heidi earned an MA in Astronomy, an MS in Telecommunications with a focus on Immersive Mediated Environments, and an MLS with a Digital Libraries specialization... Read More →


6:00pm

Back to the Future: Re-Examining the Need for Shelf-Ready Processes in the E-Book Environment
Objective: Present the methodology, data, and findings of a study Texas Woman’s University Libraries conducted on its shelf-ready and in-house copy cataloging workflow.

Texas Woman’s University Libraries went shelf-ready with Baker and Taylor in 2013 in order to save staff time and money processing firm order print books. We assumed that routine copy cataloging took up a large portion of staff time and was not cost effective. By receiving the bulk of our firm order books “shelf-ready,” cataloging staff would be free to do other tasks and projects.

Questions were raised as we prepared to expand to another vendor: Is the quality of the cataloging and physical processing acceptable? How many and what sort of changes are staff needing to do with these books? How many days from order placement until the item is available? What is the true per book cost? Do we purchase enough print books that outsourcing still makes sense? What other efficiencies or technologies could we capitalize on? In light of these questions, we wanted to compare the two workflows - in-house copy cataloging and shelf-ready before making any additional outsourcing commitments. A two month study tracked all print books received from order to shelf; and a complete cost analysis of the entire acquisitions and cataloging processes was done.

Attendees will learn how one small library rec-examined what has become a common library practice in light of new technologies and reinstate a traditional workflow in order to move to the future.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Martin

Susan Martin

Head, Acquisitions Services, University of Chicago Library



6:00pm

DVD and Streaming Video: Choices for an Academic Library
In 2014 W. M. Randall Library subscribed to a package of streaming videos from Media Education Foundation. We already owned DVDs of 72% of titles in the package but their high circulation rates and faculty requests for streaming access warranted the cost of duplicating the content. One year later we assessed use of the titles in both the DVD and streaming collections. Our presentation will share our findings. The results may push us to change our collection development policy in terms of video format preference, duplication, and access vs. ownership. We will end the presentation with an open conversation with the audience about whether libraries have identified best practices for video selection that can be shared.

Speakers
JC

Jeanne Cross

Coordinator of Collection Development, University of North Carolina Wilmington


6:00pm

Expanding Limits with Get it Now
Objective: As collections evolve from models of access over ownership that incur significant subscription costs to the institution, the library investigated whether unmediated access to the Copyright Clearance Center's GetitNow service would be an alternative method of building our all-electronic collection by providing fast access to needed content that improves customer satisfaction and provides significant cost savings for the institution.

Methods: Library Administration initially picked 103 journals based on faculty recommendations, journal titles requested more than five times within the past two years via ILL, and unsubscribed titles listed as the top 20 subject specialty journals based on impact factors. The titles were added to Serials Solutions Link Resolver to facilitate direct access to content via Citation Matcher and/or PubMed LinkOut. Titles were continuously added from ILL requests exceeding the “rule of five.”

Results: During the first year, 183 requests from 114 unique requestors have been filled from 71 unique titles. 30 feedback surveys were returned documenting the ease and rapid delivery of needed content to support grant proposals, teaching, learning, and patient care.

Conclusions: Preliminary data support the use of GetitNow. Findings revealed the service is a cost-effective extension for burgeoning, all-electronic collections, and for connecting patrons to needed content easily and rapidly, and improving customer satisfaction. The service has also served to aid collection development decisions by documenting requests for content from unsubscribed journals based on actual use.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Gudenas

Jean Gudenas

Head of Collections Management, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Library
For the past five years, Jean Gudenas has been the Head of Collections Management for Loyola University Health Sciences Library in Maywood, Illinois. In that time, she has facilitated the transition of a largely print-based collection to a nearly all-electronic collection. Her current focus is determining what a collection is, specifically with the philosophy behind access versus ownership . She received her BA in Philosophy and English from... Read More →


6:00pm

From the Ground Up: Notes from a First Attempt at New Collection Building
In 2011, California Baptist University launched a new five-year Master of Architecture (M.Arch) program and the library was tasked with building a 5,000 volume collection to meet National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) criteria within five years. Starting with 1,000 books and $11,000, this is the story of our progress so far: how we got here, what we’ve learned, and our plans for the future.

My objective is to share my first-time experiences building a print and electronic subject collection from very little with a small budget and a deadline, and to discuss the various selection tools and resources I’ve found useful during this process. The audience will be able to ask questions and share their experiences and advice for building new collections, and can expect to learn what building a new subject collection has been like for our library (including budget and holdings/acquisitions statistics) and the various tools and resources that have helped with selection.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Flater

Elizabeth Flater

Collection Development Librarian, California Baptist University



6:00pm

Not So Strange Bedfellows: Information Standards For Librarians AND Publishers
As our collections become increasingly electronic, standards play an increasingly important role not only in the work of librarians but also in that of publishers. This session will describe standards and recommended practices that are designed to support the publishing, identification, and retrieval of electronic materials, including KBART (Knowledge Bases and Related Tools), the DOI (Digital Object Identifiers), and EPUB (not an acronym...). What are they, what do they do, how do they relate to the work of a broad spectrum of attendees, and particularly why we should care. The presenters are co-chairs of the NISO (National Information Standards Organization) Content and Collection Management Topic Committee.
The objectives of the session are to demystify the alphabet soup of standards and to highlight practices that will help us to better serve our users. The audience will be encouraged to ask questions and to discuss. Attendees can expect to learn about a focused, relevant set of standards and best practices and how they directly affect the attendees and their work.

Speakers
avatar for Martha  Heyman

Martha Heyman

Executive Director, Metadata Standards and Services, Gale/Cengage Learning
Marti Heyman (MLIS, MBA) is a seasoned professional with over 28 years of experience applying information science principles to diverse business challenges in a variety of industry settings, including manufacturing (DuPont), professional services (Deloitte), enterprise software (Oracle) and publishing (Dow Jones; Gale/Cengage Learning). She has been involved in the design and use of controlled vocabularies in support of knowledge discovery... Read More →
avatar for Betty Landesman

Betty Landesman

Betty Landesman has held positions in technical services and electronic resources management in a variety of academic and special libraries, and is co-chair of the NISO Content and Collection Management Topic Committee with Marti Heyman. She is a long-time Charleston, NASIG, and ER&L attendee and presenter on the topic of standards.



6:00pm

Planting Scholarly Communication Seeds: Getting Graduate Students Involved in the Cycle
This presentation will be focused on library sessions conducted for a graduate level education course at a large research institution. The sessions which were taught once a year in the spring semester and discussed all things scholarly communication: the open access movement, altmetrics, journal impact factor, and organizational/departmental culture, to name a few. Questions addressed include what do graduate students need to know to participate in this conversation now as they work on their dissertations and in their future as faculty members? Most graduate students are focused on the research and methodology portions of their dissertations, but what if we could shift their perspective to think more about publishing in the digital age? What will they do with their dissertations? What will it look like? How about future publications? The library sessions taught were so successful that a full fledged for-credit course was created in the College of Education for all interested graduate students. Attendees will learn how to approach graduate students with this topic, how to get involved in courses to begin with, and how it can look at your institution. Discussion can be focused around what others have done already or how it can be scaled to any kind of institution. If we want to change the landscape of scholarly communication on college campuses, why not start with graduate students before they become faculty?

Speakers
JM

Jill Morningstar

Education, Psychology, and Children's Literature Librarian, Michigan State University Libraries


6:00pm

Stop, Collaborate and Listen: How the Librarian-Publisher Relationship Can Facilitate the Development of Information Literacy Curriculum
The last decade has seen immense growth in information sources and information output, which in turn has changed the way students and researchers find and use information. Following this, we’ve also seen a shift from the traditional “librarian as expert” role to the “librarian as teacher” role, where the imparting of information literacy skills and their embedding into the curriculum is recognized as a primary responsibility of today’s academic librarian.

This session will explore how librarians are becoming more involved with information literacy curriculum and how publishers can assist them, particularly regarding access to information and the scholarly publishing process.

Rebecca Donlan, Assistant Director for Collection Management at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU), will provide an overview of FGCU Scholars: Think-Write-Discover, the university’s new five-year Quality Enhancement Plan for reaffirmation, with information literacy and undergraduate research as a primary objective.

Stacy Sieck, Library Communications Manager at Taylor & Francis, will discuss their existing portfolio of resources aimed at educating students and researchers on issues like how to get published, tips for writing research papers, and more. Stacy will also draw on two Taylor & Francis white papers on facilitating access to information and peer review.

Finally, Becky and Stacy will discuss the information literacy project they’re collaborating on, which focuses on creating a series of webinars and other tools to educate FGCU students and staff on navigating the scholarly publishing process.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Donlan

Rebecca Donlan

Assistant Director for Collection Management, Florida Gulf Coast University
Rebecca Donlan is Assistant Director for Collection Management at Florida Gulf Coast University, where she has worked since May 2000.  A graduate of the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science, she has worked in public and academic libraries since 1990, serving in reference, cataloging, serials, and children’s departments.  Currently she is Editor-in-Chief of Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services... Read More →


6:00pm

Take the NASIG Core Competencies Out for a Joy Ride
This presentation will examine the literature discussing the NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians (ERLs) and how these competencies are changing the way in which ERLs perform their duties. The presenter will report the results of a pilot project using the NASIG Core Competencies to create professional development activities.

Attendees will be engaged in discussion with the presenter and participate in various polls throughout the session. All participants will gain a better understanding of the NASIG Core Competencies and how they can be used to enhance the skills of library staff and provide better service to library users.

Speakers
SB

Stacy Baggett

Electronic Resources Librarian, Shenandoah University
Stacy Baggett, Electronic Resources Librarian at Shenandoah University in Winchester, VA, manages all aspects of the e-resources life cycle. Her previous experience includes cataloging, strategic planning, and workflow analysis. Stacy holds an M.L.S from North Carolina Central University and an M.B.A and B.S. in Business Administration from East Carolina University.


6:00pm

The Library is our Lab: A Survey of E-Book Use in the Humanities and Implications for Current Collections Development Practice
Humanities researchers consider the library to be their laboratory, and its print collections their essential research equipment. In spite of anecdotal evidence that both students and faculty in the Humanities prefer print materials over e-books, academic libraries are allocating a steadily increasing proportion of their acquisitions budgets toward the purchase of e-books across all disciplines. Likewise, austerity measures have discouraged the practice of ‘duplicate titles’ in library collections.
At Western University in London, Ontario, Peggy Ellis and Fran Gray surveyed Arts & Humanities faculty members and graduate students to gain a better understanding of their attitudes toward e-books. Based on our findings, we are able to identify implications for collections development practice for librarians supporting research and teaching in the Arts and Humanities.

Speakers
PE

Peggy Ellis

Research and Instruction Librarian, University of Western Ontario
Peggy Ellis is an Associate Librarian at The D.B. Weldon Library at Western University. As subject librarian for Modern Languages & Literatures, French, Linguistics and Theory and Criticism, she has taught information literacy and fluency in the Humanities. Her current research interests include book format preferences for Humanities scholars.
FG

Fran Gray

Research and Instruction Librarian, University of Western Ontario


6:00pm

Weeding Politics-Related Book Collections in Academic Libraries
Many libraries face challenges in accommodating their print collections, whether these challenges are the result of the size and predicted growth of the collection itself or from pressures to use library space for new services. Very little research has been done on how librarians approach weeding within a particular academic subject area, such as political science, and how they apply general weeding plans and criteria to a specific subject. Our presentation reviews findings from a 2015 survey that examines the weeding practices and opinions of academic librarians with responsibility for managing book collections in political science and related disciplines such as international studies, public policy, public administration, and legal studies. Survey topics included motivations for and obstacles to weeding, deselection criteria, and the role of faculty from affected disciplines. Responses to the survey allow us to identify trends in weeding practices, compare perceptions among librarians at different types of institutions, and suggest best practices for political science collection development.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Ackerman

Erin Ackerman

Social Sciences Librarian, The College of New Jersey
avatar for Lisa DeLuca

Lisa DeLuca

Social Sciences Librarian, Seton Hall University


6:00pm

​Excel Tips​ to Make Your Life Easier
This session is for novice and frequent Excel users who may have never taken the time to investigate shortcuts intended to make using Excel more productive. This presentation will demonstrate tips on efficient navigation, formatting, ease in viewing, printing and give other helpful hints. For instance, how do you keep your headers from scrolling off the screen, remove all of the blank cells in your ISBN list or print your column headers on each page? Attendees will also be encouraged to share their helpful hints and hopefully learn a couple of gems that will make Excel more fun.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Winecoff

Michael Winecoff

Associate Dean for Collection Services, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Associate Dean for Collection Services and oversee Collections and Acquisitions. Before taking this position I gained valuable paraprofessional experience as a copy cataloger, catalog maintenance coordinator and supervisor of the Accounts Payable and Receiving section of Acquisitions and Assistant University Librarian for Library Systems.



7:00pm

Ghostly Stroll Walking Tour
Limited Capacity filling up

Broad Street Tours will be offering walking tours again this year.  Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides.  

Charleston is believed to be a most haunted place. The city has experienced numerous natural and manmade disasters in its long history; stories and legends of great fear, suffering, and death abound. The historic district with hundreds of old buildings provides familiar settings for spirits to revisit and haunt. Charleston, called the “Holy City”, is known for its beautiful historic churches – whose graveyards hold many secrets and horrors. Beguiling tales will take you back to a time when life was tenuous, survival uncertain. Come hear legends from the past and take in the beautiful ambiance of Charleston at night. (1 1/2 hour tour)

For more information on all tours check out http://broadstreetbiz.com/walking-tours/charleston-conference-2015/.  Tours are $20.00 per person and payment may be made with cash or check at tour time.  Reservations are required as tour groups are limited to 20 people.

Wednesday November 4, 2015 7:00pm - 8:30pm
TBA
 
Thursday, November 5
 

6:30am

"Move a Little, Drink a Latte" 5K or 1 Mile Fun Run
Brought to you by BiblioBoard and HEART

Join your fellow intrepid conference-goers for an early morning jaunt around some familiar Charleston haunts— 5k or 1 mile, run or walk, go the whole distance or just meet for an early coffee — it’s just a loosely organized* chance to get a little fresh air and fresh coffee to complement the conference’s fresh content. 

1K and 5K Maps (PDF Download) 


Thursday November 5, 2015 6:30am - 7:30am
Marion Square Park 329 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

8:30am

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Speakers
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston


8:35am

Courtney Young, Head Librarian and Professor of Women's Studies, Pennsylvania State University, 2014-2015 American Library Association (ALA) President
Speakers
avatar for Courtney Young

Courtney Young

Head Librarian and Professor of Women's Studies, Pennsylvania State University
Courtney L. Young, the 2014-2015 American Library Association (ALA) President, is currently Head Librarian and Professor of Women's Studies at Penn State Greater Allegheny.  In 2011, Courtney was named a Library Journal "Mover& Shaker", recognized as a Change Agent for her ability to successfully make connections among a diversity of duties in her library, on campus, and in the profession. She received her M.S. in Library Science from... Read More →


9:15am

Star Wars in the Library: Part I (The Revenge of the Jedi) and Part II (The Force Awakens)
Twenty years ago, Jim O’Donnell said that the right model for the next generation of librarianship would be somewhere between James Fenimore Cooper’s Pathfinder and George Lucas’s JediKnight.  Now he has become a next generation librarian himself as director of libraries at Arizona State.  In this talk he will describe what he has found on the new job and outline some provocative strategic directions he proposes for all of us.


10:00am

Presentation of Vickie Speck Leadership Award
Speakers
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston


10:10am

10:30am

Industry Consolidation: 2 Real, Big Examples
During 2015 the library industry has seen continuing consolidation of its suppliers. This panel will include representatives from Ebsco and ProQuest to describe and discuss their recent acquisitions of YBP and Coutts respectively.
In both cases, the acquiring organization is not a print book supplier. What caused these companies to make these acquisitions? What is their vision for serving their customers? What benefits should libraries expect from these acquisitions? And how is it going?
The panel will also include 2 librarian representatives who are customers of Coutts and YBP. How do they see this consolidation? What benefits would they hope to achieve as a result? How is going from the customer’s point of view?
The Charleston Conference has its roots in the relationship between suppliers and the acquisition process by libraries. This panel addresses what appears to be a new phase of consolidation in that process.

Speakers
avatar for Tommy Doyle

Tommy Doyle

Senior Vice President and General Manager of RELX’s Science & Technology Research Reference Business, Elsevier
Tommy Doyle is the Senior Vice President and General Manager of RELX’s Science & Technology Research Reference Business (formerly known as the Science & Technology Books Group). He is responsible for delivering overall performance and ensures the business is positioned for future growth. Tommy leverages big data signals from across Elsevier’s unique platforms and services to drive organic and inorganic investments for their... Read More →


10:30am

The Secret Life of Articles: From Download Metrics to Downstream Impact
Traditional citation and download metrics have long been the standard by which we measure the use and value of scholarly articles. However, these methods neglect the usage and real-world impact of newer technologies to access, store and share downloaded scholarly articles. This session’s speakers will share the results of interviews, focus groups, and an international survey with more than 1000 scholars to investigate the ways in which they now access, store, share and use downloaded scholarly articles. By identifying and measuring what traditional metrics fail to examine, the Beyond Downloads project attempts to capture a more complete picture of the use and value of scholarly articles, which is critical for librarians, publishers and vendors to understand in developing scholarly tools and services. Complete usage can no longer be measured by traditional means alone. The speakers will discuss the findings of their research and the implications for metrics that take into account scholars’ changing access, reading and sharing behaviors.

Speakers
PS

Peter Shepherd

Director, Project COUNTER
avatar for Carol Tenopir

Carol Tenopir

Chancellor’s Professor, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
A frequent speaker at professional conferences and prolific author, Carol Tenopir is a Chancellor's Professor and Director of the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee. She is on the Board of Directors for project COUNTER and the Principal Investigator for research projects that investigate measuring the value and outcomes from scholarly reading and data management.


10:30am

Think like a Start-Up (or an Upstart!)
This session explores start-up mentalities with three candid perspectives from actual start-ups embedded within the library and publishing community. Moderated by Ann Okerson, panelists Peter Brantley (Hypothes.is, NYPL, UC Davis), Franny Lee (newly ProQuest SIPX), and Mitchell Davis (BiblioLabs) will discuss topics such as where they get ideas from, how they think about problem-solving and risk, their approaches on sharing and collaboration, and the effect of speed and nimbleness. They will share experiences about successes, but also about failures and the benefits of taking full advantage of every learning experience. The objective is to highlight and hopefully help attendees identify for themselves opportunities to bring entrepreneurial energy into everyday thinking and actions for libraries.

Moderators
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Peter Brantley

Peter Brantley

Director, Online Strategy, UC Davis Library
Peter Brantley (@naypinya) is the Director of Online Strategy for the University of California Davis Library. Previously, I was the Director of Digital Development at New York Public Library, and before that, the Director of Scholarly Communication at the open source not-for-profit, Hypothes.is. I have worked at the Internet Archive on policy issues and open standards, and managed technology groups at a variety of academic research libraries. For... Read More →
avatar for Mitchell Davis

Mitchell Davis

CFO, Bibliolabs
Mitchell Davis is a publishing and media entrepreneur. He was the founder in 2000 of BookSurge the world’s first integrated global print-on-demand and publishing services company (sold to Amazon.com in 2005 and re-branded as CreateSpace).   Since 2008 he has been founder & chief business officer of BiblioLabs -- the creators of BiblioBoard. | BiblioBoard is an award-winning App and web content delivery... Read More →
avatar for franny lee

franny lee

GM and VP SIPX (Co-Founder), SIPX (ProQuest, Ex Libris)
Franny Lee is GM and VP ProQuest SIPX and leads the team.  Franny is dedicated to harnessing technology to make content, copyright and education more accessible and affordable. She is a frequent speaker and writer on the emerging issues at the intersection of campus needs, libraries, online education, digital content and high technology, and serves on the Management Board of MIT Press.  Originally a composer and jazz musician, Franny... Read More →


11:35am

Bringing Some Cents to Collection Development in a Consortial Environment

Academic libraries have traditionally purchased books to support current and future curricular and research needs at their individual institutions. At the same time academic libraries have been challenged in times of static or declining budgets to balance patron demand for access to content against the security of owning collections uniquely tailored to the communities they serve. The costs associated with ownership of many of the same e-book titles combined with the duplication of effort by members of the PALCI consortium led to the development of a shared demand driven acquisition (DDA) model based on patron selection at the point of use. The PALCI DDA program was initially piloted in 2014 with EBSCO, ebrary and YBP, continued in 2014-15 and extended in early 2015 with a JSTOR pilot. The purpose of each pilot was to determine the value of a cooperative DDA model that could eventually replace the need for individual PALCI libraries to manage their own DDA projects, establish cost models that might be equal or lower than traditional ILL, and potentially lower overall costs of acquiring e-book content for member libraries. 

This session will review the value of the PALCI DDA model to participating member libraries; marketing strategies used to gain buy-in from member libraries; the different publisher and aggregator DDA models; the different cost contribution models used to address differences in size of libraries across PALCI and the future of PALCI DDA. The program will be of interest to libraries that are considering or have already implemented DDA, as well as publishers, eBook aggregators, and information vendors. The PALCI consortium includes 69 academic and other research libraries in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, West Virginia and New York that support teaching and research interests at institutions that range from small colleges to large research universities.

 


Speakers
avatar for Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Information Systems Librarian and Associate Professor,, Millersville University
avatar for Jeremy Garskof

Jeremy Garskof

Acquisitions Librarian, Gettysburg College
avatar for Chris Martire

Chris Martire

Special Projects Consultant, PALCI
Chris currently serves as Special Projects Consultant for PALCI, a consortium of 68 academic and other research libraries in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, West Virginia and New York. In her previous role as PALCI’s Senior Program Officer, Chris led cooperative print and digital collection management initiatives, including DDA eBook, eResource, and Distributed Print programs. Prior to joining PALCI, Chris worked as Director, Member Services for... Read More →



11:35am

Elements of the Successful IR
It’s recently come to our attention that libraries are struggling with promotion and development of their Institutional Repositories (IRs). More and more colleagues have been contacting us about how we have created and sustained an effective IR program. The SFA Center for Digital Scholarship, only 13 months old, has developed an IR with diverse content incorporating traditional and non-traditional resources combined with multi-media and 3D objects. Achieving this diversity came about through extensive promotion and faculty interaction. This program advancement included customized services, forums, and constant presentation at all levels of the university community. These IR activities have included a focus on student digital humanities classes and projects, as well as faculty eResearch collaborations. The wide variety of content includes open access journals, electronic books, events and conferences, research projects, and art galleries. The entire campus is involved in the IR and attuned to the latest projects. The speakers will describe their strategies for launching the new IR and share the components for ongoing efforts with an IR that is a popular and integral element of university scholarship.

Speakers
avatar for Corrie Marsh

Corrie Marsh

Scholarly Communications & Collections, Old Dominion University Libraries
Corrie Marsh is the Scholarly Communications & Collections at Old Dominion University Libraries. She earned her B.S. at the University of North Texas and her M.S.L.I.S. at Louisiana State University, where she also worked in serials and collection development. Corrie worked in Acquisitions and Collection Management at Old Dominion University, Georgetown Law Center, Brown University, and George Washington University. Her experience in... Read More →
DW

Dillon Wackerman

Digital Repository Librarian, Southern Methodist University


11:35am

Faculty and Student Engagement with Streaming Video
In the past 2 years, there has been an explosion of video in higher education, from the use of video in flipped classrooms and MOOC's, in distance education, hybrid classrooms, and even in individual study. This presentation pulls together industry and institution-level studies, as well as international surveys, in-depth focus groups, interviews and institutional case studies with students, academics and librarians. We will discuss the findings on student and faculty engagement with video, present and future, and what it means for libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications, UNC Greensboro
ME

Mike Eyler

Account Executive, Swank
avatar for Elisabeth Leonard

Elisabeth Leonard

Senior Field Editor, SAGE Publications


11:35am

From Usability Studies to User Experience: Designing Library Services
User Experience (UX) is high on libraries' agendas today as they strive to make collections discoverable, optimize resource usage, and support users in achieving their academic goals. Intuitive, user friendly discovery services are key to making this happen and therefore, many libraries are performing usability or user studies for their systems and services. This session will provide useful insights into the process for completing such studies, ways to put the results into practice, and user interface and user services design in general.

The session will reflect different viewpoints and discuss the stages of designing a new User Interface. It will showcase expertise in UX in general and focus on real examples from the usability tests and discovery tool implementations of The University of Kansas (KU) and Tulane University and the new User Interface design of Primo (Ex Libris).

The University of Kansas will present the process they underwent in order to engage their library staff with their discovery tool – including a survey with KU librarians comparing Primo to Google Scholar and their favorite databases , the implementation of the suggested improvements to the discovery tool, and a second survey to test the success of their changes.

Tulane University will present the redesign of their Primo User interface, including usability tests, identification of improvement areas, implementation of changes and follow up usage analysis to understand the effect of the changes.

Ex Libris will present the main principles for the new Primo user interface , and discuss benefits of state-of-the-art technologies, such as Angular, when considering re-design and customization of websites and discovery services.

Audience members will be asked to share their experiences and priorities with user services and user interface design.

Speakers
MB

Miri Botzer

Product Manager, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
avatar for Lea Currie

Lea Currie

Head of Content Development, University of Kansas Libraries
Lea Currie has been the head of Content Development at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008 and employed with the Libraries in other positions since 1999. Lea’s principal role in her current position is to manage the collection development budget, review and analyze collections, and coordinate collection development projects.


Thursday November 5, 2015 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Gathering the Needles: Evaluating the Impact of Gold Open Access content within Traditional Subscription Journals
Investigating the use of gold open access content within subscription content has been a near impossible task until the adoption of the COUNTER 4 statistics in 2014. By reviewing the COUNTER JR1 GOA 2014 reports, two librarians evaluate the gold open access usage at their respective institutions from the following publishers: Elsevier, NPG, OUP, Sage, Springer, Taylor and Francis, and Wiley. This initial investigation will be a benchmark for future studies to see if there is any impact on subscribed content or if usage is limited to non-subscribed content from these providers. Attendees will become familiar with the JR1 GOA reports from COUNTER as well be introduced to new evaluative techniques for hybrid open access content.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University



11:35am

Going Local: Creating Unique & Special Collections in an Academic Library
Over the past two years, the University of British Columbia – Okanagan Campus Library has undertaken a review to update their special collections and focus on the local geographical areas and targeted populations. From this, a localized, accessible, and unique collection has emerged that can better serve the students and faculty on campus, as well as community user groups in the area. This project helped to grow the community engagement focused strategic direction of the university and increase the visibility of the library in the surrounding community through building new relationships.
This session will focus on examining the roles libraries can play in developing targeted and focused special collections, drawing from recent experience in reimagining and expanding an existing special collection within a newer academic campus library. It is hoped that this session can spark active audience discussion around the impact special collections can have on the strategic goals of a library or university/college and on the roles and responsibilities academic libraries have in preserving local history.

Speakers
avatar for Arielle Lomness

Arielle Lomness

Collections Librarian, University of British Columbia - Okanagan
Arielle is currently responsible for coordinating the UBC Library's Okanagan campus collections activities, including acquisitions, renewals, and cancellations. Along with the Library's Vancouver campus, she has been participating in leading e-book evidence-based and package acquisitions programs. Additional responsibilities include overseeing book and other material donations to the Library. | | Arielle’s research interests include... Read More →



11:35am

Is Inventory Management Worth It? Two Case Studies
Why do an inventory of a library collection? The reasons range from auditing and insurance purposes to having confidence in the records for decision making purposes.  However, the process can be labor intensive and is not without it’s downsides.  There is also some debate about the frequency with which inventory activities need to happen.   In this session, we will examine some of the reasons behind the conduct of inventories in libraries, discuss the pros and cons of doing so, and share the results of two studies.  The first study is a survey conducted at the University of the West Indies Library System.  The UWI is made up of 4 campuses (3 physical campuses based in Barbados, Jamaica and Trinidad and the Open Campus which is online).   Management Audit teams have stressed the need for physical inventories to be done annually to ensure that there is accountability and that book values for insurance purposes are properly matched.  However, the literature has shown that there is a different thinking in some libraries and the survey results will present varying views as well.  The second study is the presentation of an inventory currently in progress at Indiana University.  IU is conducting an inventory of its main library, a collection of over three million volumes, for the first time in a very long time (perhaps ever).  The process and preliminary data will be shared with participants to determine whether an inventory is the right solution at their institution.   

Speakers
JB

Junior Browne

Officer in Charge, University of the West Indies
Junior Browne is currently the Officer-in-Charge, Faculty of Law Library, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados. He has served as Acquisitions Librarian and Public Services Librarian and has done a short stint as Head of Cataloguing. His interests are wide and diversed! He holds a BSc Economics and Management, LLB and MA Library and Information Science.
avatar for Sherri Michaels

Sherri Michaels

Head of Collection Management, Indiana University Libraries
Sherri Michaels is currently the Head of Collection Management at Indiana University. She also serves as the collection manager and liaison for the Psychological and Brain Sciences Department. Sherri received her Master’s degree in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. When not at work, Sherri imposes her compulsive organizational behavior on her husband, daughters, cat, house, and Girl Scout troop.



11:35am

Longitudinal Journal Usage Analysis and the Development of Institutional Specific Core Journals

With flat and declining budgets and the continuous annual inflation, many libraries face an unsustainable collection environment.  Some libraries may need to return to title by title selection which protects disciplinary core journals. Difficulties arise in identifying core journals by discipline as traditionally defined in collection management and assessment as scholarship continues to broaden and diversify. As a result, MTSU librarians have been using a combination of serials usage data and assigned subjects to isolate core journals specific to our academic programs. We have created datasets that include 2012 thru 2014 data as well as Jan – June 2015 usage (annualize) to identify patterns in journal use for our campus.  The result of analysis of this dataset is that we can identify the top used journals per subject over time. The practical implications for collection assessment include creating lists of highly used journals per subject and journals with the lowest use (ranked by subject).

These analyses have already proven useful in identifying areas of high usage in interdisciplinary journals as well as unexpected areas of scholarship (i.e. Medical journals when we do not have a medical school).  We have also used these analyses in accreditation reviews for academic programs and they have led to productive discussions with outside reviewers.


Speakers
avatar for Larry Hansard

Larry Hansard

Assistant Professor, James E. Walker Library, Middle Tennessee State University
avatar for Rachel Kirk

Rachel Kirk

Professor, Assessment Librarian, Middle Tennessee State University



11:35am

Mind the Gap: Find and Fix the Mismatches Between Faculty and Academic Librarians
Meredith Schwartz, Executive Editor of Library Journal, and Jennifer Albers-Smith, Marketing Director, Academic and Special Libraries of Gale Cengage Learning, will co-present key findings from their recent joint study, Bridging the Librarian-Faculty Gap in the Academic Library. Schwartz and Albers-Smith will convene a panel that includes an academic librarian who works on innovative faculty support projects—Will Cross, Director, Copyright and Digital Scholarship of the North Carolina State University Libraries - and a faculty member TBD. Together they will discuss ways to act on the survey’s takeaways and improve connection, communication, and collaboration between faculty and librarians.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Meredith Schwartz

Meredith Schwartz

Executive Editor, Library Journal
Meredith Schwartz is Executive Editor for Library Journal, and author of the article "Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries."


11:35am

Overcoming the Challenges to Seamless Access to Licensed Content
In a world where there is an increasing expectation that "one click will get you there", this session examines just how difficult it can often be for a researcher to access journal content to which their own institution has a current institutional license, because of inefficiencies in the infrastructure provided by publishers, libraries, aggregators, platform providers, alerting services, discovery services, link resolvers, proxy servers, and authentication systems. These challenges affect users across all types of institutions, and they are growing in importance as online and distance education advances and usage of mobile devices explodes in the shift towards a post-PC environment.

In developing countries these challenges are often exacerbated by additional factors like low bandwidth, but public-private initiative Research4Life has developed a technical solution to at least one of the other challenges. Details of this will be shared along with the implementation hurdles encountered along the way, what Research4Life aims to do to improve its user experience further, and the challenges faced in taking its plans forward.

As library-intermediary-publisher partnerships work to address these issues for more advanced environments, there are opportunities to learn from the needs and plans of developing world initiatives as well.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Gedye

Richard Gedye

Director of Outreach Programmes, STM
RICHARD GEDYE has worked in academic journals publishing since 1986, firstly at Macmillan. In 1991 he joined Oxford University Press where he held a number of positions, including director of sales, marketing, and research. In 2002 he helped found COUNTER, an international organization which has established a code of practice for vendor-based online usage statistics, and which he chaired for eight years. Since January 2011, Richard has been... Read More →


11:35am

Shotgun Session
1. Planning Grants: The CliffsNotes Version
Katy Ginanni, Peter Johnson

Library planning grants typically provide funding to engage the services of third-party consultants for a wide range of planning activities. A planning grant is a powerful tool that may be used to assess the need for new services, identify ways to improve existing services, plan library spaces, develop technology plans, or conduct planning to support a larger grant. Perhaps the most valuable outcome of a planning grant is the objective feedback provided by expert consultants; this feedback can be used to justify budget requests for new resources or initiatives to serve library patrons. The presenters will share their experience in developing a proposal for a Library Services Technology Act (LSTA) Planning Grant and the process of administrating grant activities. 

2. Summon, Google Scholar, and the Journey of Discovery : Where do we go from here?
Tracy Gilmore, Cynthia Schwartz

As part of a four year assessment study of the Summon Discovery Service, librarians at Virginia Tech used  a mixed methods approach to gain insight on Summon usage among students and faculty. Our findings show that Virginia Tech students are using Google and Google Scholar in tandem with Summon to discover library content. The reasons are as interesting as they are varied. We will examine what participants shared with us about their use of multiple platforms in lieu of Summon.

The study employed 3 online surveys, 10 focus group sessions, and 8 interviews conducted in 2012 through the spring semester of 2015.  We’ll talk specifically about the methodologies used and our current findings; the recommendations made from our findings; and the changes that were implemented as a result of the study. We will also discuss our rationale, marketing, and promotion of the overall study.

3.Ethnographic Research in Academia: More than just shadowing customers 
Margot Lyon, Maria Stanton, Kate Lawrence

The details of ethnographic user research sound complicated, don’t they? Distilling findings, synthesizing results, modeling after the Six Sigma method – it can sound overwhelming.  But in this session, Kate Lawrence of EBSCO Information Services and Margot Lyon and Maria Stanton of ATLA will break down this research method into digestible bits.
Come hear about the innovative ways their organizations have been observing and understanding the workflow, motivations, and goals of users of diverse library database products.  We will provide an overview of why ethnography differs from other methods and present key findings from various ethnography studies of college students, graduate students and faculty. Panelists will discuss the foundations of ethnography, and provide an overview that empowers attendees to return to their institutions with the skills to conduct a basic ethnographic study. This session will also provide resources and tips on how to get started with ethnographic research in your own environments. 

4. Leveraging Usage Data & User-Driven Development to Extend the Use of Collections 
Kristen Garlock

This session will present a case study that employed usage data analysis and a low-cost rapid development model to build an experimental tool for educators. The rapid development model used for these projects is reproducible and effective, and could be applied to many library-driven efforts. 

In 2014, the JSTOR Labs team used an algorithm to identify more than 9,000 articles on JSTOR that exhibited patterns of use consistent with being used in the classroom or assigned as coursework. Using a rapid development approach called “flash builds,” the team validated and built a prototype browser for this dataset with the direct involvement of teachers at the secondary and introductory college levels. This dataset is now available as "Classroom Readings," a free and open experimental resource. Classroom Readings (http://labs.jstor.org/readings) is designed for educators at the secondary school and college introductory levels and aims to help them quickly and efficiently find articles on JSTOR that are good candidates for teaching. 

While the direct application of Classroom Readings is specific to JSTOR, we believe that libraries have the assets to be similarly successful with this approach. We’ll share our lessons learned and processes that have now been used to create several more added-value tools.
 

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Garlock

Kristen Garlock

Associate Director, Education & Outreach, ITHAKA
Kristen Garlock is the Associate Director of Education and Outreach for JSTOR, responsible for education, training, and social media engagement. She has an MILS (1994) from the University of Michigan, and has worked at JSTOR since 1995.
avatar for Tracy Gilmore

Tracy Gilmore

Collections Assessment Librarian, Virginia Tech
Tracy Gilmore is the Collections Assessment Librarian at Virginia Tech University Libraries. She coordinates assessment activities and strategies for developing the library’s digital collections. Her current research interests include discovery service usability, usage, and access.
avatar for Katy Ginanni

Katy Ginanni

Acquisitions Librarian, Western Carolina University
Katy Ginanni's jobs in life have included swimming instructor and lifeguard; artist's model; serials acquisitions and electronic resources for several academic libraries; account services, training, and sales manager for a subscription agent; Peace Corps Volunteer; bartender; and, most recently, collection development. She holds an M.L.S. from Vanderbilt University and is currently the acquisitions librarian at Western Carolina University. She is... Read More →
PJ

Peter Johnson

Head of Access Services, Western Carolina University
KL

Kate Lawrence

Vice President, User Research, EBSCO Information Services
Kate Lawrence has been uncovering customer insights for more than 15 years. She is passionate about learning the “whys” behind everyday mouse clicks, and illuminating the intersection of people and technology. She is the Vice President of User Research at a global information and research services company.
avatar for Cynthia Schwartz

Cynthia Schwartz

Collections Strategies Librarian, Virginia Tech
As part of the Collections team at Virginia Tech, I focus on analyzing and assessing library resources and collections as they serve our institutional research, scholarship, and teaching needs. I also provide strategies for marketing our collections at different levels.
avatar for Maria Stanton

Maria Stanton

Director of Production, ATLA


11:35am

The Open Movement: What Libraries Can Do
Open approaches have moved beyond open access, open source software, and open courseware to developments with open infrastructure and open processes. But open initiatives tend to be pursued separately by specialist groups, suffering from fragmentation and not having expected outcomes or impact.
The session will provide a simple overarching definition of open resources, and introduce a convenient framework enabling shared understanding of three different types of openness, illustrated by 13 examples of open domains relevant to libraries and information services. It will explain the common attributes, existing synergies, mutual benefits, and natural limits of open approaches, and discuss issues surrounding the development and implementation of policies and strategies to advance the open agenda, including current and prospective roles for librarians and information specialists in promoting openness in education, workplaces, communities, and society. The speaker will present resources and tools developed in her work, which attendees can use to share and compare their own experiences and plans for engaging with open resources and activities.
Attendees will gain a fuller understanding of the concept of openness and its relevance and implications for academic, public, and special libraries, and their parent organizations. They will learn about current developments and future directions for the open agenda, and they will be able to assess and determine their own future roles as educators, advocates, facilitators, collaborators, coordinators, and leaders of the open movement. They will be able to use insights gained from the session to strengthen their positions within their institutions and advance openness in society.

Speakers
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004, she became Professor of Library & Information Management at the University of Sheffield, then head of the Sheffield iSchool, before moving to the US in 2012 to lead... Read More →



11:35am

Tips and Tricks of Incorporating Industry Standards into a Library Collection
Professional literature on the incorporation of industry standards into a library collection is somewhat limited. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the intricate details of acquiring, managing, and delivering electronic industry standards to library patrons in a seamless manner. Lessons learned regarding vendor selection and license agreements will also be discussed. The background information that will be used for this presentation is a case study of a science and engineering library where the collection development librarians analyzed how collection policies can be properly developed to incorporate industry standards into a library setting. A quantitative analysis of the results from a survey administered to the patrons will be used to illustrate the results in combination with a qualitative analysis of the patrons and librarians’ experiences. The key points of acquisition decisions, avoidance of liability issues, and cost will be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Abbott

Jennifer Abbott

Serials/Collection Development Librarian, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
I graduated with a Master of Library and Information Science from the University of Western Ontario in 2009 and have been eagerly engaged in librarianship ever since. I currently hold the position of Collection Development Librarian at the National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, CO and am slowly becoming an expert in procurement and collection management. In my free time, I act as President-Elect for the Rocky Mountain Chapter of SLA and I enjoy... Read More →



11:35am

Toward Improved ROI: Outcomes of Researching Current Pay-Per-View Practices
This session features the results of the presenters' recent work to create an executive summary of current pay-per-view (PPV) practices, to be published by _Against the Grain_. Building on a talk given at last year's conference on the pros and cons of journal article PPV, the session summarizes the process that was followed and the outcomes that were discovered while writing the summary. PPV options are expanding as is the demand for them, and the presenters outline the current state-of-the art in this area. There are concrete benefits for the PPV approach for many types of libraries, as well as for content providers. Moving in the PPV direction can provide improved user access to content with better ROI on collection dollars.

Speakers
MM

Marija Markovic

Independent Consultant, Acute Source, Inc.
Marija Markovic holds M.S.LIS and M.A. degrees from the University of Illinois. For over a decade, she has worked in the corporate library setting as a copyright compliance expert, contract negotiator for electronic journals and books, and has directed collection development activities for global organizations. Recently, Marija started a consulting company focused on demystifying copyright law for librarians, authors, marketing teams and other... Read More →
avatar for Connie Mead

Connie Mead

Operations Group Leader, Wheaton College (IL)
M.B.A. from Loyola University of Chicago. Currently Operations Group Leader at Wheaton College, overseeing all aspects of acquisition, circulation services, and budget. Previously worked 15 years in publishing companies managing and marketing publications. Also lead a social service non-profit for 13 years and spent a few years launching a couple entrepreneur ventures.
avatar for Steve Oberg

Steve Oberg

Assistant Professor, Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Wheaton College
Electronic Resources and Serials | Wheaton College | | Adjunct Faculty | Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science | | Adjunct Faculty | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | Graduate School of Library and Information Science



Thursday November 5, 2015 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Video Games in the Academic Library: Wrangling the Rovi Media Collection
The Michigan State University Libraries (MSUL) acquired the Rovi Media Collection in March 2015. This collection includes over 700,000 music CDs, 170,000 DVDs, and over 17,000 video game titles. Such an enormous collection has had a transformative impact on a traditional research library. This presentation gives an overview of the acquisition, housing and administration of this amazing collection, with a particular emphasis on a consideration of the Gaming collection.

With almost no prior institutional experience with video games, the acquisition of the Rovi gaming collection meant that MSUL suddenly became one of the largest of such collections in the country. What considerations were made when we evaluated this collection? How did we involve faculty in the process? Why should libraries collect and preserve video games? And what makes a gaming collection a particular challenge for both librarians and users? As dedicated gaming programs become more prevalent on our campuses, many libraries may become involved in similar considerations and face multiple challenges with preservation, maintenance and use.

Attendees with established gaming collections, and those hoping to establish ones, should come prepared to discuss why this newer media should be a part of library collections, and the challenges that come along with it.

Speakers
avatar for Terri Miller

Terri Miller

Assistant Director for Public Services, Michigan State University Libraries


11:35am

We Are All In This Together
The DPLA is working with community partners to facilitate a national conversation about the challenge of ebooks. This past April a meeting was held in Indianapolis, bringing together a broad range of stakeholders to discuss how can a nationally coordinated strategy effect real change and move us all forward. It was clear that lessons learned through e-resource licensing benefit current patterns of ebook contract negotiation. Drawing on the collective wisdom of experts in both academic and public library communities, we are building a new path forward. A panel will present their ideas, perspectives, and contributions to this national initiative and solicit comments recommendations from the audience. Representatives from DPLA will also give an update on the ConnectEd Open Ebook Initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Frick

Rachel Frick

Business Development Director, DPLA
Community builder with experience in network building, creative problem solving and outreach. Strong believer in the power of librarians to influence change and build stronger, knowledgeable, empowered communities. Passionate advocate for open culture and it potential transformative impact on the creative marketplace.
avatar for Anne McKee

Anne McKee

Program Officer for Resource Sharing, Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA)
McKee received her M.L.S. from Indiana University, Bloomington and has had a very diverse career in librarianship. She has been an academic librarian, a sales rep for two subscription agencies and now a consortium officer for the past 15 years. A former President of NASIG, McKee is on the Serials Review Editorial Board, 2 publisher/vendor library advisory boards and strives to balance a busy career with an even busier family including a... Read More →
VP

Veronda Pitchford

Director, Membership Development and Resource Sharing, Reaching Across Illinois Library System


11:35am

What ARE We Thinking? Collections Decisions in an Academic Library
When faced with multiple competing priorities for investment in library resources, there are many important aspects to consider. From student enrollment to prominence of programs, there are both data-driven and intangible factors to weigh. In addition, most library collections now focus on the immediate needs of students and researchers instead of collecting for posterity. This just-in-time versus just-in-case collection development mindset prioritizes different resource attributes and requires an often unfamiliar level of acquisitions flexibility.

Where do we go from here? What are the most important factors to consider before subscribing to or purchasing library resources? What do scholarly publishers believe are the most relevant points to consider when academics make collection decisions?

What attendees can expect to learn?
Participants will learn what librarians should consider when making collections decisions – from the availability of COUNTER statistics to accessibility issues and beyond. The presenters will share a checklist of factors to consider, pitfalls to avoid and how to clearly communicate with our vendor partners. Publishers will learn what really helps academics make collection decisions and share their perspectives.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Cooper

Natasha Cooper

Collection Development and Analysis Librarian and Subject Librarian for Information Studies, Syracuse University Libraries
Tasha Cooper is collection development and analysis librarian for arts and humanities, as well as some social sciences and professional programs, and subject librarian for information studies at Syracuse University Libraries, in Syracuse, NY.
avatar for Linda Galloway

Linda Galloway

Collection Development and Analysis Librarian, Syracuse University
I'm the STEM collection development and analysis manager and librarian at Syracuse University Libraries. As the subject specialist for chemistry and forensic sciences, I connect students, faculty, and researchers to the best information available. I use data-driven analytics to make collections decisions and also involved with institutional research metrics. Please talk to me if you have found the perfect solution to manage electronic... Read More →
avatar for Doug  Morton

Doug Morton

Account Manager, Elsevier
Doug is an Account Manager at Elsevier, a world-leading provider of information solutions that help those in research make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries in science, health, and technology. Joining the company in 2008, Doug has worked with university and research center librarians across the US to maximize the value their institutions receive from their Elsevier journal portfolios on... Read More →


11:35am

What Role do Librarians Play in Innovation? An IGI Global Survey on Academic Libraries as Centers for the Advancement of Technology

Traditionally the role of the librarian as an enabler of technology advancement has been underestimated. Almost all innovators—faculty members, students, alumni, and industry professionals—have relied on knowledge assembled from library resources.

Today, more than ever, innovation is needed to fuel the economy. It is clear that advancements in technology specifically, carry the most opportunity to flourish in this ever-changing global economic landscape. From mobile technology breakthroughs to cyber theft, information science and technology issues are a central topic in the public conversation. Policymakers, economists, and other experts agree that in order to assure long-term economic growth, advancements in technology must continue to be significant in coming years.

IGI Global and our librarian advisory board seek to understand how college and university libraries can support technological innovations with an international survey. Findings of the librarian survey will be shared during the presentation and an infographic will be available for participants. The discussion will include profiles and examples of libraries leading technology innovation, including supporting innovation with programming, such as coding, gaming and robotics, and with cutting-edge research.


Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Hart

Cynthia Hart

Technology Librarian, Tidewater Community College
With varied experience in administration, supervision and programming, Cindy has worked as a public librarian for twenty six years in progressively responsible positions with the Virginia Beach Public Library System. For more than a decade, she managed the Library’s intranet and Internet sites including all virtual resources, services and digital collections. | In addition, she established and managed the Library’s social media presence... Read More →
LJ

Lindsay Johnston

Managing Director, IGI Global
Ms. Johnston is currently the Managing Director at IGI Global, an academic reference publisher based in Hershey, Pennsylvania. During her time at IGI Global, she has procured hundreds of titles within five separate imprints and has made significant contributions to content strategy and new product development. She has previous experience in educational marketing, specializing in recruitment and public relations. In addition to her role as... Read More →
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, College of the Arts, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers, faculty and students who are intriguing and dedicated to the disciplines they are engaged in. | | As a Charleston Conference Director I collaborate with other... Read More →
avatar for Jaclyn Ricords

Jaclyn Ricords

E-Resources and Consortia Relations Manager, IGI Global
Jackie Ricords leads IGI Global’s e-resources and consortia outreach efforts. Prior to joining the STM publisher, she worked in higher education for more than a decade teaching and directing professional development programs for educators. Jackie has expertise in digital resources, with special interest in e-publishing and online learning. In collaboration with industry leaders, she facilitated the development of a series of information and... Read More →


11:35am

Where Do We Go From Here: Choosing a Framework for Assessing Research Data Services and Training
Research data management has become a critical issue for campus researchers, funding agencies, and libraries, who have made substantial investment of time, energy, and resources into support for managing and sharing data. As data management programs proliferate, however, assessment of research data services has become a notorious challenge for libraries. How can we know - and demonstrate - that our efforts are having an impact, and how can we learn to make them even more effective?

In this session, we will present a survey of several frameworks for assessing research data management services. We will lead a discussion about the application of different frameworks for assessing or auditing existing skillsets, external facing services, and capacity to support an array of research data services. This discussion will be grounded in a demonstration of how we applied one framework to audit the NCSU Libraries’ “training ground” model, which serves the dual purpose of developing competencies within our librarians and supporting researchers in their needs to manage, preserve, and share research assets.

Through an active discussion of our efforts, and the efforts of libraries around the world, we can chart a course for effective research data management that can help guide libraries deep into the process as well as those those just getting their feet wet.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Hilary Davis

Hilary Davis

Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
North Carolina State University Libraries



12:00pm

ProQuest: New Content, New Platform Upgrades, New Experiences
Limited Capacity seats available

Sponsored Luncheon - RSVP Required

Join us as special guest speaker, Peter Brantley, Director of Online Strategy for the University of California Davis Library, presents “A Hollow Sphere: The rise of interactivity and the submergence of publishing.” In this fascinating session, Peter will show us how the act of publishing is becoming less important than creating opportunities for continual engagement. 

Plus, see how you can empower new levels of research and education success with ProQuest via:

  • Major new ProQuest collections and diverse content additions to existing programs — across all disciplines and formats
  • Results of in-depth user research exposing barriers in the research process
  • New Ebook Central demonstration
  • ProQuest platform upgrades and enhancements
  • SIPX, the most complete course materials solution in higher education.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Brantley

Peter Brantley

Director, Online Strategy, UC Davis Library
Peter Brantley (@naypinya) is the Director of Online Strategy for the University of California Davis Library. Previously, I was the Director of Digital Development at New York Public Library, and before that, the Director of Scholarly Communication at the open source not-for-profit, Hypothes.is. I have worked at the Internet Archive on policy issues and open standards, and managed technology groups at a variety of academic research libraries. For... Read More →



Thursday November 5, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Stars Rooftop Bar and Grill 495 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:30pm

Integrating Discovery with your Learning Management System
Limited Capacity seats available

Sponsored Luncheon - RSVP Required

Digital textbooks, social media, video content. It seems as if instructors are moving everything into online and hybrid classrooms except for the resources of the library! How can librarians bring the world of quality databases, eBooks, and other digital resources from the library’s discovery system easily and directly into the online learning environment? Why is it imperative that libraries play an increasing role in these learning management systems, and how can we meet the expectations instructors and students have of learning technologies?

This presentation will showcase how a discovery plug-in for learning management systems (e.g., Moodle, Blackboard, Desire2Learn, Sakai, Canvas) adds unprecedented functionality for online course instructors: the ability to create reading lists of library materials without ever having to leave the course site. The plug-in allows instructors to create library reading lists without grappling with permalinks, proxy prefixes, or PDFs, leveraging the value of the library discovery system in a frictionless environment.


Speakers
avatar for Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Information Systems Librarian and Associate Professor,, Millersville University
avatar for Eric L Frierson MSI

Eric L Frierson MSI

Director of Field Engineering, North America, EBSCO Information Services
Hey! I'm the team lead for discovery service engineering and integration for EBSCO. This means I can answer any question you might have about integrating EDS or the EDS API into your library and campus. I'm also a developer, building applications that use our API in outside-of-the-box ways, and love to hear new ideas for how library resources can be used.



Thursday November 5, 2015 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

#CRITCHS: Critical Librarianship in Book and Serial Acquisition
The free-form twitter community #critlib was created to host twitter chats about critical pedagogy, but has grown to address a wide variety of issues including assessment, gender in RDA, and many other issues.
This session will provide an introduction to #critlib and critical practice in librarianship, and then focus the discussion on how these practices can apply specifically to acquisitions and related fields.
The session will be highly interactive and engage the audience in discussions such as: how personal identities impact our acquisitions work, the uncomfortable praxis of acquisitions work, and how we can create space for deep and reflective conversations.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Drabinski

Emily Drabinski

Coordinator of Library Instruction, Long Island University Brooklyn
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Lead Librarian for Acquisitions/Budget Officer, Appalachian State University
Rachel Fleming is Lead Librarian for Acquisitions at Appalachian State University, where she manages the acquisition of all material types. She has previously served as Serials Librarian at Western Carolina University and Collection Development librarian at Central College in Pella, Iowa. Rachel has overseen serials cancellation projects, and complete collection reviews. She holds an MA in library science from the University of Missouri &ndash... Read More →


#CRITCHS pptx

Thursday November 5, 2015 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Big Deal on the Fly: Shoring up the Levee
Keeping up with “Big Deal” journal packages has put a strain on library budgets and the budgetary dikes are leaking. We are all reaching a breaking point, but who can resist the siren’s call of the “Big Deal” packages? This has necessitated libraries to consider multiple options in order to absorb the floodwaters in uncertain times. Two universities will discuss their different approaches in shoring up the levee. While one was able to find a solution through contract negotiations, the other decided not to renew system-wide access to their “Big Deal” journal package.
This discussion will outline several options and strategies in negotiating journal packages, and how to measure the impact at your institution by using statistics from a multidisciplinary database, Interlibrary Loan, and Get it Now to approximate the value and necessity of the big deal subscription. The discussion will also present possible applications for ongoing collection development decisions in an era of unpredictable budgetary tides.

Speakers
EC

Emily Chan

Scholarly Communications Librarian, San Jose State University
SD

Susann deVries

Interim University Librarian, Eastern Michigan University
SK

Susan Kendall

Collection Development Coordinator, San Jose State University
Susan Kendall is the Collection Development Coordinator at San José State University Library, a merged library with the San José City public library.  Besides collection development responsibilities, Sue is the coordinator for government publications and liaison to the College of Education.  Research interests include use of electronic government publication, patron driven acquisitions, and affordable learning solutions... Read More →



12:45pm

Buying and Selling Information for Libraries: What Both Parties Need To Know To Ensure Success
Both sides of the negotiating table are represented in this session led by David Myers, Matt Dunie and Michael L. Gruenberg. All three are well-versed veterans in the art of negotiations in the electronic information field. Both sides of the negotiating table will come away with practical tips and advice that will assuredly make the next buying and selling experience profitable for each.

All information professionals will gain a greater understanding of how to be successful on their next negotiation. Similarly, the salesperson servicing the library market will also gain a greater understanding of how to deal with the librarian so as to ensure success for both parties.

Speakers
MD

Matt Dunie

President, Lab Archives
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

President/CEO, Gruenberg Consulting LLC
Mike Gruenberg’s name in the Information Services Industry is synonymous with winning results – in sales team development and leadership, in performance and customer satisfaction, and in his own success in selling complex information services into demanding markets worldwide. Mike’s track record during more than 30 years in the Industry is headlined by the significant profit performance he has delivered in every position he... Read More →
avatar for David Myers

David Myers

CEO, DMedia Associates
David Myers, President and CEO of DMedia Associates, Inc., is an Information Industry expert, with over 24 years experience specializing in Strategy, Sales, Licensing and Business Development. Throughout his career, he has drafted, negotiated and closed over 500 domestic and international licensing agreements with publishing partners, customers and distributors.


12:45pm

Changing Library Operations
The session is an exploration of library operational adaptations to the changing technologies of information distribution and usage. The librarians will present glimpses of the changes occurring in their library operations as they transition to services without print. A panel of librarians will explore, through the evidence of their changing library operations, a range of topics, for example: trends in e-resource ‘acquisition’ and usage; changes in consortia; processing and organizational changes; and developments in open access publishing and library e-publication. After initial presentations, the panel will encourage questions, comments, and discussion with attendees.

Speakers
JD

Jim Dooley

Head, Collection Services, University of California, Merced
Jim Dooley has been head of collections and technical services at the University of California, Merced since 2003.  Prior to coming to UC Merced he held a variety of positions in technical services and special collections at the University of Utah.  He serves on various University of California systemwide committees including collections licensing, shared print and cataloging and metadata services.  He has presented at previous... Read More →
avatar for Allen McKiel

Allen McKiel

Dean of Library Services, Western Oregon University
Allen McKiel began his career as a programmer/systems analyst. The merger of his technical skills with librarianship occurred at OCLC and NOTIS. He has over twenty years of academic library experience first as the Director of Libraries for Region 2 of Indiana’s Ivy Tech Community College, then as the Director of Libraries for Northeastern State University in Oklahoma, and currently as Dean of Library Services for Western Oregon University.
avatar for Robert Murdoch

Robert Murdoch

Associate University Librarian for Collection Development & Technical Services, Brigham Young University



12:45pm

Combined Title TBA: Merging 'Text mining support: Are we there yet?' and 'Supporting text mining requests at your institution: what does it entail?'
Combined abstract TBA

Speakers
PC

Patricia Cleary

Global eProduct Development Manager, Springer
Beginning in 2010, Patricia Cleary has been instrumental in crafting Springer's mobile strategy. Patricia’s work in mobile technology has forged new pathways to empower science and medical professionals with the information they need, precisely when and where it is needed. As Global eProduct Development Manager, Patricia continues to pioneer new frontiers in STM Publishing by creating new products and services to meet the needs of... Read More →
LE

Laureen Esser

E-Resources Coordinator for the Humanities, Harvard Library
JF

Jen Ferguson

Assistant Head, Research & Instruction, Science & Data Services, Northeastern University
avatar for Kristen Garlock

Kristen Garlock

Associate Director, Education & Outreach, ITHAKA
Kristen Garlock is the Associate Director of Education and Outreach for JSTOR, responsible for education, training, and social media engagement. She has an MILS (1994) from the University of Michigan, and has worked at JSTOR since 1995.
avatar for Janet Morrow

Janet Morrow

Head, Resource & Discovery Services, Northeastern University
Janet Morrow is the Head, Resource & Discovery Services at Northeastern University's Snell Library in Boston. She earned her MLIS from Simmons College in 1984 and has been at Northeastern in various acquisitions, e-resources & technical services roles since 1994.
AR

Amanda Rust

Digital Humanities Librarian, Northeastern University


12:45pm

Data, Data Everywhere, Too Much to Think! Surveys, Usage Reports, and Decision-Making
This Lively Lunch session will cover a multitude of related ebook usage topics that small liberal arts colleges are experiencing:

- The complexities related to survey questions about ebook usage: the difficulties writing clear questions and definitions, and bridging the differences in usage across formats (print circulation vs. ebook usage reports.)

- The challenges of acquiring and managing comparable and consistent usage data: interpreting what’s being asked for in surveys, deciding which reports should be generated, and which statistics should be provided in response to the survey questions?

- The complexities of gathering the “right” data to aid internal decision-making. Usage reports gathered for surveys provide an overview of usage. More granular data is needed to inform collection decisions, and raises challenges for vendors and libraries.

Join this Lively Lunch to share your insights and practices!

Speakers
avatar for Helen Aiello

Helen Aiello

Acquisitions and E-Resources Librarian, Wesleyan University
BA

Becky Albitz

Associate College Librarian for Collection Management, Bates College
Becky Albitz is the Associate Librarian for Collection Management at Bates College. Previously she was the Electronic Resources and Copyright Librarian at Penn State, Head Librarian at Penn State Shenango, Media and Performing Arts Librarian at NYU and the Media Librarian at the University of Iowa. She received her undergraduate degrees in film and English from the University of Rochester, a masters in film from Penn State, an MLS from The... Read More →
avatar for Lorraine Huddy

Lorraine Huddy

CTW Librarian for Collaborative Projects, Connecticut-Trinity-Wesleyan / CTW Consortium
In 2008, I started coordinating consortial activities among the libraries at Connecticut College, Trinity College and Wesleyan University. My primary focus has been on collection development, and over time, I’ve vacillated from being an advocate of practices that favor ebooks to taking a more cautionary stance. The benefits seem increasingly outweighed by issues such as discovery, usability, shareability, and accessibility. For this... Read More →


12:45pm

Digital Archiving of Journals and Library Collection Development: The Long View
Libraries have managed the preservation of print journal collections effectively for many decades. Yet, as academic library collections shift to digital format and the conception of the library as a warehouse for print materials is increasingly challenged, the question of how we will preserve our collections shifts from the use of physical space to the use of virtual space. Central Michigan University’s journal collections are now 90% digital; we are adding little new material to our packed third floor print journal stacks. The question we now ask is: how do we assure long-term access to our digital periodical collections, including purchased packages of backfiles, when this content is hosted by a publisher that may go out of business?

Currently, CMU pays around $15,000 a year for Portico coverage. Yet, Portico only covers a portion of our holdings. Some of our digital materials are covered by LOCKSS/CLOCKSS, but we have, as yet, no relationship with either and are unsure that the self-hosting consortial model of preservation is workable in the long-term.

Speakers
KD

Ken DiFiore

Director Outreach & Participation Services, Ithaka
PG

Pamela Grudzien

Director of Acquisitions, Metadata & Resource Sharing Services, Central Michigan University
Pamela has many years of library experience in public services, collection development, resource sharing, and more recently, technical services.  This varied experience has provided her with a well-rounded perspective of academic library services, challenges, and opportunities. Her latest projects include a Technical Services workflow analysis and reorganization plan as well as involvement in the statewide shared print project called MI... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Ismail

Matthew Ismail

Director of Collection Development, Central Michigan University
Matthew is currently Director of Collection Development at Central Michigan University. He worked at the American University in Sharjah, in the United Arab Emirates, from 1999 to 2006 and at the American University in Cairo, in Cairo, Egypt, from 2006 to 2011. Matthew is on the Editorial Board of Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and Information Sciences, and is working with Katina Strauch and Tom Gilson on another publishing project... Read More →
KS

Kim Smilay

Director, Publisher Relations, CLOCKSS Archive


12:45pm

Don’t Share This Item! Developing Digital Collections and Services in a Consumer-Licensed World
What can my library do with a digital copy of a film? How can we provide downloaded video games to our users via Steam? Can we really circulate Roku devices?
Libraries have always faced unique challenges in providing non-academic content for academic use, but the digital age has brought particular problems of “one size fits all” consumer purchase models and vexing methods of DRM, wrapped up with a large bow of legal uncertainty for many institutions. Librarians Will Cross and Darby Orcutt bring their keen insights, deep collaborative expertise, and folksy wisdom to leading a discussion of how libraries can and should consider and apply the law, fair use, user expectations, and common sense in developing collections and services around digital content that is geared directly to end users.
Join the conversation to hear how your colleagues are sharing consumer-licensed popular materials and confronting legal and technical barriers. Share your stories about obstacles and successes bringing new technology and in-demand content to your patrons. And leave with a fresh perspective and new insight into the best strategies for this critical area of collections.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Darby Orcutt

Darby Orcutt

Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
interdisciplinary research | TDM/ computational research - negotiations and agreements | library liaison roles | user-driven collections strategies


12:45pm

Engaging the Skill Set of the Millennials: Librarians, Content and Technology in the Mobile Age
The Millennial Generation student consumes and interacts with information in a multiplicity of ways, at any time, in any location. Where Generation X took computer skills from study to employment, Millennials have grown up with an array of devices - from games consoles to computers to smartphones to e-readers to tablets. They read, message, watch video, chat, blog, photograph and tweet, interrogating and assimilating data across diverse formats. The speed and flow of information alters expectations and provides opportunities to research, share and learn faster and more effectively. This paper reviews library science and educational literature on the Millennials in the last ten years. It outlines how Millennials have been characterized and how academic libraries have responded to their needs, with special reference to mobile services. It provides examples of the functionality and services that currently typify university library apps and mobile-optimized sites in the UK and USA. The generational lens, it concludes, provides a useful perspective on key developments in academic libraries in recent times.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Hawthorne

Jill Hawthorne

Associate Director, International Development, Wiley



Thursday November 5, 2015 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Facilitating Sharing Among Researchers
Research is improved when researchers are able to connect with other individuals to share results, concepts, theories, and disagreements. Researchers thrive in an open environment where theories and results are readily available. Researchers are motivated by further scientific discovery, access for their informational needs, and promotion of their own or others' work. Non-researchers also gain expertise and knowledge when they have access to current research. Traditional publishing, however, is a snapshot in time for research results and inherently does not encourage conversations and sharing. With technological and social tools, librarians and publishers can facilitate sharing among researchers and the public. How can publishers and librarians partner to improve collaboration and sharing? This discussion will bring together librarians and publishers for a frank dialogue discussing the values of librarianship in facilitating open access to information and publisher considerations.

Speakers
CU

Clemson University Libraries

Dean of Libraries, Clemson University
Library collaborations | Leadership in libraries and public organizations | Developing and managing library spaces
avatar for Alicia Wise

Alicia Wise

Director of Universal Access, Elsevier
Alicia is very passionate about expanding access to information, and particularly enjoys developing successful partnerships across complex stakeholder communities. Her areas of expertise lie at the intersection of copyright and digital technology. She joined Elsevier in June 2010 to lead the Universal Access team. In this role she is responsible for our access strategy and policies, including open access, and for building relationships with other... Read More →


12:45pm

From Heart to Engine: Visualizing Library Alignment with Institutional Mission
One of the most common phrases used to describe the academic library is "the heart of campus." It's a lovely sentiment that makes everyone feel good: the faculty and students on whose intellectual seriousness it reflects positively, and the librarians who are honored to be seen at the center of campus intellectual activity. When information was housed exclusively in physical documents that were located in the library, there was even an almost anatomical logic to the image: students and faculty flowed into and out of the library as a natural expression of their teaching and learning activities. However, as the information environment has undergone radical change over the past few decades, so to has the behavior of students and faculty. They still use the library and its resources, but in a shifting blend of old and new ways. Does the "circulatory system" model of the library's campus role still work?

In this Lively Lunch session, we will discuss a different construct: the idea of the library as engine rather than heart. In this model, the library is conceived as a centrally important component of the college or university that actively pushes the institution in the direction of its vision and goals, by consciously monitoring those goals and aligning its programs and practices explicitly in support of them. Critical discussion in the session will focus on a visual model of this alignment and its implications.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
TB

Tim Bucknall

Assistant Dean of University Libraries, and Head of Electronic Resources and Information Technologies, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Tim is founder and convener of the Carolina Consortium, and an inventor of Journal Finder, the first Open URL link resolver. He was recently named the 2014 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year.


12:45pm

Magazines for Libraries and Magazines for Libraries Update: How Can We Help?
Since its inception in 1969 by Bill Katz, the goal of Magazines for Libraries (MFL) has been to help librarians with their selection of magazines and journals. The recently-added freely accessible online component of Magazines for Libraries, Magazines for Libraries Update (MFL Update; http://www.proquest.com/blog/mfl/), aims to cover new journals that may become part of the core titles in a Magazines for Libraries chapter, as well as niche and open access titles that may not be a core title for most libraries, but that may serve essential needs in some libraries. The objective for this session is to have a dialogue among the current MFL editor and attendees about journal collections, the role open access journals play in library collections, and how MFL and MFL Updates can provide the optimal information needed for librarians to build collections in 2015 and beyond.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl LaGuardia

Cheryl LaGuardia

Research Librarian, Harvard University


12:45pm

New Methods for Extending Access: Implications for Publishers and Library Collections & Services
As libraries consider different ways to manage their collection budgets, alternate acquisitions models are being considered, including demand driven acquisitions (DDA), evidence-based management (EBM) options, and reliance on Inter-Library Loan (ILL) and document supply (meaning purchasing or acquiring on demand). There are long and short term implications for both publishers and libraries. These include developing new relationships with vendors/suppliers and assessing when any of these solutions are appropriate and what the consequences of such choices mean. Library users increasingly expect nearly immediate access and that usually implies either ILL from a consortia partner or a commercial vendor that can supply the needed item quickly and cost-effectively. Reviewing usage data provides an indicator of need that may translate into a future subscription or acquisition or determine what long term solution is best for ongoing needs. Libraries continue to explore and calculate how to cover these costs either as fee-driven incurred by user, restricted to specific user communities (just faculty, and graduate students), and whether they are covered as part of the overall collection management costs. The increasing role of Open Access generates additional complexity and both publishers/providers and libraries must determine how to distinguish between OA content and non-OA content. Collection development models of balancing ownership, subscriptions with and without perpetuity, OA plus new opportunities for extending access at a more macro level with different providers reflects major changes for all partners in this shifting paradigm. Likely to stimulate active discussion about implications for library collections and the changing models offered by publishers.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ahlberg

Scott Ahlberg

Chief Operations Officer, Reprints Desk
Scott has decades of experience in content, document delivery, and startup businesses, starting with Dynamic Information (EbscoDoc) in the 1980s, and later as an executive at Infotrieve. He has served in various roles at Reprints Desk since 2006, providing his expertise in operational innovation, copyright and content licensing, and quality management. Mr. Ahlberg has degrees from Stanford University and the University of London.
avatar for Scott Bard

Scott Bard

VP, Product Development, 1science
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine Libraries
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies to promote better, more sustainable and more affordable online access best described as new potential in scholarly communication practices.  
avatar for Jan  Peterson

Jan Peterson

Publisher Relations & Director, Reprints Desk
Jan is a publishing industry veteran with an emphasis on content licensing. She helped to establish document delivery as a legitimate revenue stream for publishers and with her Reprints Desk colleagues, works with librarians to provide workflow solutions to expanding access to needed content.


12:45pm

Open Access: Models by Necessity, Models by Design
The various business models underpinning gold OA publishing today are models by necessity. There is a system inefficiency and hold-up based on:
1. the majority of budget paying for scholarly publishing is tied up in large journal subscription deals
2. it is hard to transition a content business to OA, whether or not one supports the principle, and therefore content businesses are slow to make the switch.

There’s been much discussion about the efficacy of OA models. But those discussions are severely limited because there is not equal opportunity in the market to experiment with OA models. Since the early movers BMC and PLOS, more recent experimentation with models beyond simple APCs is limited to small organizations and startups willing to take the risk (e.g. PeerJ, UC Press, OLH) or large organizations willing to subsidize everything (e.g. eLife’s backers).

How can we appropriately judge which newer models are effective, with low scale and little room for experimentation? Do the current experimenters think they have it solved now, or do they know their plans/models will change in the future? If they will change, when? What will trigger this? And can we move beyond models driven by necessity?

This session will explore some of the most interesting new OA initiatives and efforts efforts to bring viable OA products and programs into the market. The panelists will be provocative, and lively, audience-aided, discussion will cover successes in, obstacles to, and industry hang-ups about, achieving optimal OA models that are truly by design.

Speakers
avatar for Raym Crow

Raym Crow

Senior Consultant, SPARC
avatar for Susan King

Susan King

Executive Director, Rockefeller University Press
I also serve as the chair of the board of Chor, Inc which provides the CHORUS service http://www.chorusaccess.org/
avatar for Dan Morgan

Dan Morgan

Digital Science Publisher, University of California Press / Collabra
The University of California Press has founded an OA journal, Collabra (Collabra.org) and an OA monograph publishing program, Luminos (LuminosOA.org). | The Luminos program shares the cost burden of publishing in manageable amounts across the academic community. Collabra uses an innovative model designed to share a portion of revenue from article processing charges with the research community.
avatar for Lisa Norberg

Lisa Norberg

Principal, K|N Consultants
Open Access Network


12:45pm

Pushed by the Stream, but Steering with a Strong Paddle: Considerations for Streaming Media Acquisitions Policies
Streaming media, perhaps more any than other acquisitions medium, challenges librarians to negotiate stakeholders’ changing needs and balance these with rational workflows. This panel will explore the processes and considerations undertaken at two institutions to write streaming media collection development policies. The University of Kansas (KU) will share suggestions of data librarians need to collect and consider to write an informed policy. KU will discuss the results of a library user survey, conversations with campus stakeholders, analysis of title availability, and highlights from other libraries’ policies. Tulane University will share their written policy which addresses the library tradition of ownership in the midst of industry pressure to lease; the tension between traditional title-by-title collection development to meet local instructional and educational needs and budgetary and programmatic movements in favor of vendor curated collections; and, the costs and workflow concerns arising as institutions begin to host and take on digital rights management for owned files. This panel concludes with the perspective of an industry insider in current practices and emerging trends in the streaming media industry.

Speakers
avatar for Lea Currie

Lea Currie

Head of Content Development, University of Kansas Libraries
Lea Currie has been the head of Content Development at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008 and employed with the Libraries in other positions since 1999. Lea’s principal role in her current position is to manage the collection development budget, review and analyze collections, and coordinate collection development projects.
LH

Lisa Hooper

Music & Media Librarian, Tulane University
avatar for Tom Humphrey

Tom Humphrey

COO, Kanopy
avatar for Joshua Lupkin

Joshua Lupkin

Chief Bibliographer for the Humanities, Tulane University
With a background in history academia and museums, Josh Lupkin brings a strong interest in interest in the way that technology does and does not influence humanities' scholars use of scholarly resources. He is especially interested in the evolution of ebook platforms how to balance publisher, library, and end user needs in this area. He is also researching the impact of digital concsciousness on vibrant areas of alternative print culture... Read More →
avatar for Sara E. Morris

Sara E. Morris

Associate Content Development Librarian, University of Kansas
Sara E. Morris is the Associate Content Development Librarian at the University of Kansas Libraries, a position she has held since May of 2013. As such Sara works in partnership with the Head of Content Development to review and analyze the collection, makes selection and deselection decisions, and provide sarcastic comments during otherwise dull meetings. Prior to this position she served as KU’s American History Librarian for five years.


12:45pm

The Changing Academic Book Market Landscape: What’s Next?
The academic book business is in the midst of rapid and historic change, effecting publishers, book vendors, ebook aggregators, librarians, and users alike.

A panel of librarians, publishers and vendors will discuss the opportunities and challenges arising out of this change, discussing changing demands and exploring how we might best integrate print and digital into sustainable models and worklfows. Discussion will begin with the points below, assessing where we are today and where we will be in the future.

• What are user preferences for print and ebooks today, and how might these preferences change? Will books continue to be a significant part of the academic enterprise?
• Can libraries address their users' preferences for content type? If not, why not?
• How will libraries access or acquire the content or books their users need?
• What can vendors and aggregators do to help libraries meet their users' needs?
• Do vendors and publishers need to support a shift away from print paradigms or work to integrate print and digital? How do they need to adapt to the changing ways libraries are acquiring and users are using books.
• What business models will sustain the business of academic publishing?
• Do the ways we assign “success” need to change?

Speakers
CC

Christoph Chesher

Group Sales Director, Taylor & Francis
avatar for Carol Cramer

Carol Cramer

Head of Collection Management, Wake Forest University
Carol Joyner Cramer is the Head of Collection Management at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University. Before tackling Collection Management, she worked in Reference and as an Electronic Resources Librarian. She has also taught a credit-bearing Information Literacy course to undergraduates. She has a BA in Comparative Area Studies from Duke University and an MSLS from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In her spare... Read More →
avatar for Rick Lugg

Rick Lugg

Executive Director, Sustainable Collection Services/OCLC
Decision support for print book collections
avatar for Monica Metz-Wiseman

Monica Metz-Wiseman

Acting Director, Academic Resources, Univ of South Florida Library
avatar for Kari Paulson

Kari Paulson

VP and General Manager - Ebooks, ProQuest
avatar for Mark Sandler

Mark Sandler

Director, CIC Center for Library Initiatives, Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC)
Mark Sandler is the Director of the Center for Library Initiatives at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). He is interested in how libraries, publishers and users are managing the transition from print to electronic resources, with particular focus on the collaborative efforts of libraries to extend their mission to include content creation. He was a founder of the Text Creation Partnership, and has worked closely with the Google... Read More →


12:45pm

The Changing Nature of OA Journals: Helping Scholars Identify the Good, the Bad, and the Political
When the Open Access (OA) movement began at the beginning of the 21st century, librarians and select scholars saw it as a way to level the playing field by disseminating scholarly work freely, by easing the financial burden placed on rising subscription costs, and by offering alternatives to the traditional publishing model. Predatory and opportunistic OA publishers were quick to arrive one the scene, however, leaving faculty and researchers scrambling for a new and updated vetting process for selecting their publication targets. Jeffrey Beall’s blog and Beall’s List, along with other important publication directories, have become an important part of the effort to provide oversight and information to scholars about OA publishers. In this session, presenters will discuss OA controversies, reviewing sources, and the transformation of academic publishing efforts in the context of OA issues. Recent trends in librarianship demonstrate the need to educate authors on how to comprehensively research journals before submitting manuscripts to them, how to avoid predatory OA publishers, and where scholarly communication is going in terms of oversight and reputability of OA journals. Presenters will also demonstrate the impact of Mr. Beall’s list on both the publishing world and librarianship.

Speakers
SA

Susan Ariew

University Librarian, University of South Florida
avatar for Matt Torrence

Matt Torrence

Associate Librarian, STEM Librarian, University of South Florida
I currently serve as the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics) Librarian at the University of South Florida, Tampa Library. Along with the rest of the library professionals and subject specialists, I provide information expertise to students and faculty, with a special focus on the research needs of the clients and colleagues from topics related to business and technology. I work extensively in evaluating the resource... Read More →


12:45pm

Three Things I Wish You Knew: Surmountable Misunderstandings between Publishers and Librarians
Publishers and librarians haven’t always seen eye to eye, but when it comes to the ever-changing industry and adapting to new business models, they stand on common ground – neither is certain of what the future holds. Publishers are concerned with traversing this fresh terrain in a post-digital, rising Open Access era where the end user is king; while librarians remain suspicious of their intentions and stand their ground as a valuable player in the scholarly communication chain. But what if publishers and librarians came together to discuss what it is the other could do to improve upon the challenges they currently face? Could we enact change by openly addressing differences head-on?

In this session, a panel consisting of a publisher, librarian and industry consultant set out to do just that through a lively discussion of recent survey findings collected by Publishers Communication Group (PCG). This survey polled both publishers and librarians in PCG’s network built over 25 years with the intention of bridging the divide, improving lines of communication and coming to a mutual understanding of differing but equally valid perspectives. Attendees can expect to hear the top three things librarians wished publishers knew about their jobs, priorities and challenges; and vice versa. We will tackle such hot button items as budgets, price increases, open access, product bundling, usage metrics, institutional mandates, end-user marketing, and more.

Speakers
avatar for Janet Fisher

Janet Fisher

Senior Publishing Consultant, Publishers Communication Group
Janet Fisher has been in scholarly journals publishing for over 20 years, with stints at University of Texas Press and MIT Press. In 2003 she moved to Ingenta and then to Publishers Communication Group as Senior Publishing Consultant. Janet works with  academic and commercial publishers to support their marketing  efforts through research, telemarketing and content sales. 


12:45pm

Vendorbrarians: Librarians Who Work for Vendors and the Value They Provide to Library Customers
A panel of librarians working for different kinds of library vendors will discuss their unique and valuable roles inside their organizations. The session will be moderated by an Electronic Resources Librarian with an interest in library/vendor relationships. Librarians can add value to their company’s relationships with library customers as they share the same basic skill set as their colleagues in libraries and have a better understanding of their needs, industry standards, and the day to day realities of their customers. Participants will learn the kinds of roles librarians can have at vendors, how these positions compare and contrast with more traditional library work, their identities in the library profession, how library school did and did not prepare them for their jobs, and more. This will also serve as a call to action for vendors to hire more librarians to better serve their library customers. Attendees from libraries and vendors will be encouraged to share their thoughts and experiences with “vendorbarians.”

Speakers
avatar for Bob Boissy

Bob Boissy

Director, Institutional Marketing and Account Development, Springer Nature
Bob spent the last 10 years in a variety of sales and marketing jobs for Springer, and the 15 years before that working in technical support and data exchange operations for a subscription agent. Bob is former Chair of the International Committee for EDI for Serials, and Past President of NASIG. Current work includes carefully monitoring usage of electronic resources for academic clients in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region, and working on... Read More →
avatar for Jalyn Kelley

Jalyn Kelley

Client Services Manager, IEEE Xplore Digital Library
Jalyn Kelley is an IEEE Client Services Manager, providing training and support to IEEE Xplore customers in the central and southern U.S. Prior to joining IEEE, Jalyn spent seven years as a Research Analyst at Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) providing strategic market and technical research to IT specialists in the field. Jalyn has also worked as a News Researcher at the San Antonio Express-News and an Assistant Branch Manager for the San... Read More →
avatar for Charlie  Remy

Charlie Remy

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
avatar for Marliese Thomas

Marliese Thomas

Solutions Architect, Ex Libris
Marliese Thomas, a native of Birmingham, joined Ex Libris in 2013 following nearly seven years with academic libraries. During her time in academia, she implemented two discovery solutions for a state ARL, directed outreach activities for a private liberal arts university, and generally sought to learn as much as she could about how library systems worked. She received her MLIS from the University of Alabama and a BA in Communications from Loyola... Read More →


2:25pm

Altmetrics in Practice: How Institutions Are Using Altmetric Data to Enhance Administrator, End-User, and Staff Assessment Practices
The big questions many research administrators, librarians, and faculty are asking around altmetrics are:
1. What are altmetrics?
2. How are they being used?
3. How can other organizations integrate this kind of data?

The reality is that many institutions are integrating altmetric data in new and innovative ways to enhance the experience of their researchers, support staff, administrators, and institutional marketing/outreach teams. Join Altmetric.com and customers (including the National Academy of Sciences and Stony Brook Medical Center) as they share why they are investing in altmetrics, how they are using them, and what other institutions -- academic and otherwise -- can gain from integrating this complementary data into their evaluation and assessment practices.

Questions in advance? Tweet to @altmetric

Speakers
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Product Sales Manager, The Americas, Altmetric.com
Sara Rouhi has worked in scholarly publishing for seven years and manages sales and outreach in North America for Altmetric.com. She speaks and runs workshops on metrics in practice and the scholarly publishing process at library and scholarly publishing conferences worldwide. | | She is an active member of the Society of Scholarly Publishing's Education Committee and currently runs their Librarian Focus Group program. She was awarded... Read More →
avatar for Andrew White

Andrew White

Associate CIO for Health Sciences, Senior Director for Research Computing, Stony Brook University
Andrew has worked in academic/ research libraries for more than 25 years, holding positions as  Associate Director, Associate Dean, and Director. Prior to becoming the Associate CIO for Health Sciences, he was the Interim Dean of Libraries at Stony Brook University. Andrew is a member of Beta Phi Mu and holds a MLS from Queens College and a doctorate from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He has several peer-reviewed and... Read More →
avatar for Colleen Willis

Colleen Willis

Senior Librarian, Impact Services & Business Development, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Colleen Willis is a Senior Librarian, at the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. She is the project lead for the Library Impact Services, marketing and business development. She also teaches professional workshops for staff.


2:25pm

CC-BY: Is There Such a Thing as Too Open in Open Access?
Support and demand for researchers to publish in Open Access journals has been growing steadily among funding agencies, research organizations, and institutions of higher education. The Wellcome Trust and the Research Councils UK OA policies have begun imposing more finite restrictions, like publishing only under CC-BY licenses, on researchers. CC-BY, or Creative Commons Attribution, is one of several and the most open of all creative commons licensing. It most closely embodies the definition of OA, as established by the Berlin Declaration and Bethesda Statement on Open Access, by allowing for the most reuse, including the unrestricted creation of derivatives. Scholars have voiced concern that CC-BY may not be the best license for all disciplines. Libraries, as OA publishers, custodians of institutional repositories, facilitators of scholarly research, and organizers of information, are well positioned to enhance a discussion on balancing the needs of scholars for minimum control over their work with the goal of OA publishing to most widely disseminate information and scholarship to the public without barriers of country, class, access or financing.

Speakers
avatar for LeEtta Schmidt

LeEtta Schmidt

Resource Sharing and Copyright Librarian, University of South Florida Tampa Library
LeEtta M. Schmidt is the Resource Sharing and Copyright Librarian at the USF Tampa library, and the Editor of the Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, & Electronic Reserve. She is a member of ALA, FLA, and has published articles in CR&L News, The Journal of Academic Librarianship and the Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. LeEtta earned her B.A. in English Literature and her M.A. in Library Science... Read More →
avatar for Anthony  Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and is an associate of Oxford Brookes University and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of the Fiesole Retreats. He also consults for the Publishers Association and organises events and writes for the... Read More →


2:25pm

Combined Title TBA: Merging 'Butter Both Sides? : Recognizing the Potential Benefits of the RFP Process to the Library, Vendor, and Cooperative' and 'Every Dollar Matters! Using a Competitive Process to Select a Subscription Agent'
Combined abstract TBA

Speakers
avatar for Eileen Condon

Eileen Condon

Senior Associate Dean, Webster University Libraries
Eileen Condon serves as senior associate dean of Webster University Libraries in St. Louis, Missouri. In that role she assists with the provision of quality materials and services to students, faculty and staff in online programs, at the St. Louis campus, and at extended sites throughout the U.S. and in Europe, Asia, and Africa. She also serves as the head of the library’s resources management services department, overseeing library technology... Read More →
avatar for Carol Seiler

Carol Seiler

Account Services Manager, EBSCO
Carol Seiler has an MLS from Texas Woman’s University, earned at a time when the internet was young and the web barely existed. She started her career in libraries as a cataloger and now has worked in almost all areas of the library. She has primarily worked as an academic/medical librarian but did time as a public librarian as well as a Trainer for All Things Technical Services for a consortia. Carol has been with EBSCO Information Services... Read More →
avatar for J. Michael Thompson

J. Michael Thompson

Head of Acquisitions, University of Houston
After graduating with an MLS from the University of Texas, J. Michael (Mike) Thompson began his professional career as the Copy Cataloging Manager at the University of Houston in 2000. In 2005, he moved from Cataloging to Acquistions at UH and was appointed to head the department in September 2006. Mike has presented at the national and local levels throughout his career. He has served on numerous state and national committees, interest... Read More →


2:25pm

Creating a Start-up Business in Scholarly Communications
While everyone talks about the start-up companies coming out of Silicon Valley, there are many start-ups of different kinds in scholarly communications. Some of these are for-profit, but some are not-for-profit. This panel, which consists of the heads of three start-ups, will survey the special issues start-ups face. Where did the idea for the company come from? Why do this as a start-up instead of creating it inside an established company? How did you finance the organization? What are the key things that the leaders of start-ups must do to be successful? The panel's presentations will be followed by a Q&A period.

Moderators
avatar for Joseph J. Esposito

Joseph J. Esposito

President, Processed Media
I am a management consultant working in the area of publishing, especially scholarly publishing, and digital media. I work with for-profit and not-for-profit companies. Most of my clients are CEOs or Boards of Directors, whom I advise on strategy. My aim is to help organizations make decisions. Good decisions cost more.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Breeze

Jonathan Breeze

CEO, Symplectic
avatar for Sam Molyneux

Sam Molyneux

CEO, Meta
avatar for Dan Whaley

Dan Whaley

CEO, Hypothes.is
Dan is a coder and entrepreneur that created the first online travel reservation company on the web (ITN/GetThere) in 1995. He wrote much of the software, launched the business and guided the long term technical and product vision. GetThere went public in 1999 and was sold to Sabre in 2000 with nearly 600 employees while processing approximately 50% of travel transacted online. Dan currently serves as a director of Sauce Labs, the leading open... Read More →


Thursday November 5, 2015 2:25pm - 3:10pm
Salon 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:25pm

Evaluated, Removed, and Recycled – The Tale of Two Deaccession Projects Across the Disciplines.
How have two midsized public university libraries approached large-scale weeding projects in their monograph and bound periodical collections? Space is at a premium in academic libraries as new roles combine and compete with traditional ones. How can the collection be refreshed to promote more use? Where will more collaboration and creative spaces be housed? How does a midsized library refine the collection to bring better campus alignment? How should the project begin? Who should be involved in planning? How can campus faculty be included in the deaccessioning process? How is the campus perception of the project handled? What to keep, what to send to off-site, and what to discard? What do you do with all of those discarded books and journals? How to work with campus sustainability goals? Do ebooks play a part in what you keep and discard? How are different discipline areas handled when the book is valued differently? Are there useful guidelines like CREW (Continuous Review Evaluation and Weeding) that are applicable?

Speakers
avatar for John P. Abbott

John P. Abbott

Coordinator, Collection Management, Appalachian State University
John Abbott is Coordinator of Collection Management @ Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.  He previously served as North Carolina State University’s Associate Head of Collection Management with responsibilities for life sciences/agriculture, and as Texas A&M University’s Agriculture Librarian.  Before librarianship, he was a field biologist mapping vegetation in Utah and New Mexico and live-trapping deer and elk: all good... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Goode

Lauren Goode

Science Librarian, College of William and Mary
I'm very interested in developing research data services at my library. I am a liaison librarian for physical and natural sciences and I'm always looking for new ways to engage my community.
avatar for Martha Higgins

Martha Higgins

Research Librarian, College of William and Mary
Martha Higgins is a research librarian at the College of William and Mary. She earned her BA and MA in History at the University of Albany, and her MLS from the University of Maryland. She is the liaison to History, Anthropology, Africana Studies, and American Studies.
MJ

Mary Jordan

Collection Management Technician, Appalachian State University


2:25pm

Implementing Collection Lifecycle Management
In a time of ever increasing physical collection space shortages and rapidly evolving higher education institutions, a holistic understanding of the collection lifecycle as well as a strategic approach to collection development and retention as well as stakeholder engagement is needed. Some struggle with what materials to withdraw, especially if there is faculty opposition and how to move forward collaboratively. Leveraging the experience of leading the local culture shift in a large Association of Research Library, the principles, policies and methods required to shift mental models towards what must be retained, facilitating withdrawal decisions, and connecting collection development with ongoing collection management will be explored.
Audience members will leave with:
• An understanding of why collection lifecycle management may be beneficial
• key questions to ask themselves and colleagues when wanting to shift to collection lifecycle management
• an understanding of how existing policies and high-level workflows feed into the collection lifecycle management approach
• an understanding of the practical aspects of implementation,
• a link to a toolkit with policy templates, guides on collection evaluation and stakeholder engagement.
Largely relying on traditional presentation style, a series of poll-like questions will be used to learn about the audience and find resonance in audience members with the presentation content. Further, at the end of each section, a Q&A period will be built in.

Speakers
avatar for Annie Belanger

Annie Belanger

Associate University Librarian, Information Resources & Academic Excellence, University of Waterloo Library
Annie Bélanger is the Associate University Librarian, Information Resources & Academic Excellence, for the University of Waterloo. In this role, she provides executive leadership for collection lifecycle management as well as for information services, instruction, user engagement, accessibility and liaison services. Prior to this role, she held two Department Head positions; Head, Information Services & Resources at Waterloo and... Read More →


2:25pm

Improving Access and Discoverability of E-Journals with NISO's PIE-J
PIE-J (Presentation and Identification of E-Journals) is a NISO Recommended Practice that offers guidelines for how best to present e-journals online to ensure that the content can be reliably discovered, cited, and accessed by users over time. When former titles are not visible or incorrect ISSNs are used, access is affected.  Come hear representatives from two publishers discuss how they have used PIE-J to help them meet some of the challenges of presenting precise journal metadata online and thus improve the discoverability of and access to their content. 

Speakers
avatar for Sarah (Sally) Glasser

Sarah (Sally) Glasser

Serials/Electronic Resources Librarian, Hofstra University
Co-Chair of NISO's PIE-J Standing Committee
avatar for sedgwick martha

sedgwick martha

Executive Director of Product Innovation, SAGE Publications Ltd
As Executive Director of Product Innovation, Martha is responsible for the development of SAGE’s online products for the library and college market working within the UK, as well as working closely with colleagues in the US to explore new product innovations within digital reference.   | | Joining SAGE in 2008, Martha has played a key role in the development of SAGE’s online digital products and content delivery platforms for... Read More →
SV

Stacy V. Sieck

Library Communications Manager, The Americas, Taylor & Francis Group
Stacy V. Sieck is the Library Communications Manager at Taylor & Francis Group and is responsible for managing the library marketing and communications activities for North and South America. She first joined Taylor & Francis in 2008 as the manager of the library and information science journals portfolio and has implemented several open access programs, including Taylor & Francis’ Library & Information Sciences Author... Read More →



2:25pm

Interrogating Demand: Pathways Toward Purchase in Patron-influenced E-book Models
Libraries have been utilizing a variety of methods to acquire e-books for many years. Single-title purchase, Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) with and without Short Term Loans (STLs), evidence-based programs and package purchase all continue to be employed. The University of California is currently using and piloting multiple acquisitions methods at both the individual campus and systemwide levels.
Join four University of California librarians as they discuss what has been learned from a single campus pilot of JSTOR DDA, a single campus DDA plan with STLs through EBL, a systemwide evidence-based pilot with CRC Press for ENGnetBASE titles and a systemwide DDA pilot with STLs through ebrary.

Speakers
avatar for Harold Colson

Harold Colson

International Relations Librarian, U.S. History Librarian, eBooks Coordinator, University of California, San Diego
Harold has been a selector and subject liaison at UCSD since 1988. He holds degrees from Wake Forest University and Indiana University. Rumor says he cannot resist these conversation starters: Rolling Stones, craft beer, college football, genealogy, Route 66, Bernie Gunther mysteries, Moomins. (Post-conference research mission at LBJ Library: National Security File, Country File, Laos.)
JD

Jim Dooley

Head, Collection Services, University of California, Merced
Jim Dooley has been head of collections and technical services at the University of California, Merced since 2003.  Prior to coming to UC Merced he held a variety of positions in technical services and special collections at the University of Utah.  He serves on various University of California systemwide committees including collections licensing, shared print and cataloging and metadata services.  He has presented at previous... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Kegel

Deborah Kegel

Reference Collections Coordinator & Physical Science-Engineering Librarian, University of California, San Diego
reference, collections, engineering, computer science, math, statistics, physics, astronomy



2:25pm

Knowing Your Strategic Advantage
Where do we go from here? This panel will explore the fundamental importance of knowing the core competencies of your institution, company, or association, and integrating them into your day-to-day operations. Three leaders from a library, a scholarly association, and a for-profit company will give their perspectives on how their past experiences are shaping their vision of the future. Elizabeth Lorbeer concentrates on the challenges and opportunities of opening a medical library in a new medical school in the digital era. What do you buy or lease? How do you provide access? How do you allow for future library, medical, and virtual developments, or provide for “free”?
Christine Charlip, the director of ASM press, will share how business decisions are made in an old and established association balancing 27 scientific divisions and 35 local branches. How will they disseminate their content? How should they implement open access? What new innovations will arrive? How will innovation in technology influence content development and dissemination?
Justin Clarke with Harrassowitz will discuss how an international book and journal vendor manages to balance historical legacy with the discovery and development of new technologies, products and services. How do they maintain meaningful connections in the evolving scholarly communications environment?
These three unique perspectives may lead us to navigate more successfully through the unceasing change that is all around us.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Charlip

Christine Charlip

Director, American Society of Microbiology (ASM) Press
Christine has worked for four years to build ASM's publishing portfolio, adding ebooks collections, review journals, and new textbooks, including an innovative OA textbook to come. Her background in journal and book publishing includes the American Diabetes Association, the National Association of Homebuilders, and the American Gastroenterological Association.
avatar for Justin Clarke

Justin Clarke

Regional Sale Manager, HARRASSOWITZ
Justin Clarke is the Product Manager and Regional Sales Manager East at HARRASSOWITZ Booksellers and Subscription Agents, where he has worked for the past 11 years.  Prior to joining HARRASSOWITZ, Justin worked in Technical Services at Swarthmore College Library and was the SFX administrator for the TriCollege Consortium.  He also worked in Collection Development at Temple University where he set up his first approval plan with... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Lorbeer

Elizabeth Lorbeer

Library Director, Western Michigan University SOM
Liz is the library director at Western Michigan University School of Medicine, a new medical school in the U.S. to be granted preliminary accreditation from the Liaison Committee of Medical Education. I am interested in all things library and learning new ways to disseminate content using the latest technologies. I like hearing about new products from the vendors and cool things librarians are doing at their shop.
CM

Clark Morrell

President, Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc.



2:25pm

Learning Mendeley through Certification Program for Librarians
Mendeley launched a Certification Program for Librarians earlier this year and it has received enthusiastic support from over 800 participants world-wide. The Mendeley Certification Program for librarians offers a flexible, 100% on-line, self-paced learning structure in a 3-leveled program for librarians to learn about Mendeley functionally, technically, as well as the optimal user roll-out strategy at their institutions.
Librarians from both York University and College of Charleston will share their feedback and experiences as participants in the Certification Program. They will also discuss how the knowledge they have gained through participating in the Program enables them to consider how Mendeley fits within their library strategy and objectives to better serve researchers and students.

Speakers
YI

Yath Ithayakumar

Mendeley Market Development Manager, Elsevier
avatar for Rajiv Nariani

Rajiv Nariani

Science Librarian, York University
Rajiv is a Science Librarian at the Steacie Science & Engineering Library, York University. His subject areas include Biology, Kinesiology & Neuroscience. He is currently working on projects related to e-books, mobile devices, citation management programs & open access publishing.
JW

James Williams

Associate Dean, College of Charleston



2:25pm

Librarians, Publishers, Aggregators: Are You Missing the Boat on the Perfect Partnership?
The lines are certainly blurred on who is a content creator and consumer. Publishers create content and distribute out directly to libraries or through content aggregation partners. Libraries not only consume content but have become publishers in their own right. And aggregators distribute content in whole or in customized sets for and to both publishers and the libraries for the customers they all serve.

Topics include:
- How publishers,libraries and aggregators are jointly developing unique content sets that best target the needs of the academic and research community
- How non-traditional content, like blogs and tweets are being used by library customers that would otherwise be difficult to discover and collect
- The opportunities to license fragments of content including images and video and the value they bring to content creators and end-users
- The role of copyright-how all this activity can be done legally and easily

Speakers
avatar for Edward Colleran

Edward Colleran

Partner, Triumvirate Content Consultants
Edward Colleran has more than 20 years experience in the online publishing business and product development with a focus on global rights and licensing, collective rights management, marketing, market research and copyright. Edward founded Triumvirate Content Consultants with his fellow partners in 2014. Triumvirate Content Consultants specializes in assisting STM, scholarly and academic publishers effectively position their content and... Read More →



2:25pm

Library/Press Collaboration: A Magical Mystery Tour
The growth of library publishing and of collaborations between libraries and university presses signals a desire both to challenge and complement long established scholarly publishing practices. What problems might these perceived solutions actually solve, and how might such partnerships actually benefit their host institutions, in the context of rapidly changing expectations of students, faculty, and administrators?

This will be a presentation in two parts. In the first part, Andrew Barker and Anthony Cond will showcase an innovative publishing partnership between Liverpool University Press and the University of Liverpool Library (together with a compendious knowledge of the Beatles back catalogue). They will describe exciting initiatives involving article scholarship and etextbooks in an open access environment, and the implications for publishing.  In the second part, Tony Horava will describe a fruitful partnership between the University of Ottawa Library and the University of Ottawa Press for publishing scholarly monographs as open access. This program has broadened dissemination, use, and visibility of the press’s books.  Together we will demonstrate that library/press collaboration is here to stay and is ‘getting better all the time’!

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Barker

Andrew Barker

Head of Academic Liaison, Special Collections & Archives, University of Liverpool
AC

Anthony Cond

Director, Liverpool University Press, Liverpool University Press
avatar for Tony Horava

Tony Horava

AUL Collections, University of Ottawa
I've been involved in Collections work for many years, and have seen remarkable transformations over the years. The challenges around ebooks, licensing, budgets, consortial strategies, new forms of knowledge and scholarly communications spring to mind. Reading in the digital age fascinates me - it is such a sea-change. The Charleston Conference is always energizing. I look forward to connecting with many people and hearing new ideas and... Read More →



2:25pm

Research Metrics: Best Practice in their Day-to-Day Use

Which is the best metric to use to uncover the merits of the journals in your collection? Should this same metric be used to understand the relative merits of the researchers at your university? Will it also work to find out which of these researchers’ articles is most impactful?

These and similar questions are hotly debated in the world of research. Quite rightly, they elicit strong, often emotional discussion, and rarely, if ever, is an answer arrived at. This is not surprising since the effort and debate stimulated by these questions cannot possibly lead to useful conclusions.  Why is this?

Research excellence is sought after everywhere in the world, but what is considered “excellent” varies. Is excellence about being well cited by peer reviewed articles, about winning funding, or about making a splash in the popular press and/or on Twitter? Is it about working with experts all over the world, registering patents, making raw research data sets available for others, or is it about educating the next generation of researchers? Research excellence is of course about all of these things and more, and trying to reduce it to a single metric is counter-productive and potentially damaging to the diversity of skills needed to solve today’s research questions.

The multi-faceted nature of research excellence can be better captured by a “basket of metrics”. Complementing expert judgment by being able to draw on a wide range of metrics from a basket allows more varied and nuanced insights into excellence than is possible by using any one metric alone. It also enables different metrics to be selected to help to answer the many different questions that are encountered in research.

We will advocate the common sense approach of using a “basket of metrics”. We will present case studies to illustrate the value of this approach, and to form the basis of discussion.


Speakers
avatar for Lisa Colledge

Lisa Colledge

Director of Research Metrics, Elsevier
avatar for Helen Josephine

Helen Josephine

Head of the Engineering Library, Stanford University
Helen Josephine is the Head Librarian at the Terman Engineering Library at Stanford University. She is the subject liaison and bibliographer for the School of Engineering departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Electrical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering. She also offers workshops and consultation to all students and faculty on campus on citation management tools and research databases. She is the Stanford University... Read More →


2:25pm

Shotgun Session
1. I Need You to Need Me: Understanding User Needs
Katie O'Connell

This session focuses on methods for gathering and analyzing information about what users need from libraries and library vendors from quantitative statistics to qualitative feedback.  How can this information be gathered and how can it be used to prioritize future offerings?  Panelists will share their user needs analysis experiences from different perspectives-- a large university library, an image database/media management software provider, and a small special library.  The session will conclude with a dialogue between panelists and attendees about gathering and using user feedback.

2. “Interest” vs. “Impact”: Using Web of Science Usage Counts for discovery in the Social Sciences  
Don Sechler, Rachel Borchardt

In some disciplines in the Social Sciences, measuring and benchmarking citation activity can be useful for identifying the research impact of an article in its field.  But in many “slow to cite” or “low cite” disciplines in the Social Sciences it may be difficult to use citation activity as a strong signal of the impact of a paper. In the Web of Science, the item level usage counts measuring “reasonable, intentional user actions” can serve as signals of researcher interest in topics and particular publications. The presenter from Thomson Reuters will discuss how “item level usage” is measured and can be used on the Web of Science Platform. Rachel Borchardt from American University will discuss how usage count data from the Web of Science fits into the ‘altmetrics’ framework for measuring research impact.

3. “Everybody likes a roller coaster ride”:  Thrills, Chills and Spills – Visualizing 40 Years of Data on Budgets, Allocations, and Spending
David Sharp

This shotgun talk will use data visualization techniques to enliven almost four decades worth of historical numerical data on base and fiscal budgets, allocations, expenditures, inflation, currency fluctuations, and much more.  The data originates from Carleton University library (Ottawa, Canada) but will be supplemented, at times, by Canadian and U.S. contextual datasets.  Audience members will hopefully find some generalized confirmations in the data, as well as new perspectives by seeing numerical data tables translated into vibrant visual and spatial representations.   Librarians specifically might enjoy seeing how a representative academic library in Canada has historically evolved, perhaps testing some long held assumptions; vendors might find aspects of this session, such as the steady upward changes to ongoing budget commitments, insightful or helpful.    Strap yourself in, because in short, this will be a fast paced, up and down ride that packs forty years worth of stodgy materials budget history into 20 visually oriented slides and 6 minutes of talking.

4. “But That’s the Way We’ve Always Done It”: Shifting from a Liaison to a Centralized Model of Collection Development

Amanda Scull

This session will discuss the shift away from subject liaison models of collection development to a centralized model in a small academic library from the perspective of a newly centralized Collection Development Librarian. The session will address the limitations of the subject liaison model, the challenges faced during transition, and the functional realities of centralized collection development. I will discuss outreach, selection, and assessment as the three major areas where the change to centralization has required new policies and approaches to communication. Audience members whose libraries are considering a shift to centralized collection development will learn specific challenges to expect and strategies for addressing them.
 
5. Help, we started a journal! : Adventures in supporting open access publishing using Open Journal Systems
Anna Craft

The open access movement continues to grow, change, and offer exciting opportunities for researchers and content creators to share their work. One such opportunity is Open Journal Systems (OJS), a journal management and publishing system that is freely available via the Public Knowledge Project (PKP). But even a free software system is not without its costs, both to the hosting institution and to the creators and staff of individual journals. Institutions that wish to host or use OJS must be able to install, maintain, and support the product. And while faculty members and other academics are often experts in their content areas, not all of them are prepared to handle other needs associated with creating and publishing an online journal--including decisions that might involve article layout, copyright policies, graphic design, web design, and other technical issues. This presentation will focus on practical issues and lessons learned in supporting the creation of online journals using OJS at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). If you are using or considering OJS for scholarly publishing endeavors, this session will help you prepare for some of the possibly-unexpected questions and issues that may come up. 

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Borchardt

Rachel Borchardt

Science Librarian, American University
Rachel Borchardt is the science librarian at American University. Her professional research focuses on the intersection of metrics and libraries, and she has written and presented on the topic in many venues, including a recent book publication titled Meaningful Metrics: A 21st-Century Librarian's Guide to Bibliometrics, Altmetrics and Research Impact, published by the American Library Association and available from the ALA Store and Amazon... Read More →
avatar for Anna Craft

Anna Craft

Metadata Cataloger, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Anna Craft is the Metadata Cataloger at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Libraries, where she works with metadata for the library catalog, digital projects, and NC DOCKS, UNCG’s institutional repository.  She began her library career at the North Carolina State University Libraries, has served as Metadata Librarian at Western Carolina University, and is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library... Read More →
KO

Katie O'Connell

User Relations Manager, Artstor
avatar for Amanda Scull

Amanda Scull

Collection Development Librarian, Keene State College
I am the Collection Development Librarian and Assistant Professor at Mason Library at Keene; so in addition to my responsibilities related to the collection I also teach courses in the Information Studies minor and information literacy sessions. I am very interested in the intersection of collections and instruction, and have previously presented and published about online instruction, the use of LibGuides and institutional repositories in... Read More →
DS

Don Sechler

Product Development, Thomson Reuters
avatar for David Sharp

David Sharp

Head, Collection Development and Acquisitions, Carleton University Library



2:25pm

Teetering Between Two Systems for Managing Ebook Records
For more than a decade, libraries have had to manually add ebook records to their library catalog--a process that typically involved downloading MARC records from the vendor’s website, customizing them in some minor ways, and then uploading them into the catalog. With the advent of discovery services that let a library tick off from a list of electronic resources they subscribe to--databases, journal packages, etc.--so that that records for them can be found in the discovery service, it would seem that libraries might be able to get out of the time-consuming business of moving MARC records around. But how ready are discovery services to take on ebooks?

Drawing on our experience with Primo, we will discuss to what extent discovery services are ready for libraries to treat ebook packages in the same manner they treat journal packages. We will explore issues relating to the breadth and depth of ebook indexing; the frequency of indexing; the different ways some reference book platforms are treated by discovery systems; and the problem of ebooks that are purchased individually. Given that many libraries are still trying to bridge parallel systems for the discovery of ebooks--the catalog and the discovery service--this presentation should provide attendees with a deeper understanding of the challenges and a map for charting the way ahead.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Francoeur

Stephen Francoeur

UX Librarian, Baruch College
I am user experience librarian at Baruch College (New York, NY).
avatar for Michael Waldman

Michael Waldman

Head of Collection Management, Baruch College
Baruch College, CUNY


2:25pm

Tough Love: Guiding Student Researchers Toward a Better Future for E-Books
EPUB has emerged as the standard format for e-books due to its numerous advantages over PDF, including superior accessibility, enhanced navigation, lighter file sizes, and optimization for mobile devices. Both trade and academic publishers desire an EPUB output to meet the evolving usability needs of their customers and to streamline their workflows. However, there is little understanding of EPUB’s advantages among end-users and little appreciation for EPUB’s potential in academic libraries. Research has shown that most users don’t recognize the EPUB format, and prefer PDF due to its corporate branding and familiarity. This puts publishers and vendors in a difficult situation: continue to deliver PDF content at a rapidly increasing cost, both financial and in terms of usability, or risk turning users away by forcing them into an unfamiliar format?

This session will summarize how the various stakeholders view this evolving technology, and the extent to which they might take an active role in shaping it. It will present the reasons for EPUB’s ascendance among academic publishers, explain how PDF e-books present barriers to innovation and problems for accessibility, and give librarians ideas on how to integrate EPUB into research instruction.

Attendees can expect to learn about the EPUB and PDF formats from the perspective of publishers, vendors and users. Publishers should gain a deeper understanding of the challenges libraries face in terms of technological evolution. Librarians should come away with opinions about the extent to which they want to be involved in the transition to new, more accessible formats.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Fulkerson

Melissa Fulkerson

Director, Ebook Sales, Elsevier
Melissa Fulkerson has responsibility for ebook sales and distribution of Elsevier's Books portfolio through resellers and aggregators. Her focus is on ensuring platform choice for libraries and flexibility in business models while driving a sustainable future for ebooks with researchers and health professionals.
avatar for Emily  O'Connor

Emily O'Connor

Assistant Vice President of Academic Support, Rasmussen College



Thursday November 5, 2015 2:25pm - 3:10pm
Salon 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:25pm

Tradition and the Academic Library: A Critical Evaluation of Our Enduring Values Revisited (2015), by Michael Gorman

 A significant percentage of current library literature focuses on the technological advances stemming almost exclusively from the internet.  Michael Gorman, in his book Our Enduring Values Revisited, 2015, invites libraries and librarians to reflect on the library as a whole, for a realistic assessment of those “noble” traditions, enduring values and best practices that make libraries one of the pillars of the academic community.

This paper will discuss Gorman’s ranking of those values and traditions and critically evaluate their importance to the future of the academic library in a small liberal arts university.


Speakers
avatar for Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Coordinator/Librarian of Collection Development, De Pauw University Libraries
Joyce is an academic librarian (Professor) and Coordinator of Collection Development at DPU, where she has worked for many years. She earned both PhD (French Literature)and MLS degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Her primary services include assessing and selecting subject collections, crafting and revising policies for the development and management of resources for subject holdings. Her wide-ranging scholarly interests include... Read More →
AK

Azungwe Kwembe

Serial/Acquisitions Librarian, Chicago State University


2:25pm

We’re Not So Different, You and I: How Librarians and Publishers Use Statistics in Different Ways to Achieve Similar Goals
Statistical gathering and analysis plays an important role for librarians and publisher alike as we strive to predict and decipher end user behavior and improve collection development. During this session, hear from a librarian who works with a large university library consortium, and a representative from a major publisher, on how statistics factor into our workflow—and the stories they can tell about how content is being discovered and used. Learn about specific projects and applications from each side, and hear how analyzing end user behaviors helps refine everything from services we provide to institutional decision making. There will also be time for audience members to ask questions and share their own experiences.

Speakers
AL

Alexis Linoski

System Libraries Resource Development Director, Texas A&M University
avatar for Sarah Schulman

Sarah Schulman

Account Development, Springer Nature
Account Development at Springer collaborates with librarians to help achieve the best possible value from their content. We use an ever-expanding list of methods and strategies, including: end user marketing assistance, statistical analysis and reporting, implementation assistance, trainings/events, and more!



2:25pm

What Do Our Users Think About eBooks? 10 Years of Survey Data at the University of Denver
The University of Denver Libraries has conducted three large surveys about ebook usage and attitudes in 2005, 2010, and 2015. Each of these was sent to the entire university community and received thousands of responses. The 2005 survey was one of the earliest to examine user feelings about and awareness of ebooks and led to two articles, which are still regularly cited today. As such, it provides a useful baseline for understanding how attitudes have changed over time. This presentation examines the responses to the 2015 survey in depth and compares them to the two earlier surveys. This study explores general patterns of ebook usage, usage of ebooks relative to print books, and preferences for particular format for usage cases. Also examined are differences and similarities by discipline and by user type. Because the University of Denver has a very large ebook collection on a wide variety of vendor and publisher platforms, it is particularly well situated for a study of this sort.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 


2:25pm

Will it ever settle down? The Impact of the Rapidly ebook business models on libraries and publishers
The landscape for purchasing ebooks continues to shift at a rapid pace. The sales of print monographs continues to fall precipitously and digital sales growth do not fill the gap. Monograph use in digital formats is growing exponentially. The use-based models of PDA/DDA and STL have become a significant part of the landscape, reshaping academic library workflows and the nature of collection development. As these new models have appeared and been widely adopted, business models have struggled to keep up, both for libraries and publishers. Most pricing has been based on traditional print sales/collecting models, which does not as it turns out reflect how the new models perform. More content is being delivered to libraries than ever before and at a substantially lower cost, which poses an imminent threat to the sustainability of monograph publishing.
Publisher changes in pricing, embargoes and withdrawal from new models entirely require libraries to continuously recalibrate collecting strategies, workflows and budgets. And as library budgets continue to decline, the sustainability of libraries as we currently know them is drawn into the maelstrom. Without understanding the impact of models on each part of the academic ecosystem, we are destined to continue in conflict.
Please join a discussion between a publisher, vendor and librarian of these critical issues.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Senior Director, Institutional Sales, Americas, Oxford University Press
Rebecca Seger is the Senior Director for Institutional Sales at Oxford University Press USA.  She has been working with libraries for her entire career, currently leading the OUP team that works with, and sells, to all types of libraries and consortia in North and South America.  Rebecca has been with OUP for 14 years, and has focused on the product development, sales and marketing of ebooks, databases and journals to and for the academic and... Read More →
avatar for Michael  Zeoli

Michael Zeoli

VP, eContent Development, YBP Library Services
YBP Library Services, 1997-current | ebrary, 2005-2007 | Regenstein Library, Acquisitions Dept., University of Chicago | http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/virtual_conferences/eternal_ebooks/


3:30pm

A Conversation with Publishers on NISO’s Open Discovery Initiative
Several publishers have publicly declared their conformance (see http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/credo-gale-ieee-and-sage-declare-conformance-with-nisos-open-discovery-initiative-300103269.html) with NISO’s Open Discovery Initiative recommended practice (RP-19-2-014). Coverage of licensed content by library discovery systems has not yet reached its full potential, so cross-sector discourse and transparency is needed to ensure librarians have all the information they need to make an informed decisions about the search technologies they provide to patrons. Bring your questions and concerns to this open panel discussion with four publishers about their ODI conformance statements and checklists.

Moderators
avatar for Laura Morse

Laura Morse

Director, Library Systems, Harvard University

Speakers
avatar for Karen McKeown

Karen McKeown

Director Discovery & Analytics, Gale
I lead efforts at Gale, a division of Cengage Learning, centered on making the traditionally library focused resources Gale provides discoverable in the path of intended users - students, faculty and learners. Having a college aged daughter and being a part of a company whose legacy includes both the library and higher education publishing, I am most interested in helping to address cost, access, quality tradeoffs of affordable learning... Read More →
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Manager, Discovery Service Relations, IEEE


3:30pm

All about eTextbooks and Libraries: New Models for the eLearning Environment
Today’s students are increasingly squeezed by higher education costs, and course material costs are no exception. More and more students seek rental options or skip the textbook altogether and those libraries that had enough resources and budget have historically tried to support students by placing textbooks on physical reserve. More professors are assigning Integrated Learning Materials that live online and include assessment tools and project support. Libraries have long been essential partners in ensuring access to vital online materials, but supporting these new learning models is not as simple as keeping a copy of the textbook behind the reserves desk. Come learn about new models and new technologies from eTextbook publishers and providers. Learn how libraries--even those new to the world of instruction and teaching--are exploring sustainable ways of getting involved in these new initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Hale

Mike Hale

VP Sales, VitalSource, Ingram Content Group
avatar for Charles Lyons

Charles Lyons

Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery, SUNY University at Buffalo
Charles Lyons is the Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery at the University at Buffalo. Previously, he worked in the corporate library at Lehman Brothers and in the Science and Engineering Libraries at the University of Virginia. He received his MS from Drexel University in 2002.
avatar for Lisa Nachtigall

Lisa Nachtigall

Director of Sales Development, Digital Books, Wiley
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Publisher and Content Strategy, ProQuest SIPX
I'm passionate about online learning, publisher and library technology, and wearables!


3:30pm

Altmetrics for Everyone: How Recommendations and Standards Support Further Growth
Alternative assessment metrics (or "altmetrics") are a relatively new phenomenon in scholarly communication and publication, but their creation and application is very wide-ranging. Typically seen as a complement to more established measurements such as impact factor, altmetrics utilize fresh data from online sources to view and inform scholarship and many decisions connected to scholarly output. As the field continues to establish itself, there is still a plethora of innovative tools that are yet to be created, especially when one considers opportunities such as connecting this data semantically.

Come hear how the cross-stakeholder groups working under the aegis of the National Information Standards Organization (NISO)’s Altmetrics Initiative are improving the scholarly communications field by creating definitions and use cases to help create common ground among users; determining new output types for the application of altmetrics; discussing how to better apply and utilize identifiers in this field; and recommending quality measures to be used for data contributed to altmetrics practitioners. Recommendations from these working groups, who are also working with other related industry efforts, will be an important contribution to the further growth and acceptance of altmetrics-based tools. There will be ample time for audience members to provide their own views and practices on how altmetrics are transforming how communications and decisions are made.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Director for Programs, National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Director for Programs at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior to joining NISO in 2011, Nettie worked at Ex Libris, where she served for 11 years in a number of library and information provider-facing roles, working on link... Read More →


3:30pm

Collecting in Squiggly (and Other) Languages: Challenges and Opportunities in International Acquisitions
In these increasingly globalized times, more and more scholars are doing research on other parts of the world, leading to a greater demand for international and area studies materials. However, the acquisition of these materials presents challenges and opportunities not present with mainstream western-language materials. This presentation will focus on the selection, acquisition, and processing of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian materials, from the perspectives of two subject/area studies specialists – one a veteran, the other relatively new – and an acquisitions specialist. We will present issues in the selection-to-shelf life cycle, with examples from the UCLA Library collections based on our experiences and workflows. We will discuss the differences between foreign and regular acquisitions and talk about our various acquisition methods (i.e., cooperative programs, blanket and firm orders, gifts and exchanges, trips, personal contacts), highlighting both the challenges and the rewards. We will also touch on newer (to these areas) topics pertaining to digital materials (i.e., electronic resources, born-digital materials).

Attendees should come away with an understanding of the issues and processes related to the acquisitions of international materials. In addition, we hope to generate a discussion with the audience about alternative experiences and processes.

Speakers
avatar for Jade Alburo

Jade Alburo

Librarian for Southeast Asian and Pacific Islands Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
Jade Alburo is the Librarian for Southeast Asian and Pacific Islands Studies at UCLA. She is currently chairing the National Diversity in Libraries Conference. She is a past President (2012-2013) of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) and was co-chair of its 35th Anniversary Symposium (2015).
OC

Osman Celik

International Acquisitions Coordinator, Gifts & Exchange Section Head, The UCLA Library


3:30pm

Combined Title TBA: Merging 'Unevenness of Discovery: How deep can we go?' and 'Discovery: Beyond Initial Implementation & Participation…and into OPTIMIZATION'
Combined abstract TBA

Speakers
avatar for Scott Bernier

Scott Bernier

Senior Vice President, EBSCO
avatar for Christopher C. Brown

Christopher C. Brown

Reference Technology Integration Librarian, University of Denver Libraries
University of Denver, Main Library
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Manager, Discovery Service Relations, IEEE


3:30pm

Effect of Library Advocacy on Mendeley User Adoption and Productivity
Millions of researchers and students currently use Mendeley.com, a free reference manager and one of the largest academic collaboration networks, to support them in reading, writing, collaboration, and publishing processes. Mendeley is an easy to use reference management tool with only self-help on-line tools available for researchers. However, in the last two years, with its integration with Elsevier, more varied support resources have been available for new users.
Stanford library has adopted and promoted Mendeley for many years and have licensed Mendeley Institutional Edition for more widely university-wide usage for the past 3+ years. Stanford librarians, such as Helen Josephine, have been providing and advocating a wide variety of training and promotional support services to ensure that its researchers, students, and other users would know how to best showcase the various Mendeley features. Stanford library partnered with Mendeley to study the effect of library advocacy on user adoption and productivity. Through a two-phased study of 9+ months, we examined and validated the effect of library workshops and promotions on researcher support.

Speakers
MG

Matthew Green

Institutional Product Manager, Mendeley
YI

Yath Ithayakumar

Mendeley Market Development Manager, Elsevier
avatar for Helen Josephine

Helen Josephine

Head of the Engineering Library, Stanford University
Helen Josephine is the Head Librarian at the Terman Engineering Library at Stanford University. She is the subject liaison and bibliographer for the School of Engineering departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Electrical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering. She also offers workshops and consultation to all students and faculty on campus on citation management tools and research databases. She is the Stanford University... Read More →


3:30pm

Life Post-ILS Migration: How Far Have We Come Since Our “Go Live” Dates and Where Do We Go From Here?
Next-generation library systems promise new opportunities to expand beyond our existing methodologies and in response there has been a surge of institutions migrating to web-based systems. A lot of research and planning goes into choosing and moving to a new ILS, but what happens after migration and implementation? And how closely does reality align with expectations? This session will share the experiences of 3 institutions who implemented ExLibris’ Alma as early adopters and explore the ways in which they conceptualize the role of the ILS. Speakers will engage the audience on the challenges in effective management of workflows in a constantly changing environment, the continuous assessment of Alma’s relationships with staff, other systems (e.g., digital assets management, discovery), and impact on our users, and the potential for greater collaboration in the future. Questions and comments are highly encouraged from the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Flanagan

Susan Flanagan

Collection Development Librarian, Getty Research Institute
avatar for Moon Kim

Moon Kim

Acquisitions Librarian, University of Washington
AK

Ann Kutulas

Cataloger, Tarrant County College



Thursday November 5, 2015 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Salon 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Making Institutional Repositories Work: From the Frontlines to the Future
Editors of the 2015 Charleston Insights Publication, Making Institutional Repositories Work, will discuss some of the major issues surrounding repositories including: platforms, hosting, discoverability, open access, publishing, and assessment. In addition, members of the University of Central Florida Libraries STARS (Showcase of Text, Archives, Research & Schol-arship http://stars.library.ucf.edu) IR team will focus on winning IR marketing strategies.

Speakers
avatar for Burton Callicott

Burton Callicott

Reference Librarian, College of Charleston
I am the Instruction Coordinator for the College of Charleston Addlestone Library and I am interested in Institutional Repositories. I am helping to get the CofC IR, The Charleston ARC, off the ground and running and, with Andrew Wesolek and David Scherer, I just had an edited volume, Making Institutional Repositories Work, published with Purdue UP.
avatar for David Scherer

David Scherer

Scholarly Communications and Research Curation Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
David Scherer is the assistant to the dean of libraries at Carnegie Mellon University. Previously, David was the scholarly repository specialist with the Purdue University Libraries. In that role he oversaw Purdue’s primary institutional repository, Purdue e-Pubs, and educated faculty on open ac- cess and author rights, new models of publishing, and opportunities for open access publishing. Alongside his colleagues at the Purdue University... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head, Research and Information Services Dept., University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). | | Barbara was an Invited Speaker at the 2016 Japan Association of National University Libraries (JANUL) Symposium at the University of Tokyo where she presented "The Learning Commons... Read More →
AW

Andrew Wesolek

Head of Digital Scholarship, Clemson University
Andrew Wesolek began his professional career as Scholarly Communication Librarian at Utah State University.  In this role, he managed a thriving institutional repository, roughly doubling its size to nearly 36,000 items in two years of service. Wesolek also administered an Open Access Fund and collaborated with stakeholders across campus in the passage of an Institutional Open Access Policy in 2012.  Subsequently, Wesolek chaired the... Read More →


3:30pm

Money, Money, Money....Or Not!
Each library’s budget is unique, however providing information about the budget is important across all libraries and is a critical factor in how the library is perceived by its constituents. The cost of e-resources; what is and isn’t freely available electronically; and optimizing a flat budget in an era of escalating costs - all are issues often misinterpreted by the campus community, leading to misunderstandings and misinformation. Limited budgets, escalating prices, and new acquisitions strategies necessitate clear communication with librarians and faculty about the financial realities and complex decisions surrounding collection development.

Attendees will learn how one academic library initiated a program to educate librarians and faculty about budget realities in order to provide financial transparency.

Library administrators at a large public university met with librarians in a workshop format to discuss funding sources; allocations; expenditures; deficits; high cost resources; collection decision factors; and strategies for acquiring content. Librarians brainstormed solutions to real-life problematic collection development scenarios. Both an information-sharing forum and professional development event, the workshop served to update, educate, and generate discussions for both veteran and new librarians. Librarians then presented an abbreviated version of the workshop to faculty library representatives, giving faculty a realistic view of the acquisitions budget and complexities of collections decision-making.

This conference program will include time for attendees to brainstorm solutions to real-life collections budget scenarios.

Speakers
avatar for Mary  Gilbert

Mary Gilbert

Assistant University Librarian for Content Management, Towson University
Mary Gilbert, a Librarian IV with permanent status at Towson University, is Assistant University Librarian for Content Management, Albert S. Cook Library, and part of the library’s senior management team. Responsibilities include management of the library’s over two million dollar collection budget, acquisitions of books, e-books, serials, and e-resources; cataloging and government documents;, liaison and instruction responsibilities for the... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Nolan

Deborah Nolan

Dean of University Libraries, Towson University
Deborah Nolan has served as Dean of University Libraries at Towson University in Towson, Maryland since 2006. Her career spans school, community college, private university and public university libraries in Ohio, North Carolina and Maryland. She earned her bachelor's degree from Wittenberg University, master's in library science from the University of Pittsburgh, and doctorate from Towson University.


3:30pm

OhioLINK eBook Aggregator Study
In a world of instant online access and limited space and funding, academic libraries find themselves challenged to provide information resources with the format and speed expected by users. In this environment, obtaining and maintaining an appropriate mix of print and electronic books is key. As a consortium of 121 academic libraries in the state of Ohio, OhioLINK is uniquely placed to collect and analyze data on a large scale on behalf of the libraries it serves. To this end, OhioLINK asked five major ebook aggregators to present and discuss innovative acquisitions models that could help pave the way forward. As a part of this comparison, OhioLINK staff examined the availability of ebooks from the most-purchased university presses from within its membership at both the publisher and title levels. Results confirm that given the current availability and usability of ebooks from these major publishers, a combined and cooperative book/ebook strategy is required. This presentation will focus on the methodology of this analysis, which took advantage of commonly-used tools such as Excel and the open source software OpenRefine to complete the comparison.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Pawlowski

Amy Pawlowski

Deputy Director, OhioLINK
avatar for Joanna Voss

Joanna Voss

Collections Analyst, OhioLINK



3:30pm

On the Premises and Beyond! Managing Copyright Policy in the Library through Institutional and Technological Change.
We will discuss issues important to every library large and small - including the cheapest insurance you can buy, providing offsite access to library copies, and negotiating licenses with publishers to ensure that library resources are available where patrons interactions actually occur.

Libraries, librarians, and library staff are protected by a host of exceptions and copyright rules that are often not followed correctly (or at all!$. We will discuss easy, simple compliance with the laws protecting libraries from infringements made on the traditional library premises.

Further - the library’s work is increasingly off-site - virtual consultations, delivering materials off site - we’ll discuss different library models of delivering services and how copyright law can affect the depth and breadth of online services. What are “virtual library premises” and are they legal? What is distribution to the public - and how does offering limited access to digitized in-copyright collections affect library liability? Are library premises restricted to actual physical spaces or can we extend the concept of the reading room beyond the four walls of the traditional library? The answers affect every library - and their relationships with publishers - as we continue to manage the vast changes in services and material delivery that technological change has enabled.

Speakers
avatar for Brandy Karl

Brandy Karl

University Libraries' Copyright Officer Affiliate Law Library Faculty, Pennsylvania State University
Brandy Karl advises the University Libraries on national and international copyright matters and helps to craft policies to provide the fullest possible access to the Libraries’ collections. Serving as an expert in the University community for copyright, fair use, Teach Act, and other related issues, she supports the University's mission through outreach, education, and consultation programs that help students and faculty understand how... Read More →


3:30pm

Optimizing E-Resources Management
Librarians who manage electronic resources will readily testify to the challenges; from managing holdings to setting up linking, there is much to account for. What are the best practices to consider when managing electronic resources? What tools exist and how do they work together? Where, how can, and should, vendors assist by enabling better workflows and interoperability?
Panelists will draw from their experiences and discuss how e-resources management can be optimized. Topics of discussion will include the evaluation and assessment process, ordering, and customizing workflows to meet institutional needs. Beyond workflow pain-points, panelists will also look at the impact e-resource management has on users, including how e-resources usage information can inform services such as collection development, interface design, and instructional practices.

Speakers
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
So, I have this idea that we, collectively, and I mean ALL libraries, need to create ubiquitous tool to connect people everywhere to library content they can use. | I'm the eResources Librarian at the University of Central Florida. I've bounced around the academic library for 20 years, with stints in Reference, Instruction, Systems, and Acquisitions. | My work and research center on applying technology to connect users to content. I... Read More →
avatar for Oliver Pesch

Oliver Pesch

Chief Product Strategist, EBSCO Information Services
Oliver Pesch works as chief product strategist for EBSCO Information Services where he helps set direction for EBSCO's e-resource services and products, including EBSCO Usage Consolidation and EBSCONET Analytics. Oliver is a strong supporter of standards and is very involved in the development of standards related to usage. He is currently co-chair of the NISO SUSHI Standing Committee; he is member of the Executive Committee for Project COUNTER... Read More →



3:30pm

Publishing Our Own Work: Contributing to the Professional Literature through Systematizing Sharing of Library Reports
Library employees do research and investigation as part of their responsibilities in carrying out the operations of a library; however, much of this work is not published in the professional literature and is only inconsistently recorded in committee documents. As such, this work is hidden both from others in the Library who might use it and from the profession at large, meaning that other libraries were not able to benefit from it. To address this problem, the University of Illinois Library (Urbana-Champaign) established the Library Occasional Report Series (LibORS) in 2015.

The process of establishing LibORS included exploring what it would mean to commit to publishing and promoting the University Library’s work as an organizational practice as well as creating workflows, acquisition criteria, editorial guidelines, a report template, and a blog as well as other communication mechanisms. The LibORS team also had to make important decisions about preservation and impact evaluation, including the use of alt-metrics, for this digital only series.

This session will explore the value of this type of series while discussing the specific case of LibORS, including the challenges faced in establishing a completely new publication series. This session will be of interest to participants hoping to curate and publicize their organization’s work as well as librarians generally interested in the process behind establishing a publication series. We will invite discussion of others’ experiences establishing journals or series publications.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Crissinger

Sarah Crissinger

Information Literacy Librarian, Davidson College
avatar for Emily Hardesty

Emily Hardesty

Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
I am a graduate assistant for Research and Information Services at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I am a second year student at GSLIS, and my interests include international relations, community outreach, and French literature. In my spare time, I love to run half marathons and bake cookies.



3:30pm

Shotgun Session
1. Peeling Back the Discovery Layer: Web-Scale Searching, User Expectations, and Information Literacy 
Nora Almeida, Alexandra Hamlett, Helen Georgas

This session will examine how a newly adopted web-scale discovery tool at the City University of New York (CUNY) has impacted user experience and information literacy initiatives. Through a discussion of user experience based on qualitative interactions with students in various research contexts, search statistics, and chat reference inquiries, we will explore implications of web-scale search environments on reference service and instruction at three CUNY campus libraries.  We will touch upon institutional differences and how technological and disciplinary contexts impact customization decisions and instructional priorities.  Attendees will be prompted to consider how research environments and technology impact user expectations in ways that may contribute to critical reflection of their own approaches to information literacy instruction. We anticipate that session attendees will discover how libraries can analyze web-scale discovery environments and student search behaviors to enhance information literacy initiatives at their own institutions, while improving individual user experience. Additionally, we will provide practical instructional strategies for use in reference consultations, one-shot instruction sessions, and credit courses that attendees can adapt for use at their own campuses.

2. Collection Development and External Data: An Opportunity
David Brennan

Many library systems and analysis tools focus on reporting library holdings and use metrics. There are fewer tools that allow for comparing holdings to external data such as bibliographies and vendor packages for the purposes of collection assessment and development. This session describes the experience of the George T. Harrell Health Sciences Library, Penn State Hershey, in developing a tool to compare this external data to holdings using the SIRSI WebServices API. It is intended to encourage the audience to investigate what APIs are available to them for developing tools for their own environments.

3. VHS, DVD, Streaming Video: One Library’s Dilemma
Ibironke Lawal, Emily Davis Winthrop

Video Home System (VHS) videocassettes appeared in our homes in the 1970’s, changing the discourse of the television and movie industry. It was a welcome phenomenon for libraries. Before VHS, there was the U-Matic format, which did not last very long because of the cost and limited storage. After surviving the competition with Betamax, VHS became the standard format between the 1970’s and 1995 when DVD’s were invented. DVD’s (Digital Versatile Disc) as the name implies can be played on multiple types of players and they offer higher storage capacity. Gradually, DVD’s became the default for libraries and VHS cassettes slowly became obsolete. Libraries are now transitioning to the streaming media. Streaming media is multimedia that is constantly received by and presented to an end-user in real time as it is delivered by the provider. With these three formats in the collection libraries face the dilemma of what to do with the old (DVD), the older (VHS), and the oldest U-Matic. At Virginia Commonwealth University, we have over three thousand VHS tapes. This summer, we decided to review our VHS collection. We have more questions than answers. This presentation, apart from giving the workflow of our activity, creates an opportunity for librarians and vendors to continue the conversation of addressing this dilemma. 

4. Less is More...Likely: Lessons from Departmental Libraries in the Decreasing World of Library Space
Corey Seeman
 
The shrinking library is not news.  Academic libraries have been responding to space constraints for many years, especially in the context of increasing student spaces or alleviating space constraints elsewhere at the university of college.  Shrinking footprints have not only reduced library's capacity to manage a print collection, it has potentially changed it role on campus.  While the print age heralded the library as a repository of knowledge, we have seen it transform into academic student centers.   And while many libraries may chart their own course in bringing on new services and creating new student spaces, many departmental libraries have been forced to space reductions based on other needs at their respective schools. The more ambitious the school, the more programs formed and space needed to house them.  While many will assume this is the plight of the departmental library, responding to space contractions will impact all academic libraries in time.  Exploring the contractions made at these business, medical and science libraries, we can see a glimpse of what the future might hold for many academic libraries.  This presentation will explore space contractions in departmental libraries and how they responded on both the collection and service aspects of library work.  In addition, we will explore how this trend might expand to colleges and universities' main libraries.

5. The User-Driven Collection 4.0: To Infinity and Beyond
Darby Orcutt 

For more than a decade, the NCSU Libraries has had some level of user-driven collecting, beginning with very small-scale programs and leading up to full-scale e-preferred Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) plans. Over the last two years, however, we have rapidly increased our reliance on user-driven selection far beyond vendor-side DDA programs, developing an in-house Books By Request (BBR) program, and working with our primary book vendor to engineer approval plans in novel and unique ways (for which their current systems were not designed) to support the automated curation of DDA and BBR pools. The results thus far include: better aligning monographic expenditures with documented user needs, greatly increasing the acquisition of books in electronic versus print format, and eliminating most title-by-title selection decisions, thus freeing subject specialist time for new and more strategic work.Participants in this session can expect a rapid-fire introduction to new methods of crafting user-driven selection pools, see quantifiable results from implementing these, and learn the challenges of implementing such a plan within a publishing and vendor landscape that is not yet designed to support it. 

Speakers
avatar for Nora Almeida

Nora Almeida

Instruction Librarian, New York City College of Technology, CUNY
avatar for Helen Georgas

Helen Georgas

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Brooklyn College, CUNY
avatar for Alexandra Hamlett

Alexandra Hamlett

Assistant Professor, Information Literacy Services & Instruction, Stella and Charles Guttman Community College
avatar for Ibironke Lawal

Ibironke Lawal

Science & Engineering Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
I have been at VCU for over a decade as collections librarian and liaison to the School of Engineering and science departments in the College of Humanities and Sciences. Providing effective service to students, moving them toward academic excellence, assisting faculty to reach their career goals are the things that motivate me. Apart from my regular duties, I have worked as chair of Diversity Plan Task Force and LibQUAL+TMTask Force, and member... Read More →
avatar for Darby Orcutt

Darby Orcutt

Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
interdisciplinary research | TDM/ computational research - negotiations and agreements | library liaison roles | user-driven collections strategies
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan, Ross School of Business
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction project in 2016. Corey has been director since October 2006 and previously worked as the Associate Dean for Resource and Systems Management at the... Read More →


3:30pm

Size, Perception, and Power in Library/Vendor Relations
Our perceptions of ourselves and our roles deeply impact how we execute our job duties. This panel will explore the perceptions about vendor relations and librarian roles with special attention to the size of institution. Librarians from academic libraries ranging in size from very small to very large will discuss their perceptions and address questions such as: Do large libraries and major accounts get what they need while small schools get what is offered? Do institutions who “pull weight” with vendors have an obligation to other libraries? How much agency, autonomy, and weight does one library or librarian have? Throughout, we will examine our perceptions of our roles and the relationship to draw out the real impact that those perceptions have on our work. The audience will engage with the panel throughout the session.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Lead Librarian for Acquisitions/Budget Officer, Appalachian State University
Rachel Fleming is Lead Librarian for Acquisitions at Appalachian State University, where she manages the acquisition of all material types. She has previously served as Serials Librarian at Western Carolina University and Collection Development librarian at Central College in Pella, Iowa. Rachel has overseen serials cancellation projects, and complete collection reviews. She holds an MA in library science from the University of Missouri &ndash... Read More →
avatar for Heather Wilson

Heather Wilson

Acquisitions & Electronic Resources Librarian, Caltech Library


3:30pm

The Role of Discovery and its Relationship with the ILS
There's been much ado about the role of the Integrated Library System (ILS). Traditionally, the ILS of course has played an important role in both the management and accessibility of library resources. This role was based predominantly on the need to catalog, acquire and circulate print items. Yet in the course of time, the focus has shifted increasingly towards digital items. And with this trend, the end-user expectations have shifted as well. Today, end-users expect (demand) an experience on the library’s website to be as agreeable as (and probably better than) elsewhere. As end-users we expect to find relevant information easily. Plain and simple.
This panel will look at the key role of the discovery service and its relationship with the ILS in supporting the library’s mission. The front-end discovery service is, after all, the gateway to the library’s resources where the user experience (read: retention) is effective or not. Panelist will ask the question: how central is the discovery service to the library’s mission? How should the ILS support discovery? And how can libraries best assess and choose the discovery service independent from the ILS back-end?

Speakers
avatar for Neil Block

Neil Block

Vice President for Discovery Innovation, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for Elizabeth  Leonard

Elizabeth Leonard

Asst. Dean for Info. Technologies and Collection Services, Seton Hall University
TM

Tim McGeary

Associate University Librarian for IT, Duke University


3:30pm

Think Bricks and Mortar Don't Matter? Usage of Library Resources During Our Year of Renovation
We began to plan for the closure of our library for a year-long renovation by adding significantly to our e-book holdings, and switching many print journals to e-only. All public services were moved to another building; classrooms and remote study areas were set up in other buildings; and overnight material pulls from the library were set up. We will show how acquisitions, reference, circulation, and database usage were affected by the renovation. What we expected and what we discovered were two very different things.

Speakers
KG

Kathy Gehring

Research & Instruction Librarian, Connecticut College
MH

Melodie Hamilton

E-Resources Librarian, Connecticut College
LM

Lorraine McKinney

Acquisitions Supervisor, Connecticut College


Thursday November 5, 2015 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Salon 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Try Try Again: Better Faculty Outreach through Trial and Error
Reaching out to faculty about library resources and services is an ongoing and sometimes mysterious process for librarians and vendors alike—one that, when effective, can contribute to higher ROI and improved collaboration between libraries and publishers. However, it can be challenging to reach that sweet spot between “effective” and “annoying”, especially in the face of seemingly non-responsive faculty. During this session, hear specific examples of outreach trial and error from three unique perspectives: a subject librarian, a head of resource acquisition and discovery, and a publisher representative. Learn how all sides qualify and measure success, how to venture outside your comfort zone, and best practices for marketing library resources to faculty. There will also be time for audience members to ask questions and share their own experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Schulman

Sarah Schulman

Account Development, Springer Nature
Account Development at Springer collaborates with librarians to help achieve the best possible value from their content. We use an ever-expanding list of methods and strategies, including: end user marketing assistance, statistical analysis and reporting, implementation assistance, trainings/events, and more!


4:15pm

Refreshment Break
Thursday November 5, 2015 4:15pm - 4:45pm
TBA

4:45pm

Innovation in Open Access Monographs, Archives and Journals
If one were to review the past 10 years of conference proceedings and published papers discussing open access in the production of scholarly content, she would find relatively little on business model and publishing model innovation. Most of the scholarly conversation has been around article processing charges for journals, embargo periods, and the role of governmental and institutional funding and purchasing. But business and publishing model innovation is alive and well in open access and will be an increasingly potent force for advancing the cause of open access beyond journals and into all forms of scholarly content from primary data to monographs to archives and beyond.
In this panel we bring together three voices from the publishing industry to share stories of innovation in journal, monograph and archive open access publishing. Alison Mudditt Director, University of California Press, David Parker Publisher, Alexander Street and Brian Hole, Founder and CEO of Ubiquity Press, will discuss the state of open access they found when they surveyed the respective publishing space they operate in (monographs, archives and journals), how they responded with the current new open access model they have offered to the university library space and close with musings on what the future may bring as open access keeps evolving.
Rick Anderson, Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections of the University of Utah will synthesize the various open access publishing perspectives presented by the panelists in a summary discussion and moderated question and answer session.

Moderators
avatar for David Parker

David Parker

VP, Editorial & Licensing, Alexander Street a ProQuest Company
David Parker is VP Editorial and Licensing for Alexander Street – the leading provider of video, multi-media databases and unique, curated content to the global university library market. Prior to his role with Alexander Street, David founded Business Expert Press and served as the President of Business Expert Press and its sister company, Momentum Press. BEP and MP specialize in applied, concise ebooks for advanced business and engineering... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
avatar for Brian Hole

Brian Hole

Founder and CEO, Ubiquity Press
Ubiquity Press is a pure open access publisher of journals, books and research data. We operate a highly cost-efficient platform that we also make available to university presses, library publishing programmes, and society publishers, through the Ubiquity Partner Network. | We believe in a bright future for the university press and researcher-led publishing, and are working hard to help make it happen!


4:45pm

Shared Print in the Orbis Cascade Alliance and Colorado Alliance
Shared Print programs are one of the most important collaborative activities being pursued by many regional library groups. The Orbis Cascade Alliance (Oregon, Washington, and Idaho) and Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (Colorado and Wyoming) each have multi-state regional programs which demonstrate unique characteristics and features. In the Orbis Cascade Alliance, librarians are having to re-visit historic shared purchases. They will explore one such project and examine steps taken to reconcile current institutional needs with past collection-building priorities. In the Colorado Alliance shared print program, a locally developed analysis tool called Gold Rush Library Content Comparison System has been developed to assist libraries in making better decisions about their shared print commitments.  The Colorado program will be reviewed, followed by a look at its analysis tool in terms of its underlying design principles, features, and challenges.  Different use cases will be explored as well as future opportunities for collaboration and development. As Shared Print programs expand and mature in the 21st Century, this presentation will outline some overall best practices for the ways in which we approach and manage these resource sharing agreements.

Speakers
avatar for Xan  Arch

Xan Arch

Director of Collection Services, Reed College
JB

James Bunnelle

Acquisitions/Collection Development Librarian, Lewis & Clark College
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University
YF

Yem Fong

Professor & Director, Scholarly Resource Development, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries
GM

George Machovec

Executive Director, Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries


4:45pm

Text & Data Mining Contracts - The Issues & The Needs
For background see http://www.against-the-grain.com/2015/05/newschannel-original-text-mining-partnering-to-open-new-doors-to-big-data-research/

Last year Elsevier released new contract terms for Text & Data Mining of their collections. This was met with criticism and confusion. So, how is a library best able to contract for TDM to support their researchers? Hear from a key vendor, a consultant with experience in working out these agreements and the head of LIBER, a European collaboration that is working aggressively to resolve the issues that continue to confound most academics today.

Moderators
NH

Nancy Herther

Social Sciences Librarian, University of Minnesota

Speakers
IH

Iris Hanney

Consultant, Unlimited Priorities
SR

Susan Reilly

Executive Director, LIBER – Reinventing the Library for the Future
avatar for Alicia Wise

Alicia Wise

Director of Universal Access, Elsevier
Alicia is very passionate about expanding access to information, and particularly enjoys developing successful partnerships across complex stakeholder communities. Her areas of expertise lie at the intersection of copyright and digital technology. She joined Elsevier in June 2010 to lead the Universal Access team. In this role she is responsible for our access strategy and policies, including open access, and for building relationships with other... Read More →



6:00pm

Networking Happy Hour
Mix and mingle with other conference attendees over a beverage and a snack while visiting the Poster Sessions. Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available to purchase beverages.

6:00pm

A Crossroads for Collection Development and Assessment, and Its’ “Fallout.” Where Do We Go From Gere?
My poster session will demonstrate with tightening budgets, changing workflows, and other pressures, we’re at an important crossroads for collection development and assessment, and its’ “fallout.” Where do we go from here?

Withdrawals, transfers, replacements, and gifts, all are key factors in collection maintenance and development. At the Albertson Library we have found that weeded collections and unneeded gifts open new horizons, which impact global literacy and contribute to the quality of life. Change and assessment must be sustainable; it must create its own momentum.

Poster highlights: Literacy partnerships are two-way relationships involving mutual planning and conduct of programs and projects. We believe that education and access to books are basic human rights. Working together, with our literacy partners, we cycle many of our withdrawn titles to help fund high-impact literacy projects. By finding old books new homes, we have created a sustainable solution for diverting books from landfills. BWB Donations and Discards program helps us manage and ease our workflows related to withdrawn books and unneeded gifts. We’ve partnered with Better World Books (BWB) http://www.betterworldbooks.com/ and our nonprofit literacy program, the Wisconsin/Nicaragua Partners of the Americas, Inc. http://www.wisnic.org/. The Library Book Sale includes selected gift books and older withdrawn titles of higher value. A percentage of proceeds from BWB and the Library Book sale are shared with - the Wisconsin/Nicaragua Partners of the Americas. The Library’s share of proceeds is used to support the purchase of CORE (Resources for College Library) items, thus enhancing key needs of our collections.

Speakers
TR

Tom Reich

Collection Development Coordinator/Head of Acquisitions, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point


6:00pm

Assessing DDA: Measuring Success for Strategic Objectives
As is common with other academic libraries, Case Western Reserve University spends approximately 20% of its annual materials budget on monographs and 80% on serial purchases. However, with a mostly flat budget and serial inflation, selecting librarians must be hyper-aware of monographic purchasing decisions and their justification. In 2012, the Kelvin Smith Library conducted a Demand-Driven Acquisitions pilot for both physical and electronic books in an effort to offer a breadth of scholarly material to faculty and students in a cost-effective way. This poster presentation will cover assessment of the DDA pilot as it compares to firm order titles purchased within the two year time period in which the DDA pilot ran. Considerations will include user format preference, circulation and usage statistics, cost-per-use, peer comparisons, user behavior, and strategic decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Church

Stephanie Church

Acquisitions and Metadata Librarian, Case Western Reserve University


6:00pm

Assessing Relative Collection Strength Across Institutions: An Analysis of Memorial University of Newfoundland's Irish Studies Collection
Most, if not all, academic collections librarians are experiencing or have experienced the need to adjust their spending and collections activities to adhere to decreasing funds and resources as publisher prices increase, the value of the dollar fluctuates, and library budgets remain unchanged. If you are a collections librarian, however, and you have a vested interest in maintaining the strength of your valued collections despite the decreased funds available to ideally maintain them, you’re probably also searching for ways to make every dollar count. 

Knowing the strength of your collections, as well as the strength of the collections of other libraries, is a great way to determine the best way to spend collections budgets: strengthen our weaker areas, and maintain our strong areas. Given that tools designed for cross-institutional overlap projects can be expensive, I’ve been looking at ways to use some of the unique features of the tools we own to run effective analyses. I’ve also been looking to free, open source resources to use in this project. I started “small,” with an analysis of our holdings in Postcolonial Studies, and am now treading the deep waters of our very large, grant-winning, and nationally and internationally recognized Irish Studies collection. 

In June of 2015, I presented my Postcolonial findings at the annual conference of the Atlantic Provinces Library Association (APLA). By November, I will have completed my analysis of our Irish Studies collection, and I would like to present these findings at this year's Charleston Conference.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Tiller-Hackett

Amanda Tiller-Hackett

Humanities Collection Development Librarian, Queen Elizabeth II Library, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Amanda Tiller-Hackett is the Humanities Collection Development Librarian at Memorial University of Newfoundland’s Queen Elizabeth II Library. In this role, she manages collections in English Language and Literature, Linguistics, French, and the General Humanities which includes MUN Libraries’ nationally-recognized Irish Studies Collection. Amanda received her Master of Library & Information Science from the University of Western... Read More →


6:00pm

Back to the Future: Upgrading your VHS Collection for Increased Space & Accessiblity
While VHS media is still heavily present in academic library collections, the format has rapidly become obsolete over the last decade. With the inadequate supply of VCR’s and the physical deterioration of the VHS tapes, access to this content is becoming increasingly limited for library users.
In this poster session, the methodology and steps used to complete a 7000+ title VHS upgrade pilot project, as well as the valuable lessons learned, will be presented. It will detail the necessary steps, key players, timeline, and financial responsibilities the University of British Columbia – Okanagan Campus Library took to complete this project. In addition, the poster will look at the impact this type of project has on a library’s collection development, access, digital reformatting, copyright clearance, and distributor relationships. Examples will highlight how the decisions were made for withdrawal, repurchasing on DVD or out of region formats, reformatting through an outside company, or keeping the VHS. Discussion will include lessons learned and unexpected barriers and benefits, including the creation of new student study space. Overall, this poster will target how they each related to increasing access to collections for the different user groups of the library and how this type of project could be replicated in other libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Arielle Lomness

Arielle Lomness

Collections Librarian, University of British Columbia - Okanagan
Arielle is currently responsible for coordinating the UBC Library's Okanagan campus collections activities, including acquisitions, renewals, and cancellations. Along with the Library's Vancouver campus, she has been participating in leading e-book evidence-based and package acquisitions programs. Additional responsibilities include overseeing book and other material donations to the Library. | | Arielle’s research interests include... Read More →



6:00pm

Data-driven Approach for Supporting Day-to-Day and Strategic Decisions
Increasingly under pressure to demonstrate their value to their institution, libraries need creative ways to improve efficiency and productivity. Powerful analytic capabilities enable libraries to put numbers on their value and to expose tangible evidence of their leading role in the academic lifecycle. Valuable insight into libraries’ operations and user behavior can be gained via purchasing trends, comparative analysis, and even predictive analysis. We will explore ways in which analytical analysis from the library resource management solution, the discovery interface, and their combination, can take libraries into the next generation.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Branch

Denise Branch

Head, Continuing Resources, Virginia Commonwealth University
Denise is a native of Powhatan, Virginia and the Head of Continuing Resources at the VCU Libraries, earning her B.S. from VCU and M.L.I.S. from The Catholic University of America. Managing e-serials within the Ex Libris Alma and Primo system keeps her busy. She contributes her expertise for licensing, ordering, receiving and maintaining the Libraries’ extensive collection of e-serials. Overseeing the answering of user e-journal reports and... Read More →
avatar for Andrew French

Andrew French

Solutions Architect Manager, Ex Libris Group, Ltd.


6:00pm

Eliminating Barriers: 7 Best Practices For Creating a User Friendly Library Website
In a recent EBSCO survey to undergraduates, 40% of respondents stated that the library website was moderate to very challenging. 15% of respondents stated that they never use the library website.

An effective library website is critical to a user's research workflow and general understanding of the library's resources and sources. If the user finds the library website daunting then s/he may not a.) conduct an efficient and effective research, b.) have a full understanding of the value of the library, or c.) use it. This poster provides library staff especially those responsible for usability with recommended tips and tools for ensuring that students have a positive experience when using their library website. Common library website issues such as where to start, library jargon, navigation, content strategy, and accessibility will be addressed with the poster.

Speakers
KG

Khalilah Gambrell

User Researcher Consultant, EBSCO


6:00pm

How Weeding Adds Value to Library Collections: Weighing the Cost of Weeding and the Cost of Keeping Books
Weeding in libraries is often like the gardening chore it is named for: sweaty hours spent among dirty tangles to clear out messy undergrowth and remove unwanted materials. But the analogy stops there - the intellectual pursuit of a well-managed collection includes much more than identifying and removing materials from the shelf. In fact, the daunting, many-faceted weeding process can keep librarians from tackling this very crucial task. A collection left unassessed, left to grow ungainly, is also a missed opportunity to add value, and real cost savings, to the collection through weeding. Santa Clara University Library undertook a reference weeding project in 2013/14; library staff reviewed and relocated over 7,800 titles. Goals were to make the reference collection more relevant to current research needs and to redesign the library's first floor to create more high-demand user space. The project involved multiple library units with multiple workflows, with staff including librarians, paraprofessionals, and student workers. This poster presents detailed data on the cost of weeding a book in a mid-sized academic library, based on staff-time estimated during this project and national wage averages. These data, when compared to the “Cost of Keeping a Book” (by Courant and Nielsen, 2010), demonstrate the value associated with weeding and how, by acknowledging the cost associated with keeping a book, libraries can make evidenced-based decisions that may incentivize the weeding process and perhaps even lead to a more cost effective migration to building ebook collections.

Speakers
avatar for Tina E Chrzastowski

Tina E Chrzastowski

Head, Access & Delivery Services, Santa Clara University Library
avatar for Jessica Harris

Jessica Harris

Head of Electronic Resources and Serials, Santa Clara University Library



6:00pm

I Have All These E-Books...Now What?
While electronic journals have long been the staple in collection development, the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has recently opted for an electronic preferred model of collection development for all monographs even when print formats are available. This transition was made, in part, to serve students, faculty, researchers, and clinicians in the field who do not have immediate access to the physical library. This poster will display the results of a close examination of quantitative data gathered to determine the outcome of an electronic preference for monographs and the impact of this collection development policy on the CVM Library. The data examined will include usage statistics for specific user populations and cost analysis of the collection. While there are many factors in creating a collection development policy, librarians considering opting for an electronic preferred policy may consider the available evaluative data to determine if such a policy would suit their users and their collections. This poster will discuss the effects of the transition to an electronic preference in a niche monographic collection and what these effects may reveal for the future of collection development.

Speakers
DM

Derek Marshall

Coordinator of the College of Veterinary Medicine Library, Mississippi State University


6:00pm

Integrated Assessment for Informed Collection Management
In June 2015, the Kennesaw State University Library System launched a pilot implementation of a newly conceived Collection Assessment Plan. The plan follows a 5-year rotating schedule for systematically reviewing print holdings of the KSU Library System. It is broad in scope, spans multiple library departments, and integrates into operational workflows. Project contributors include Undergraduate Faculty Liaisons and Graduate Librarians as well as staff and student employees from Access Services, Technical Services, and Interlibrary Loan. In all, 36 employees distributed over four library locations will participate in this much-needed collection assessment and maintenance project.

This proposed model of collection assessment endorses the idea that assessment is best employed when fully integrated into collection workflows and procedures, and distributed among staff that make decisions about selection and withdrawal. Ultimately, the plan seeks to provide a structure for improved decision-making and strategic collection growth, while recognizing that no single metric is sufficient to serve all of these roles. Rather, it investigates multiple aspects of the collection, including use, patron perception, holdings analysis, areas of existing need, core title list comparisons, and peer benchmarks.

Speakers
AG

Ana Guimaraes

Collection Development Librarian, Kennesaw State University
ML

Michael Luther

Assessment Librarian, Kennesaw State University


6:00pm

Keep Those Book Trucks Rolling: Strategies for a Major Move of the Library Collection
The University Libraries at Virginia Tech recently completed an extensive move of the physical collection and reduction of the footprint of the stacks in our main facility. This session will relate key elements of what we learned during this multi-year process and share tips and strategies for an effective and efficient large-scale move. Attendees can see ways to address such issues as project management, communications, staffing, identifying materials for storage or deselection, and processing of materials. Visuals such as a workflow chart, project timeline, and before and after photographs will help graphically convey the process and how it may be applied elsewhere.

Speakers
avatar for Ladd Brown

Ladd Brown

Head of Acquisitions, Virginia Tech
A lot of things have changed in the thirty-odd years Ladd has been in the library biz. Not being able to smoke at your desk in Tech Services anymore is one of the biggies.


6:00pm

Looking Back and Moving Forward: A Multi-Year Circulation Statistical Story
In the past few years, Georgia Southern University (GSU) have been assessing its collection to guide any updates to collection development policies. In particular, the print monograph collection was pinpointed to confirm (or deny) the decreasing circulation trends in the library. Since the library switched to the Voyager system in early 2000, this date provided an opportunity as a starting point in examining print monograph circulation trends, thus, resulting in a fairly robust multi-year statistical data. In analyzing the data, three areas of inquiry were identified: 1. Overall circulation statistical trend; 2. Subject-specific trends; and 3. Publication year and its circulation trend. What does this data tells us? How does this affect collection development policies? In part of this analysis and coupled with budgetary concerns, collection development especially resource print monograph acquisition at GSU was updated to reflect changing circulation statistics. Starting this year, the library will move away from “just in case” to “just in time” to strategically align stakeholders’ needs and the library’s sustainability. Hence, the library looks into the future of collection development.

In this poster, attendees will be engage in the discussion of changing library acquisition models through a multi-year circulation statistical data.

Speakers
avatar for Paolo Gujilde

Paolo Gujilde

Coordinator of Collection Development, Georgia Southern University


6:00pm

Music on Demand
This poster will explore the process of developing a unique pilot PDA program for print music scores and monographs from concept to reality at an ARL institution, describing collection development considerations, IT infrastructure needs; implementation issues; request and acquisitions workflows; and plan evaluation. In 2014 collection management and acquisitions a at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida approached Harrassowitz, Booksellers and Subscription Agents regarding utilizing the vendors approval and new title announcement profiles to build a print PDA plan that would support the teaching, learning, and research needs of the musicology faculty. Though some academic libraries, including the Smathers Libraries, had implemented print PDA plans for monographs, no example of a plan for music scores could be identified. In addition, Harrassowitz did not support print PDA plans, but was willing to experiment with UF on a pilot basis. The poster intends to examine how partnering with vendors to implement innovative collection building plans, based on current trends in acquisition methods, can support both the needs of users and the goals of libraries through a method that offers an increase in access to materials in a fiscally responsible way. Session attendees can expect to learn about the opportunities and challenges the library and vendor faced in planning and implementing the plan, plan outcomes and evaluation, and what next steps will be taken. Attendees will be able to ask questions and engage in discussion with the librarians responsible for building and managing the plan.

Speakers
avatar for Alan  Asher

Alan Asher

Music Librarian, University of Florida
AL

Ann Lindell

Head, Architecture & Fine Arts Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

E-Resources Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
I am the E-Resources & Acqusitions Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. I have been with the Smathers Libraries since 2010, and in my current role since 2012. I received my MLS from the University of South Florida in 2009. My primary research focus is cost, use, and usage studies of e-resources, particularly pertaining to data driven decision making. I am also interested in acquisition/e-resource workflow... Read More →


6:00pm

Return on Instruction: Methods for Assessing the Impact of Information Literacy Instruction on the Use of Electronic Resources
Moving from simplistic, open web search strategies sufficient for high school level work to independently navigating the complex system of information sources available on college campuses is a developmental milestone for undergraduate students. One of the aims of library instruction is to play a critical role in this transition to college-level research, which necessitates the use of specialized databases and other information sources. Instruction librarians raise awareness of library e-resources and provide in-depth guidance in selecting and effectively using online sources. Santa Clara University librarians were interested in investigating the immediate impact of instruction on the use of the library’s e-resources. Do students regularly use library resources after instruction or do they revert to open web sources when searching independently?

To study this question, Santa Clara University librarians examined LibGuides statistics, usage data, and instruction data to determine how frequently students access library databases post-instruction. The investigators examined LibGuides associated with course instruction from a selection of classes and explored the potential impact of instructional techniques, timing of instruction, and assignment integration on sustained use of electronic resources. The investigators also examined use of resources by level of course to explore whether independent use of library resources increased as students progress through their college years.

This poster will share methodologies for assessing use of library e-resources after instruction using LibGuides statistics combined with usage and instruction data. The poster will also explore opportunities for implementing this method to assess instruction, access, and use of e-resources on college campuses.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Branch

Nicole Branch

Head of Instruction & Assessment, Santa Clara University Library
Nicole Branch is Head of Instruction & Assessment at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California. In this role, Nicole coordinates the library’s assessment program and serves as the subject librarian for the departments of anthropology, sociology, and the University’s Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship. Prior to joining the Santa Clara University Library in December 2014, Nicole served as Librarian for Research and Digitization... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth McKeigue

Elizabeth McKeigue

Associate University Librarian, Santa Clara University
Elizabeth McKeigue is the Associate University Librarian for Learning & Engagement at Santa Clara University in California. In this role, she oversees activities related to research, teaching, outreach, assessment, and access & delivery services. Prior to 2010, Ms. McKeigue held positions at Harvard University, including Head of Circulation for Widener Library and Coordinator of Reference Services for Widener & Lamont Libraries. Ms. McKeigue... Read More →



7:00pm

Annual Charleston Conference Reception
Charleston is well known for its hospitality, and the Annual Reception is a true Charleston affair! The reception this year will be held at the South Carolina Aquarium. Delicious lowcountry specialties as well as more familiar reception fare, will be served. More information to come!

Thursday November 5, 2015 7:00pm - 9:00pm
South Carolina Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Friday, November 6
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

8:30am

Opening Remarks
Speakers
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston


8:35am

Needle-Moving Collaboration: From Act to Impact
Drawing from the disciplines of sociology and economics, Skinner will explore both established and emergent models for system-wide transformation. Beginning with the premise that publishing today is an unstable environment, one where the key constants are change and uncertainty, Skinner will ask what we might accomplish if we shifted some of our attention from institutional concerns to system-level transformation. System-change models are being used to great effect in other arenas, and Skinner will illustrate a few of those and talk about ways that we might build bridges across all of the relevant players--publishers, libraries, content managers, and authors--in order to pursue a more stable field together.



 

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Skinner

Katherine Skinner

Executive Director, MetaArchive Cooperative, Educopia Institute
Katherine is the Executive Director of the Educopia Institute, a not-for-profit educational organization that builds networks and collaborative communities to help cultural, scientific, and scholarly institutions achieve greater impact. Skinner received her Ph.D. from Emory University. She has co-edited three books and has authored and co-authored numerous reports and articles on topics ranging from digital archiving and preservation to scholarly... Read More →


9:15am

The Long Arm of the Law
Abstract TBA

Moderators
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for William M. Hannay

William M. Hannay

Partner, Schiff, Hardin, LLP, Bill Hannay
William M. Hannay regularly represents corporations and individuals in civil and criminal matters, involving federal and state antitrust law and other trade regulation laws.  He is an Adjunct Professor, teaching courses at IIT/Chicago-Kent law school in antitrust, intellectual property, and international business transactions, and is the author or editor of several books on antitrust and intellectual property law, including "The Corporate... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Macklin

Lisa Macklin

Director, Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University
Lisa A. Macklin joined Emory in 2005 and was appointed the first Director, Scholarly Communications Office (formerly the Libraries Intellectual Property Rights Office) in 2007. In this role she works with faculty, students, and staff on the application of copyright law to teaching, research, and publishing (see Emory Scholarly Communications for more information). Her interests include transformations in scholarship and publishing... Read More →
avatar for Gary Price

Gary Price

Founder/Editor, Librarian, infoDOCKET
Gary Price is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area.  He is currently the Resource and Reference Center Director for GIJN and editor of infoDOCKET.com, a daily update of news and new research tools. | He lives near Washington, DC and grew up in the Chicago suburbs where he attended New Trier High School. Price received a Bachelors of Arts degree from the University of... Read More →


10:10am

10:30am

Don’t Get Married to the Results: Managing Library Change in the Age of Metrics
One of the greatest challenges facing directors at libraries of all levels is measuring success of new or existing programs or services. This is especially challenging to new directors who are conflicted between the culture of assessment and the need to demonstrate the value of the changes or programs at one’s library. The more entrepreneurial a director is, the more difficult it might be to measure the results. As a library director for nearly nine years, I have built a personal leadership toolkit based on a variety of resources. We have gone through a tremendous change in the nine years that I have been director at Kresge, including losing both collections and student space during the past year. Moving the library from a traditional entity into an ethereal one (as I like to call it) requires an approach that is entrepreneurial and unconventional. To that end, the direction that we have pursued in this (and other) changes implemented at our library has been crafted with an open mind to metrics and assessment. Rather than start a process with preconceived measure of success, instead it is something that we review and assess as we go. Us the phrase “don’t get married to the results,” I will share how I have used this to frame success in the library, especially in light of great change and upheaval.

Speakers
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan, Ross School of Business
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction project in 2016. Corey has been director since October 2006 and previously worked as the Associate Dean for Resource and Systems Management at the... Read More →


10:30am

GOBI, YBP & Overdrive - Changes in the Book Distribution Landscape
For background see http://www.against-the-grain.com/2015/03/atg-original-bt-ebsco-ybp-more-changes-to-distribution-channels/; http://www.against-the-grain.com/2015/06/newschannel-original-proquest-works-to-strengthen-services-to-academe-with-acquisition-of-sipx/ ; and http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/NewsBreaks/Rakuten-and-OverDrive-Building-a-Major-Global-Ebook-Platform-103040.asp

This past year has seen many strategic changes to book distribution to libraries. In this session ProQuest's CEO Kurt Sanford (which has just acquired SIPX) and OverDrive's President & CEO Steve Potash (which was acquired by Japanese corporate giant Rakuten) will discuss their strategic moves along with consultant Dan Tonkery who will provide analysis and commentary on what this means for the future of book distribution in libraries.

Moderators
NH

Nancy Herther

Social Sciences Librarian, University of Minnesota

Speakers
avatar for Steve Potash

Steve Potash

President, OverDrive
Steve Potash is President and CEO of OverDrive, Inc., a company that he founded in 1986. Under his leadership, OverDrive has become a leading global platform for eBooks, audiobooks and other digital media to a network of thousands of libraries, schools and retailers in more than 50 countries worldwide.  Steve has been active in the electronic publishing industry since the 1980s, and launched OverDrive’s flagship content... Read More →
KS

Kurt Sanford

President, ProQuest
avatar for Dan Tonkery

Dan Tonkery

CEO, Content Strategy


10:30am

The Young and the Restless: Fresh Eyes Scan the Library-Publishing Landscape
A panel of young professionals in academic libraries and scholarly publishing will be asked to share their views on the institutions they’ve recently joined, the current state of information services, library-vendor relations, and how they think their long futures in the scholarly information space might play out. This program is intending to provide a window into the hearts and minds of relative newcomers to the Charleston space; to hear where these young’uns might drive us if their bosses were to toss them the car keys.

Speakers
avatar for Mara Blake

Mara Blake

Spatial and Numeric Data Librarian, University of Michigan
As a spatial and numeric data library, I work on building our library collections of geospatial data and providing better discoverability and access to the collection. I also work with researchers using numeric, qualitative, and geospatial data technologies in their research and teaching.
avatar for Hannah Scates Kettler

Hannah Scates Kettler

Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries
Currently involved in public digital scholarship and pedagogy, social media, 3D digital representation and visualization, games and gaming, access and dissemination of higher education and research and big data archaeology.
avatar for Jen Maurer

Jen Maurer

Library Sales Representative, Midwest, Cambridge University Press
avatar for Mark Sandler

Mark Sandler

Director, CIC Center for Library Initiatives, Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC)
Mark Sandler is the Director of the Center for Library Initiatives at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). He is interested in how libraries, publishers and users are managing the transition from print to electronic resources, with particular focus on the collaborative efforts of libraries to extend their mission to include content creation. He was a founder of the Text Creation Partnership, and has worked closely with the Google... Read More →
avatar for Dan Valen

Dan Valen

Product Specialist, Figshare
Dan joined figshare in early 2014 as its first US-based employee. As a product specialist, he focuses on the development of figshare in North America through community engagement, marketing and promotion, strategic partnerships, and educational outreach. Dan helps provide a lateral perspective across the research data management landscape in assessing the needs of researchers and institutions alike, while also offering guidance on current... Read More →


11:35am

A Library-Publisher Partnership for Open Access: Building an Innovative Relationship between Scholarly Publishers and Libraries
As the importance of open access continues to grow, there remains no clear consensus on the ideal model to sustain scholarly publishing while making content openly accessible. Can a solution be found that meets the needs of both the scholarly publishers and university libraries? The Érudit Consortium and the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) are exploring one solution to this challenge through a strategic partnership, which aims to address two major challenges: the fragility of the Canadian scholarly publishing environment and the increasing pressure from libraries and funding agencies for scholarly journals to move towards open access. The session will present the perspectives of the two partner organizations, outlining the common goals, objectives, and strategy, as well as the differing needs and perspectives of libraries and publishers. It will summarize the steps taken to achieve this partnership, the success factors, the challenges faced, and the next steps.

• Attendees will learn more about how university libraries can play an active role in developing models to support open access to research
• Attendees will gain insight that may allow them to address other types of challenges in a collaborative fashion
• Attendees will gain an understanding of the challenges facing publishers and libraries in the Canadian publishing environment

Speakers
avatar for Joanie Lavoie

Joanie Lavoie

Director of Operations, Érudit Consortium
Joanie Lavoie is Director of Operations (Directrice des operations) of the Érudit Consortium, located in Montreal, Quebec. After completing her studies in literature and publishing, as well as a Masters in Arts and Culture management, she decided to apply her keen interest in the digital environment to the service of scholarly publishers. She joined Érudit in 2011 as the Journal Manager, responsible for increasing the visibility of Canadian... Read More →



11:35am

An Account and Analysis of the Implementation of Various E-Book Business Models at QUT, Australia
QUT (Queensland University of Technology) is a leading university based in the city of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia and is a selectively research intensive university with 2,500 higher degree research students and an overall student population of 45,000 students.

The transition from print to online resources is largely completed and the library now provides access to 450,000 print books, 1,000 print journals, 600,000 ebooks, 120,000 ejournals and 100,000 online videos. The ebook collection is now used three times as much as the print book collection.

This paper focuses on QUT Library’s ebook strategy and the challenges of building and managing a rapidly growing collection of ebooks using a range of publishers, platforms, and business and financial models. The paper provides an account of QUT Library’s experiences in using library book agent services in the provision of e-preferred approval plans for automated selection and shelf-ready services; the use of Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) using eBook Library (EBL); the strategic procurement of publisher and subject collections by lease and outright purchase models, and the more recent transition to Evidence Based Selection (EBS) options provided by some publishers. The paper provides an in-depth analysis of each of these business models at QUT, focusing on collection development, usage, cost per use, and value for money. The adoption of open access business models including Knowledge Unlatched is also explored.
Reference is also made to the adoption of commercial courseware provided by some traditionally book publishers, and how the Library can support the adoption of these services.

Speakers
MB

Martin Borchert

Associate Director, Library Services (Information Resources and Research Support), QUT (Queensland University of Technology)
JL

John Lenahan

Associate Vice President, Institutional Participation and Strategic Partnerships, Outreach and Participation, Ithaka


11:35am

Are We Doing Enough?: Four Stories of Diversity in Library Collections
Do your collections reflect the diversity of your constituents? Are you equipped to meet the diverse needs of future users? In light of budgetary and spatial challenges, diversity in collections may not be a priority for most libraries. Yet, changing demographics practically ensures that there will be an increase in the demand for diverse materials. See how librarians from 4 different types of academic institutions from 4 different regions have been dealing with (or not) with this issue.

Alburo will talk about how area studies collections brings a global perspective to a Tier 1 university in the West Coast while Beh will present the challenges of building a diverse collection at a Tier 1 STEM institution in the East Coast. Gong will discuss how a Midwestern community college with a non-diverse library collection is scrambling to acquire recent materials as it is faced by new needs from underrepresented groups, and Gujilde will talk about how he is looking for opportunities to change the lack of diversity in the collection at his comprehensive state university in the South.

Attendees will leave with a better understanding of the collection development issues related to diversity. We will leave enough time for the audience to share their own experiences, challenges, and successes so that we can all come away with an even wider range of possible ideas to implement in our own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Jade Alburo

Jade Alburo

Librarian for Southeast Asian and Pacific Islands Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
Jade Alburo is the Librarian for Southeast Asian and Pacific Islands Studies at UCLA. She is currently chairing the National Diversity in Libraries Conference. She is a past President (2012-2013) of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) and was co-chair of its 35th Anniversary Symposium (2015).
avatar for Eugenia Beh

Eugenia Beh

Electronic Resources Librarian, MIT
Eugenia Beh is the Electronic Resources Librarian at the MIT Libraries. She currently serves as a Member-At-Large on the NASIG Executive Board and is the ALCTS representative to the ALA Legislation Assembly.
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

Open Educational Resources (OER) Project Manager, Lansing Community College
I'm a librarian and I wear many hats here at LCC. I'm the OER Project Manager as well as Head of Technical Services and Systems. While I always enjoy my work as librarian, open education broadened my horizons. It really dovetails quite nicely with the core values of librarianship to provide everyone with free and equal access to information. I would love to talk to you about your OER projects and how it has impacted students, faculty... Read More →
avatar for Paolo Gujilde

Paolo Gujilde

Coordinator of Collection Development, Georgia Southern University



11:35am

Balancing Bananas: Collection Assessment of Patron-Driven Acquisitions
The University of Colorado Boulder participated in one of the first patron-driven acquisition (PDA) pilots in the late 1990s. During the pilot, CU-Boulder triggered a substantial number of books about bananas as the result of an undergraduate research assignment. The pilot was largely considered a failure because of the rapid rate at which funds were expended and because it resulted in the selection of materials that were deemed inappropriate for the collection. However, it also demonstrated user demand for e-books and illustrated the librarians’ role in the selection of materials in academic libraries.

In 2010, CU Boulder revisited patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) and launched a consortia pilot for the CU system. Unlike the initial pilot, the current PDA model utilizes custom, subject-based profiles to identify content within the scope of our collection development policies. While this mediated version of PDA has increased our libraries’ comfort level, it is unclear if PDA is working for all subjects or different types of libraries.

This presentation will explore how PDA has impacted collection building at each library in the CU System. Which subjects are loading the most records and triggering the most purchases; which library is triggering those purchases; and how does a library analyze the impact of a PDA e-book program on the print book collection? Are we building collections that support the teaching and research needs of our campuses given existing resources? If we aren’t purchasing banana books, what do we have instead?

Speakers
avatar for Rhonda Glazier

Rhonda Glazier

Director of Collections Management, University of Colorado Colorado Springs
Ms. Glazier is the Director of Collections Management at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs and has worked in libraries for over twenty-five years. She has worked in both public and academic libraries with the majority of her work focusing on the traditional areas of technical services: acquisitions, collection development, cataloging and serials. Areas of interest include the changing landscape of collections in academic libraries, the... Read More →
avatar for Gabrielle Wiersma

Gabrielle Wiersma

Head of Collection Development, University of Colorado Boulder



11:35am

Collecting Ideas on Collecting: How to Edit a Collected Work from Concept to Publication
Collection development librarians face many challenges in the rapidly changing environment of scholarly publications. One approach is to investigate other librarians’ experiences —and then compile the solutions in a special journal issue or book of collected essays. The authors have experience compiling collected works and are eager share tips and techniques to encourage others to accept the rewarding challenge of compiling an edited work in collection development. Steps include:
• Developing an idea
• Deciding whether to edit solo or with a team
• Finding a publisher
• Writing the proposal
• Setting goals and deadlines
• Working with a style guide
• Soliciting contributions and/or sending out a call for papers
• Selecting papers
• Communicating with authors
• Editing papers
• Communicating with the publisher

Speakers
avatar for Judith M. Nixon

Judith M. Nixon

Education Librarian, Purdue University
Over the course of my library career, I have been building academic library collections in the area of education, business, food/nutrition, and hospitality. This has ranged from selecting and evaluating databases to journal deselection projects, from designing libraries to solving miss-shelving problems. Technology has made our job of developing collections easier because of the wealth of data about our collection use and our users.
avatar for Suzanne Ward

Suzanne Ward

Collection Strategist, Purdue University
My interests include e-books, patron-driven acquisitions, print retention, and professional writing.


11:35am

Collections as a Service
We are living through a cultural transition from print to digital with stakeholders in scholarly communication required to navigate a dynamic, hybrid environment. The session will outline the philosophical approach used by a large ARL to conceive of ‘collections as a service’ as a guiding principle in shaping collection development decisions both internally and within broader collaborative networks. Data on usage of both print and online collections are regularly analyzed and inform these decisions, with the data sometimes running counter to anecdotal or self-reported preferences by users for print over digital formats.

The session has two objectives: to give the audience a better understanding of how a large academic research library is responding to the changing conditions in scholarly communications and user preferences, and to show practical ways that data is being used to guide that process. The session will include (if possible) a live demonstration of library use data using a visualization application (Tableau). There will be time provided for Q&A so the audience can respond to the session and ask further questions.

This session is proposed as a single presentation, but it could be structured as a panel session by seeking to include a speaker from another academic research library and/or a publisher.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Dollar

Daniel Dollar

Director of Collection Development, Yale University Library
Daniel Dollar is the Director of Collection Development for the Yale University Library. As the library’s chief collection development officer, Daniel leads and coordinates collection activities in all formats, and manages the collection development budget. In addition, he represents the Yale University Library as a participating partner with the Research4Life initiative.


11:35am

Combined Title TBA: Merging 'E-Book Tune-up' and 'For the love of e-books: How skeptical academic librarians came to embrace books made of bits'
Combined abstract TBA

Speakers
avatar for Nathan Carlson

Nathan Carlson

Eresources & Discovery Librarian, Metropolitan State University
avatar for Janet Nazar

Janet Nazar

Coordinator of Content Management/Collection Services, Furman University Library
I serve as the Coordinator of Content Management in Collection Services at the J.B. Duke Library, Furman University in Greenville, SC. I have worked at the Furman library for 14 years and have experience in cataloging, electronic resources management and acquisitions. On a personal note, I enjoy "B" movies, cooking and speak conversational Farsi.
avatar for Caroline C Mills PhD

Caroline C Mills PhD

Assistant Director for Collection Services, Furman University
Caroline Mills has over 20 years of academic library experience serving most recently as Assistant Director for Collection Services at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. Caroline has a Masters in Information and Library Science from the University of South Carolina and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership, with a focus on assessment in higher education, from Clemson University. Her current area of research interest include consortial... Read More →


11:35am

Developing Collaborative Connections - Faculty, Researchers, and Librarians
The health of an institution’s research program depends on how well the entire campus ecosystem manages the research process and scholarly output. Increased competition for funds and greater demand by funders for impact reporting makes it critical for research institutions to consolidate disparate internal data sources like repositories, finance data and faculty profiles. Research management systems make connecting faculty activity to other campus systems easy and simplify the reporting and showcasing processes. Within the university, the library is uniquely positioned to lead implementation of a campus-wide research management system because of the library’s neutral position and expertise in maintaining bibliographic information, disambiguating people and concepts and using metadata to discover relationships.

This panel will explore how different libraries have implemented a research management system on their campuses. Panelists will discuss how to capture research output beyond journal articles, how to get humanities researchers to buy into the system and how to effectively partner across the campus to support both faculty and administration.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Fransen

Jan Fransen

Service Lead for Researcher and Discovery Systems, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
Talk to me about discovery systems (especially Primo/Primo Central), researcher information systems (like Experts@Minnesota!), and the role libraries might play in students' success.
avatar for Beth Namachchivaya

Beth Namachchivaya

Associate University Librarian for Research, University of Illinois
KO

Kelechi Okere

Global Director of Pure, Elsevier
GT

Gretchen Trkay

Department Head of Outreach and Scholarship, UT Arlington
avatar for Ashley Zmau

Ashley Zmau

E-resources Librarian, University of Texas at Arlington
Ashley Zmau is the Assistant Librarian for E-resources at the University of Texas at Arlington where she provides leadership for managing the e-resource lifecycle and license negotiation while working collaboratively to support liaison librarians for outreach and scholarship. In this role, she oversees the Serials Team comprised of four Library Specialists, and is responsible for maintaining the Library’s ERM, as well as the management of all... Read More →


11:35am

How Much do Monographs Cost? And Why Should We Care?
What does it cost to make a high quality, digital monograph? What may sound like an obvious question turns out to be a very knotty one, driving to the heart of the essence of scholarly publishing today. It is particularly relevant in an environment where the potential of a sustainable Open Access business model for monographs is being explored. Two complementary studies funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in 2015, have explored this question to understand the costs involved in creating and disseminating scholarly books.

The team at Ithaka S+R studied the full costs of publishing monographs by gathering cost data on a sample of nearly 400 titles across 20 presses. This process involved working both with directors, CFOS and many operational staff to understand the way staff time and effort contribute to the publishing process.

At Michigan and Indiana, a top-down model was used to identify those costs related to monograph publishing at the University of Michigan Press and Indiana University Press. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with faculty and administrators to explore institutional openness to a flipped business model where the costs of producing a monograph would be borne by the author’s parent institution.

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Kahn

Meredith Kahn

Women’s Studies and Open Access Librarian, University of Michigan Library
avatar for Nancy Maron

Nancy Maron

President, BlueSky to BluePrint, LLC
Independent consultant, researcher and strategist, helping publishers and leaders of digital initiatives develop strong business plans and sound funding models.
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


11:35am

Improving the Availability of ISSN – A Joint Project
This session will describe the 2015 pilot project and ongoing cooperation between the International ISSN Centre based in Paris and ProQuest to identify active titles without ISSN. The project is using Ulrich’s Periodicals Database as the initial resource. Under the supervision of the International Centre, national ISSN Centers determine whether the ISSN is simply missing, or has never been assigned. The outcome of the project will be a benefit to librarians, publishers, and vendors as more titles will have ISSN registered with the national and International ISSN Centres and in Ulrich’s Periodical Database. This will improve the electronic loading and matching of titles. Gaëlle Béquet, director of the International ISSN Centre, and Laurie Kaplan of ProQuest will discuss how the project came to be, the pilot work and refinements to the process, and the ongoing work and schedule for going forward. The audience will be encouraged to ask questions and help determine the best way to encourage all interested parties to use the ISSN as identifier whenever possible.

Speakers
avatar for Gaëlle Béquet

Gaëlle Béquet

Director, ISSN International Centre
Gaëlle Béquet was appointed director of the ISSN International Centre in March 2014. She began her career as an ICT specialist at the French Ministry of culture and communication. She has also worked in various academic libraries. She holds a PhD in Information Science (2011) from Sorbonne University. In 2014, she published her book Trois bibliothèques européennes face à Google: aux origines de la... Read More →
avatar for Laurie Kaplan

Laurie Kaplan

Sr. Project Manager, ProQuest
Laurie Kaplan, as Director of Editorial Operations at ProQuest, facilitates efforts of the international database and the Serials Provider Relations teams. Throughout her career of over a decade at ProQuest, Laurie has successfully directed the international data team responsible for Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, Ulrich’s Web, and the multinational databases in 360 Core. Prior to joining ProQuest, Laurie worked in legal directory... Read More →



11:35am

Managing a Shared Print Repository: From Policy to Program
At the time of this conference, Georgia Tech and Emory University will likely have received the Certificate of Occupancy for the Library Service Center, a 4M volume capacity, climate controlled facility that houses and circulates a shared collection. We will provide an update on our activities from our presentation last year. Specifically, we will discuss numerous policies and procedures that we co-developed regarding:

1. collections: ingest procedures, bibliographic/database maintenance, de-duplicating materials, preservation, and circulation
2. discovery: the integration of the inventory control system with Alma
3. document delivery: daily deliveries to the two campuses, document delivery, and ILL
4. finance and administration: staffing, financing, and the management of the facility

A panel of managers from both Georgia Tech and Emory will talk about how these policies were developed within the framework of formal project management. These managers will also talk about how building a shared retrospective print collection served as an effective catalyst for prospective collection development between two very different, but complementary collections, libraries, and universities.

Outcome:

Through panel presentations and discussion participants will learn how managers at Tech and Emory have further developed our plans for a shared physical collection in a common repository and how we are thinking a about services for our respective users. Participants will learn how formal project management tools were leveraged to build trust in order to develop and codify decisions.

Speakers
JC

Jeff Carrico

Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Access, Georgia Tech
LM

Lars Meyer

Director, Content Division, Emory University
CS

Charles Spornick

Director, Services Division, Emory University
I am currently the interim head of the Services Division for the Woodruff Library- Emory's main library.   From 2004 through 2012 I was the head of collection management at Emory; from 1995 through 2004 I was the head of library’s Beck Center.   There he worked with worked with faculty, other libraries, and the campus Information Technology Division ins planning and implementing digitization projects.   My... Read More →
avatar for Susan Stearns

Susan Stearns

Executive Director, Boston Library Consortium and Project Director, EAST, Boston Library Consortium
Susan Stearns was appointed Executive Director of the Boston Library Consortium [BLC] in August, 2013. She began her career as a corporate and academic librarian, working at Abt Associates in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia among others. Following her early years in libraries, Ms. Stearns worked for a number of vendors serving academic, special and public libraries including CLSI, Faxon... Read More →


11:35am

Measuring Open Access- Current State of the Art
The Open Access (OA) model for scientific publications has been examined for years by academics who have argued that it presents advantages in increasing accessibility and, consequently, in increasing the impact of papers.

It has been noted that OA availability has increased steadily over the years. However, current measurement has seriously underestimated the proportion of OA peer-reviewed articles. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new measurement methods. One challenge is to distinguish more clearly between Gold OA, Hybrid OA and non-fully Gold journals, and self-archiving (‘Green OA’).

This presentation examines the results of recent studies assessing the free availability of scholarly publications during different time periods and the proportion of Open Access Papers published in peer-reviewed journals at different levels. Different types of growth in freely available papers have been identified and analyzed.

In conclusion, best practices for institutional repository management will be mentioned and opportunities and challenges faced by the OA model will be examined. The audience is welcome to ask their question and share their feedback during the presentation.


Friday November 6, 2015 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Open Access: Integration or Segregation: Is there a role for database vendors?
Open Access is increasingly an essential component of academic scholarship and research. But where does Open Access content fit with the library’s academic databases – should Open Access play a role in the content set of vendors’ databases? Should OA be separate from these databases or integrated?
Join a lively panel discussion with two published experts in the field (academic librarians/faculty members) and two representatives from the vendor perspective (ProQuest staff). The panel session will utilize a state-of-the-art audience response system for engaging, real-time interaction with session attendees on questions such as: “What, if any, is the role of third party aggregators in providing access to OA?” “How much is too much OA in aggregated (paid) databases?” “What are discovery and usage pain points with OA – can vendors help with metadata for discovery, vetting quality titles, easier access to OA content in hybrid models?” We’ll lay out some issues, take in responses, and see real-time feedback from every participant. Open Access: Integration or Segregation? – Let’s find out!

Speakers
avatar for Kim Armstrong

Kim Armstrong

Deputy Director, CIC
Kimberly is currently Deputy Director, Center for Library Initiatives, at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. The CIC, founded in 1958, is an academic consortium of the fourteen Big Ten universities and the University of Chicago. Her current responsibilities include management for the Google book scanning project, the CIC Shared Print Repository and support for working groups on resource sharing, content licensing, and scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Brechner

Sarah Brechner

Senior Product Manager, ProQuest
I'm a librarian with a background in social sciences and literature. I've worked at ProQuest since 1996. Prior to that, I worked in a variety of libraries, which was very interesting and challenging, but eventually, I wanted to help create the information resources we used at the library . I've really enjoyed my work at ProQuest, seeing it as a natural extension of the service work I did in libraries. Getting the right information to users is... Read More →
avatar for Carmelita Pickett

Carmelita Pickett

Associate University Librarian, University of Iowa
Carmelita Pickett is the Associate University Librarian for Collections & Scholarly Communications at the University of Iowa Librries. She is responsible for providing leadership and oversight for the development and management of the University Libraries’ collections. She has over 15 years of experience in academic libraries. Prior to her appointment at the University of Iowa Libraries, she served as the Director of Collection Development... Read More →
MR

Missy Roser

Head of Research and Instruction, Amherst College


11:35am

Outsourced and Overwhelmed: Gaining a Grasp on Managing Electronic Resources
Outsourcing the management of electronic journals has significantly reduced the autonomy academic libraries have over their collection’s metadata, as well as the ways in which that data is summarized and made available to the library, yet the ephemerality of serials data makes quality-control burdensome and costly on the corporate end and necessitates ongoing title-tracking and database maintenance on the library’s end. As a result, the quality of data in outsourced knowledgebases is often inversely proportional to the library’s tolerance of “bad data,” as well as our inability to tell the difference. This session demonstrates how an MS Access database was constructed that integrates data from various sources in order to reconcile title lists from varied sources, process yearly subscription changes, and manage the distribution of work to departmental staff. As such, it both serves as a reconciliation tool with administrative functions for linking and displaying summary data about subscribed e-journal packages, and it provides a workflow tool with a user interface designed for staff to easily manage ongoing subscription maintenance. Serials are dynamic by nature, and a management system should have the ability to track and respond to these changes. This easily-maintained tool offers a model for managing change across the interrelated applications that manage subscriptions to online serials.

Speakers
MH

Matthew Harrington

Data Projects and Partnerships, NC State University
Matthew Harrington currently works on database projects and financial reconciliation in the Acquisitions and Discovery Department at NC State University's James B. Hunt Jr. Library.  Since returning to libraries from an academic career in 2009, he has designed, constructed and presented several reconciliation and ROI databases for academic libraries.  He is also currently earning a MLIS at Valdosta State University with an emphasis on... Read More →


11:35am

Playing 'Moneyball' in Librarianship: The Winning Strategy of Gap Analysis
Anyone familiar with the book or movie, “Moneyball,” also knows the term, “sabermetrics.” When the Oakland A’s started to assemble its Major League Baseball team for the 2002 season, it was facing limited revenues and the departure of three marquee players. Billy Beane, the team’s general manager, and his staff adopted an analytical, evidence-based approach to assembling a competitive team. They filled the gaps in their line-up based on careful research, not just gut feelings. Many librarians find themselves in a situation not unlike the one Beane faced in early 2002. But if librarians think in a new way – move toward data-driven acquisition like Billy Beane – they just might be able to provide greater access to the foundational and interdisciplinary content library patrons want, and elevate their own stature within an institution. The objective of this session is to show librarians how they can use various types of data to make strategic acquisition decisions. To make the session interactive, we would show sample data and give participants the opportunity to discuss acquisition options based on the data and budgets, and how information like this would be useful in their own institutions. Participants will learn how data can drive high-quality decisions and be a powerful vehicle for change. The format would be a moderated panel of librarians.

Speakers
avatar for Becky Pease

Becky Pease

Sr Channel Marketing Manager, ScienceDirect Books, Elsevier


11:35am

Shotgun Session
1. Space Planning: Calculating Collection Footprints
Shawn Tonner

Downsizing or moving collections off-site, particularly portions of the print journal collections, is a frequent topic of discussion in academic libraries. How do you determine the space required or gained when journals or other collections are relocated or de-accessioned?   The purpose of this session is to present a process for measuring and calculating the linear and square foot dimensions of your collection.  The presenter will discuss planning steps, labor requirements, and how to get to the bottom line for your next measurement project. It is not rocket science, just a practical approach to a common problem. 

2. Giving Subject Specialists the Tools They Need To Succeed: The Collection Development Training Manual at the University of Maryland 
Maggie Saponaro

The University of Maryland Libraries (UMD) has over 40 librarians with collection development responsibilities. These subject specialists represent a range of varying experience levels with collection development – from new librarians to seasoned veterans. Although many subject specialists are required to use the same tools for their collection development activities, materials to support these activities were not always easy to find, nor was there one place to direct new subject specialists who needed resources to assist them with their responsibilities. Attendees will learn the process undertaken to develop of a toolkit for materials for subject specialists, including the key issues identified by subject specialists and members of the Library Acquisitions unit, the framework developed for the toolkit, and the implementation process for the toolkit.  

3. Picture This:  Using Instagram to Promote Your Library
Laura Crain 

As a way to reach students where they are, Saint Michael’s College Library entered the social media world by launching an Instagram account in February 2014.  Instagram is a popular social media app used for sharing photos and videos.  Instagram allows students to connect with the library in a fun, informal and visual way.  Pew Research reports that 53% of college-aged adults use Instagram.  We estimate that half of Saint Michael’s College students, about 1000 students, are Instagram users.  This presentation will cover the art of captioning, popular and unpopular posts, hashtags, social media themes, promoting scholarship, reposting, and analytics.

4. EPUB 3: What you need to know
Joshua Tallent 

The EPUB format is constantly changing and adapting, and it can be hard to keep up with those changes. This shotgun session will give you all the information you need to know about the EPUB format, including what it can do, differences between EPUB 2 and EPUB 3, what features are actually supported in reading systems, and new or upcoming features like EDUPUB.   

Speakers
avatar for Laura Crain

Laura Crain

Associate Director, Saint Michael's College
avatar for Maggie Saponaro

Maggie Saponaro

Head of Collection Development, University of Maryland, College Park
Directs the collection development work of the University of Maryland Libraries’ subject specialist liaison librarians, with primary responsibility for content and budgeting of the UMD Libraries' general collections. Serves on the Collection Strategies and Services (CSS) administrative team in policy creation and strategic planning across the entire division.
avatar for Joshua Tallent

Joshua Tallent

Director of Outreach and Education, Firebrand Technologies
Joshua Tallent, the Director of Outreach and Education at Firebrand Technologies, is dedicated to helping publishers around the world create better books. In addition to heading up training and outreach efforts within Firebrand, Joshua serves on multiple industry committees and working groups and teaches at publishing conferences year-round. He also leads the development of FlightDeck, the most robust EPUB quality assurance tool... Read More →
avatar for Shawn Tonner

Shawn Tonner

Interim Associate Dean, Florida International University
Shawn Tonner is currently involved in a large observational study of student use of the university library facilities, program planning for the exhibition of Shakespeare’s First Folio at FIU’s Frost Art Museum in February 2016, and a variety of statistical studies.   | | In addition to her 30+ year career as an academic librarian, Shawn has been a library building consultant for 19 years.



11:35am

Stop Looking Over My Shoulders - A Consensus Framework for Patron Privacy
As content moves into digital systems and increasingly onto the cloud, we need to recognize that those systems are constantly tracking reader behavior and interactions with that content. That does not mean, however, that we should be checking patron's privacy at the door. In 2015, NISO launched an initiative to develop a consensus framework for patron privacy in libraries, publishers and information systems. Building on decades of advocacy in the library community, the NISO project aims to take a practical approach to how publishers, libraries and vendors can balance the expectations of privacy and the value that can be derived from applying usage information to improving services. A series of discussions culminated in an in-person meeting in San Francisco during which a draft framework was agreed. This talk will outline that resulting framework and encourage its adoption within the community.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Director for Programs, National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Director for Programs at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior to joining NISO in 2011, Nettie worked at Ex Libris, where she served for 11 years in a number of library and information provider-facing roles, working on link... Read More →


11:35am

The Once and Future Publishing Library
The recently published The Once and Future Publishing Library (Okerson & Holzman 2015)* tracks the development of library publishing from the 1990s to the present. With the formation and continuing growth of the Library Publishing Coalition, now open to international as well as North American membership, plus the unification--at minimum through reporting lines--of about twenty percent of American university presses with their institution’s library, it seems a good time to evaluate where we are and, perhaps more importantly, where library publishing might be going. Using the report as a starting point, panelists will consider such questions as the large and small goals of library publishing initiatives, the types of materials libraries are best at and perhaps not as good at publishing, creating sustainable business models, peer review, disseminating and marketing library materials, and curation. Panelists will include librarians active in publishing activities, university and/or commercial publishers, and disseminators of scholarly content (eg., Project Muse, JStor, EBSCO). Perhaps a practicing scholar as well to comment on what a scholar would expect a library publisher to provide among its services. The tentative format would be for the session chair to pose questions for each of the panelists to address.

*--to be published by CLIR summer 2015

Moderators
avatar for Alex Holzman

Alex Holzman

Scholarly Communications Consultant, Alex Publishing Solutions
Alex Holzman retired as Temple University Press director in 2014 and now heads Alex Publishing Solutions, a scholarly communications consultant.  He has, during a forty-year career, been involved in scholarship as press director, editor, electronic publishing coordinator, author, speaker, and salesperson at Temple, Cambridge University Press, Ohio State University Press, and Charles Scribners Sons. Alex served as president of the Association... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Lecturer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment, Bonn served as the associate university librarian for publishing at the University of Michigan Library, with responsibility for publishing and scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Amy Brand

Amy Brand

Director, MIT Press
Amy Brand was named Director of the MIT Press in July 2015. Previously, she served as VP Academic and Research Relations and VP North America at Digital Science. From 2008 to 2013, Brand worked at Harvard University, first as Program Manager of the Office for Scholarly Communication and then as Assistant Provost for Faculty Appointments and Information. Before moving to Harvard, she held long-term positions as an Executive Editor at the MIT Press... Read More →
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

What Goes Around, Comes Around: Calibrating the Academic Research Life Cyle to the Open Access Life Cycle
This presentation will outline the key components of the academic research life cycle and how libraries can align their services to best serve academic authors. By walking through each component of the academic research life cycle, we will outline the services libraries currently have available or can develop to best coordinate with the activities undertaken by the research community. This talk will also explore the development work occurring above the campus level to indicate the most useful standards and services available beyond the campus environment. In addition, the presenters will also explore the need to develop further life cycles for researcher management offices and publishers as well. Attendees at this session will gain an in-depth understanding of the current components of both the US & UK research life cycle, what services libraries can be offering, as well as the services available beyond the campus. In addition, the life cycle will depict where current public policies and funder mandates are applicable within the research process.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University
avatar for Graham Stone

Graham Stone

Information Resources Manager, University of Huddersfield
Graham is Information Resources Manager at the University of Huddersfield UK where he manages the library’s information resources budget, including acquisitions, subscriptions and APC payments. He also manages the University Repository and University Press. Graham has been involved with a number of Jisc projects including Huddersfield Open Access Publishing and the OA best practice pathfinder project. He is co-author of OAWAL (Open Access... Read More →


12:30pm

When You Come to a Fork in the Road, Take It (15th Annual Health Sciences Lively Lunch)
Limited Capacity seats available

Sponsored Luncheon - RSVP Required

In this year's sponsored, but no holds barred lunch, participants will have the opportunity to contemplate examples of proactive approaches answering the question posed by the 2015 conference theme, “Where Do We Go From Here?”.  After greetings from the lunch host, Rittenhouse, and the traditional brief “year in review” recap by Ramune Kubilius, three panelists will share insights and open the floor for lively discussion with session participants.

Researchers increasingly must meet various data management requirements and mandates, while educators are challenged by changing trends in providing curricular content. Where does that leave libraries? In the best case scenarios, they utilize approaches espoused in Yogi Berra’s advice—they follow paths (opportunities) that present themselves, and become partners.

Cunera Buys will describe work she and Pamela Shaw (Biosciences & Bioinformatics Librarian, Northwestern University’s Galter Health Sciences Library) have done in the data management planning arena, as part of a university working group. She will touch on differing disciplinary needs and how data management affects scholarly publishing and communication activities.

Are alternate open textbooks a solution for educators seeking health sciences curricular reading materials? Elizabeth Lorbeer will discuss the current environment, experiments, and roles (“reinvented” expertise) librarians can share in order to help faculty and students. 

Finally, before moving to longer lively discussion, moderator Jean Gudenas will round out the panel by sharing examples of recent developments and experiments, how libraries have strived to demonstrate value in the collections and document delivery arena.

Moderators
avatar for Jean Gudenas

Jean Gudenas

Head of Collections Management, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Library
For the past five years, Jean Gudenas has been the Head of Collections Management for Loyola University Health Sciences Library in Maywood, Illinois. In that time, she has facilitated the transition of a largely print-based collection to a nearly all-electronic collection. Her current focus is determining what a collection is, specifically with the philosophy behind access versus ownership . She received her BA in Philosophy and English from... Read More →

Speakers
CM

Cunera M. Buys

E-Science Librarian, Northwestern University Library
Cunera is the E-science librarian at Northwestern University Libraries. As the E-science Librarian, she keeps abreast on issues involving Federal Funder requirements for data sharing and data management issues. She also conducts data management workshops for faculty, graduate students and staff. In addition to her data management responsibilities, she is a subject liaison for Mathematics, Statistics, Earth & Planetary Sciences, and... Read More →
RK

Ramune K. Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University, Galter Health Sciences Library
Longtime health sciences librarian, member of MLA (Medical Library Association), SLA (Special Libraries Association), also regional and state health sciences library organizations. Involved with Charleston Conference as a program director, conference dine-around host, and recruiter/compiler of conference session “And They Were There” reports for “Against the Grain” (ATG). Active in organizing conference's health sciences Lively Lunches... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Lorbeer

Elizabeth Lorbeer

Library Director, Western Michigan University SOM
Liz is the library director at Western Michigan University School of Medicine, a new medical school in the U.S. to be granted preliminary accreditation from the Liaison Committee of Medical Education. I am interested in all things library and learning new ways to disseminate content using the latest technologies. I like hearing about new products from the vendors and cool things librarians are doing at their shop.




Friday November 6, 2015 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Vincent Chicco's 39-G John Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Accelerating Adoption of Green Open Access
Adoption by scholars of their rights to put a version of their articles into repository so that anyone can access it is very low. Even in places where there are mandates or policies requiring or strongly encouraging Open Access the policies and mandates are only forward looking, so many important articles are not archived. In places or disciplines where there are no mandates form funding organizations or where there are no institutional policies strongly encouraging open access the adoption rates are extremely low. What can be done to have the vast majority of scholarly articles freely available to learners and scholars world-wide?
A proposal has been made that publishers, especially open access publishers, could ping authors of referenced sources to encourage them self-archive a version of their articles.
This lively lunch will be to discuss the pro's and con's of this approach and identify what are some of the tools in place or under development which could automate the processes of any organization seeking to urge scholars to self-archive.

Speakers
avatar for John Dove

John Dove

Consultant, Paloma & Associates
I’m the former CEO of Credo Reference, and before that President of Silverplatter. I am now a consultant to the publishing and library worlds. I am a member of the NISO Discovery to Deliver Topic Committee, a partner at Mind Bridge, and an advisor to a small number of technology and e-content providers. I co-edited (with Dave Tychoson) Reimagining Reference in the 21st Century which is part of the Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and... Read More →
SH

Sebastian Hammer

President, Index Data


12:45pm

Creating the Sandbox: The Juxtaposition of Collections and Student Development
Universities and their libraries play an important social acculturation role by helping to educate and support the intellectual, emotional and even moral growth of young adults as they prepare to enter the working world and to define themselves as individuals and contributing members of society. This presentation will explore the role(s) that academic library collections play in relation to the psychosocial development of young adults. Drawing upon contemporary learning and young adult development theory, we will situate the role of academic library collections in relation to the various developmental stages, tasks and learning challenges that young adults experience during a typical university experience. While academic library collections are typically built and assessed in response to curricular needs and accreditation processes, they can also be intentionally developed and promoted with more conscious attention to the developmental needs and context of the students who will use them. Audience input will be sought to explore how traditional ways of selecting, promoting, and providing access to library collections can be modified to create more direct and meaningful engagement for our students as they seek to define themselves and make the transition to adulthood.
Learning outcomes will include:
• Understanding of university-aged student psychosocial development stages
• Understanding of the role of library collections in relation to student development needs
• How collections practices can be designed to maximize support for student development needs

Speakers
LG

Linda Graburn

Information Resources Librarian, University of Guelph
avatar for Helen  Salmon

Helen Salmon

Information Resources Librarian, University of Guelph Library
- reading | - gardening


12:45pm

Elsevier's Heirs, or, Yes, Copyright IS Confusing
Even when we understand the stakes, many of us still find publication agreements and copyright in general to be a mystery. While Elsevier’s new article-sharing policy represents the latest high-profile attempt to change the ecosystem for scholarly sharing, agreements from many publishers impact open access and library practice. Is Creative Commons the simple answer it seems to be? Or do the CC licenses add their own layers of complexity ? This session will introduce the most commonly-encountered stumbling blocks and latest trends, as well as offering a hands-on look at real contracts that need some fixing up.

Join us for a conversation about publishing, copyright, and open access grounded . How are your colleagues reacting to changes in practice? What can librarians do to educate scholars - including librarians publishing our own work and supporting library publishing - about these issues? Who has the time to keep up with all this stuff?

Led by an attorney at a large STEM-based institution. a scholarly communication librarian at a smaller private university, and an open access researcher / activist at an ARL institution, discussion will both challenge the audience and follow audience interest to address questions and share experiences. Whether you’re publishing your own work, supporting someone who is, or just want to know what all those weird Latin phrases mean, this lunch promises to be a great chance to learn more about the environment so you can chart your own course.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Molly Keener

Molly Keener

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Wake Forest University Libraries
Molly Keener consults on copyright and author rights management issues for scholarly projects and products. She assists faculty in understanding their intellectual property rights as content creators, and in assessing rights and permissions when projects incorporate others’ copyrighted works. She also assists in understanding funder compliance policies for publications and data.
avatar for Heather Morrison

Heather Morrison

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa - School of Information Studies
The knowledge commons: a collective sharing of all of humankind's knowledge that places the public good and the needs of scholarship at the centre. The knowledge commons is free of charge for anyone to read (open access), except where there are other public good imperatives such as protection of personal privacy. All who are qualified are welcome to contribute to the knowledge commons. | | Friday's lively lunch will focus on one of the... Read More →


12:45pm

How Do We Report and Manage eBooks in Academic Libraries?
Many libraries include eBooks in their catalog and book holdings, and report those holdings on “about the library” pages and to reporting agencies such as ACRL. Is it reasonable to report eBooks in the same way as physical holdings that libraries own and librarians can point to on a shelf? Yes, because users have access to them? Or no, because that access may be ephemeral (we are thinking particularly of large leased collections or PDA/DDA collection). Does reporting eBook collections artificially inflate library holdings? Should we differentiate “owned” eBooks, “leased” eBook collections and print books on holdings reports?

Publishers can add or withdraw titles from collections without notice, with no input from individual library subject selectors. What does that mean in term of permanent access and relevance to college curricula? What about uniqueness of library collections? How can vendors assist librarians in their selection and ordering process to reduce duplicate purchasing of content already owned or available via subscriptions or PDA/DDA. What about eBooks available to patrons via a consortium arrangement? How do we “weed” eBooks?

Finally, how students view the book chapters online? Do they treat these as journals or are they aware that these are coming from books.

We will share ideas from a librarian and vendor perspectives – but what are your thoughts? How do you handle and report eBooks and eBook records?

Speakers
SK

Sulekha Kalyan

Head of Acquisitions / Associate Professor, Seton Hall University
avatar for Lisa Rose-Wiles

Lisa Rose-Wiles

Science Librarian / Associate Professor, Seton Hall University
Lisa Rose-Wiles is the Science Librarian at Seton Hall University Libraries in South Orange, New Jersey.  She holds an MLS from Rutgers University and a PhD in Biological Anthropology from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to moving into the library field, Lisa conducted field research on capuchin monkeys in Costa Rica, Argentina and Suriname. Her current research focuses on scholarly communication and usage patterns of library... Read More →
avatar for Steve Sutton

Steve Sutton

Regional Sales Manager/New York, Subscription Services Division & GOBI Library Solutions, EBSCO Information Services
Steve has over thirty years’ experience working with academic libraries helping to create cost effective strategies for selecting, ordering, receiving, and cataloging print and digital content. He has worked closely with collection development staff in over one hundred libraries to help build their print collections through approval plans. Steve has held various sales and sales management positions in a number of established and start-up... Read More →


12:45pm

How to Tweak - Or Maybe Completely Overhaul - an Approval Plan
Franklin & Marshall College is a small undergraduate institution with a FTE of approximately 2,400 students. The library has been using a university press (mostly) approval plan with YBP since the 1990s and the time has come to reconsider the parameters of the current plan. Two subject-specific plans are working well but the larger plan is bringing in titles that are out of scope for the college’s curriculum.

Using the Franklin & Marshall College example, this presentation will discuss the approval plan revision process. Various methods will be highlighted, as well as local and vendor-supplied resources to facilitate designing the best plan for your library.


Some Items that will be discussed:

Current concerns

Possible solutions

The process

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Adams

Patricia Adams

Sr Collection Development Manager, YBP Library Services
Former academic acquisitions and serials librarian currently specializing in monographic acquisitions and collection development, including print and ebook approval plans, demand-driven acquisitions, workflow support and simplification.
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Thomas Karel

Collection Management Librarian, Franklin & Marshall College
I have been an academic librarian for 37 years, working in reference, government documents, and collection development. Since 1995 I have also been an adjunct faculty member in Drexel University's library and information science program.


12:45pm

If Students Were Cats: Understanding the Different Breeds at Your Institution
Trying to increase awareness and utilization of your resources and services? A recent survey done by Cengage Learning said that 75% of college students say they wish they took more advantage of the library and its resources; yet, 70% of them do not ask their campus librarians for help with course assignments. This lively lunch will feature a User Experience Specialist demonstrating how to use thumbnail personas and Agile story mapping techniques. These methods are a quick and easy way to help ensure library programs and services hit the mark with students, faculty, and stakeholders alike. Librarians will be coached in how to build personas that can be used to better understand their faculty and students’ individual needs and gain the knowledge to map out different student types and more easily create targeted “library playbooks” that cover various groups of student learning styles. The tools will also assist in prioritization of the many different student types and faculty groups with whom librarians engage. Coming out of this lively lunch, librarians will have the basic information they need to begin to build personas that can be implemented in marketing the library, making improvements to their web site, and building out internal materials to train staff, all in an effort to maximize the library’s resources and services in a thoughtful and strategic manner.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Moran

Carrie Moran

User Engagement Librarian, University of Central Florida
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Kyle Stewart

User Experience Specialist, Gale, Cengage Learning
My path into UX started with Anthropology and Journalism, where my love of interviewing people turned into a career. I have a Master in IT Management, focusing quantitative data analysis and management. I try to merge the qualitative research with quantitative data to get a better picture of what the users are actually doing, and what they need to succeed.



12:45pm

Libraries as a core part of teaching and learning – dream or reality?
Every academic year, instructors in universities and colleges around the world create resource lists for their courses. Their students are often expected to use and source additional resources beyond such lists, for example by using discovery tools. Librarians, who have the expertise to provide support for these tasks, are however often not involved and these activities are therefore rather disintegrated and inefficient.

This session takes a closer look at the role of the library in teaching and learning within both virtual and physical environments. Synergies between students’ and instructors’ tasks and the services which the library can provide for them, such as discovery and acquisition of resources, will be explored. We will also share ideas for cross functional and automated workflows to streamline the different tasks and discuss how we can provide tools for engaging resource lists that do not only provide the students with pre-selected items for a course, but also encourage the use of additional library assets and support a process of discovery, collaboration and knowledge creation. We aim for a lively discussion and contributions from the audience throughout the presentations.

Speakers
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Associate Dean, Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer, University of Oklahoma
Carl Grant is the Associate Dean for Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer at the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Carl has an extensive background in the information industry and has worked for many years in the corporate enterprise that supports library services in leadership positions at Ex Libris, VTLS, Ameritech Library Services, and Innovative Interfaces.
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Christine Stohn

Senor Product Manager, Discovery & Delivery, Ex Libris
Christine Stohn is a senior product manager in the Discovery and Delivery business unit at Ex Libris, including Primo and bX. Christine has over 20 years of experience in the library industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. Christine holds a degree in library sciences from the Free University in Berlin and an information systems degree from the Open University in the UK.


12:45pm

Libraries in a Bind: Practical Solutions and Human Responses to a Weeding Mandate
Many university libraries are currently engaged in major weeding projects as they reduce their print book collections to make room for new space configurations to accommodate emerging library trends such as makerspaces and transitioning toward a predominately e-book collection. To address such a deselection project effectively requires both practical solutions and tact in dealing with faculty who seriously value their collection of print books. Librarians from two universities will share practical approaches to managing a large weeding project and for dealing diplomatically with book users affected. Representatives for deselection project services will also offer insights into their logistic support for handling the weeding project. Ample time will be provided for discussion where collection librarians can candidly discuss both the practical problems and user concerns faced when sandwiched between the demands of a major weeding project and the needs of faculty and students in book-reliant disciplines.

Speakers
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Carla Caforio

Library Relocation Specialist, William B. Meyer
Over twenty years of experience providing relocation, depository and customized technology solutions to libraries in transition.
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Kathy Marks

Strategic Sales Director-Libraries, Better World Books
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Christina Mayberry

Collection Development Coordinator, Oviatt Library of California State University-Northridge
avatar for Alex McAllister

Alex McAllister

Humanities Librarian, Appalachian State University
avatar for Allan Scherlen

Allan Scherlen

Social Sciences Librarian, Appalachian State University
Allan Scherlen is the collections management librarian for the social sciences at Appalachian State University, Boone, NC. Allan has published articles on various issues related to publishing, open access, and international librarianship in International Information and Library Review, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, Serials Review, Serials Librarian, Public Libraries, and North Carolina Libraries. He was also the co-editor of the... Read More →


12:45pm

Managing, Marketing, and Measuring Open Resources
Librarians from the University of Florida will lead a discussion on the many opportunities and challenges that academic libraries face in managing, marketing, and measuring open resources. Open resources includes traditional open access journals and books, as well as media and curricular materials often referred to as Open Educational Resources (OERs). There are many questions that come up when incorporating open resources into an academic library collection. How do libraries review, select, and organize quality open access resources for inclusion in the collection? What tools and practices are used to manage electronic access? How can libraries better market open resources to faculty? How can libraries assess usage and the impact open resources have on instruction and research? This session is intended to serve as a forum to sharing ideas and best practices around practical solutions to these questions. Audience participation is highly encouraged. Discussion prompts will be presented via a slideshow. Attendees can expect to learn about some of the issues surrounding open resources, how libraries of different sizes have approached these challenges, and what solutions have been found (or not!).

Speakers
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Steve Carrico

Acquisitions Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
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Ann Lindell

Head, Architecture & Fine Arts Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

E-Resources Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
I am the E-Resources & Acqusitions Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. I have been with the Smathers Libraries since 2010, and in my current role since 2012. I received my MLS from the University of South Florida in 2009. My primary research focus is cost, use, and usage studies of e-resources, particularly pertaining to data driven decision making. I am also interested in acquisition/e-resource workflow... Read More →



12:45pm

One Size Does NOT Fit All: Assessing and Choosing Acquisition Models for Streaming Video
Perpetual rights or annual subscription? Whole collection or single titles? PDA or EBA?

Librarians are facing changes in the streaming video environment from three directions—along with increased demand and growth in the amount available content, there are more and more acquisition models. How does a library think through all the models and make a decision?

The librarian’s view: There are a number of factors you consider when looking at the choices. What’s your collection development vision? What acquisition model works with your budget? Is perpetual access important to you, or can your environment make an adjustment when rights are inevitably lost so that a film is pulled from a subscription? Are your academic programs stable, or do your needs change often? The various acquisition models address these and other criteria differently, and no one model serves all needs.

The vendor’s view: What the vendor offers will reflect the outcome of complex negotiations with the rights holder, or information provider (IP). For example, one IP might agree to include its content in collections but not in PDA. Another might agree to subscriptions but not to perpetual acquisitions.

Please join us to hear academic librarians from Cornell, University of Central Florida, and Arizona State University explain how they’re sorting through the choices, experimenting, evaluating results, and making decisions—following a short introduction by Alexander Street. Our aim is for you to leave with a clear roadmap, so that you can tailor a fit that’s just right for your library.

Speakers
avatar for deg farrelly

deg farrelly

Media Librarian, Arizona State University Libraries
With 40 years experience as a media librarian deg farrelly provides a unique perspective on video in academic libraries. He is the author of “Streaming Video” in the book Rethinking Collection Development and Management, (published by ABC-Clio) and co-investigator in the 2013 and 2015 national surveys of academic library streaming video. (Results of the 2013 survey presented at the Charleston Conference and published in Against the... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Koennecke

Jesse Koennecke

Director, Acquisitions & E-Resource Licensing Services, Cornell University
Ask me about Battledecks@ER&L!
avatar for Eileen Lawrence

Eileen Lawrence

Senior Vice President, Alexander Street
I'm passionate about food (vegan), music (opera), theatre (put me in New York), friends (are family), and work (a happy addict). Passionate about new Alexander Street projects -- food studies; 20th-century Islam; disabilities; social work; borders and migration; classical scores (1.3 million pages!); human rights; more theatre and dance videos; more in counseling and therapy; more in anthropology, including a cool field-notes project. Excited... Read More →


12:45pm

Open Perspectives on Open Access: Realities of Commercial Publishing
Librarians are responsible for providing access to information; commercial publishers are responsible for providing information to access. How does this dichotomy succeed in the reality of open access? What issues cause this dichotomy, and how can cooperative success be achieved?
This Lively Lunch presents issues for discussion to further necessary cooperation among librarians and commercial publishers. Open Perspectives for discussion:
Why is open access necessary for commercially-published serials?
 Relationship to institutional repositories
 Predatory open access journals
Does open access negatively affect the quality of scholarly content?
 “Information wants to be free”: The necessity of peer-review, editors, editorial boards
 Tenure and promotion pertaining to publication requirements
 Author rights in concert with open access and commercial publishing
Collection development budgets versus commercial publisher revenue
 Open access and cost savings for libraries
 Impact of open access commercial publishing on revenue and productivity
 The reality of monopolistic practices and predatory pricing
What are the true impacts of open access mandates, gold versus green options, and APC requirements on libraries and commercial publishers?
Facilitator: Dr. Gary Pitkin, former library dean, editor of three commercially-published journals, author, consultant. Panelists: Dr. Marta Deyrup, Professor Seton Hall University, LITA acquisitions editor, editorial board member/peer-reviewer, author, consultant; George Machovec, Executive Director Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, editorial board member, author, consultant; Stacy Sieck, Library Communications Manager for the Americas, Taylor and Francis; Tony Roche, Publishing Director, Emerald Group Publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Marta Deyrup

Marta Deyrup

Librarian and Professor, Seton Hall University
Marta Deyrup is Professor and Head of Technical Services at Seton Hall University Libraries in South Orange, New Jersey. She holds a MLS from Rutgers University and a PhD from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Columbia University.
GM

George Machovec

Executive Director, Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries
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Gary Pitkin

Editor/consultant, GMP Associates


Friday November 6, 2015 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Playing with Fire – Why Publishers Leave the Big Deal

While librarians always had an ambiguous relationship with the big deal, publishers have been very satisfied with its economic outcomes. The move to database-deals, encompassing ejournals, ebooks, and databases, pushes the boundaries even further – offering libraries unprecedented discounts while locking them in into high volume, multi-year deals.

What has been overlooked though is the impact the big deal had on the relationship between major publishers offering distribution services to smaller publishers and even more so to learned societies.

The presentation describes the effect for libraries, societies, and publishers, particularly their ability to make economically sensible decisions in the context of the big deal versus an independent distribution and services organization.   


Speakers
avatar for Sven Fund

Sven Fund

Managing Director, FullStopp Society for Digitality


12:45pm

Print & E-Books Use in Tandem – Dialogue on the Implications for Library Collections and Publisher Programs
Print and e-books share the same ecosphere and therefore not only compete to meet readers’ needs but also complement one another. Moreover, the interactions between the two formats have profoundly differential impacts on print circulation and e-books usage as well as affect how all monographs are used. What librarians and publishers are learning about the influence of e-books on their print counterparts in particular has major implications for building collections and publishing monographs.

Drawing from their respective experiences at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries and Oxford University Press (including their multi-year participation in the Triangle Research Libraries Network program for wholesale acquisition/vending of both print and e-books), this dialogue between a librarian and publisher highlights how the two organizations are adjusting to this new book world. In particular the speakers will discuss how changes in library collection strategies are affecting the vending of monographs in tandem with how evolving publishing models are influencing library acquisitions.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Senior Director, Institutional Sales, Americas, Oxford University Press
Rebecca Seger is the Senior Director for Institutional Sales at Oxford University Press USA.  She has been working with libraries for her entire career, currently leading the OUP team that works with, and sells, to all types of libraries and consortia in North and South America.  Rebecca has been with OUP for 14 years, and has focused on the product development, sales and marketing of ebooks, databases and journals to and for the academic and... Read More →
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Luke Swindler

Collections Management Officer, Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Luke Swindler has been working in collections for over three decades. In his current position he has a leading role in analyzing, planning, and managing library collections generally and spearheading e-books initiatives specifically for the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


12:45pm

Road Mapping: Managing Changes in Collection Management
As we transition more of our collections to electronic formats, the staffing levels and job in Collection Management departments are changing. Less print journals mean less need for a staff person to checkin, file and claim issues. Less funds for print books and more electronic book purchases or subscriptions to large packages, means less staff people to handle order requests, process received books and facilitate payments. What about the staff member whose job assignment has eroded or who’s physical ability to perform key parts of their job assignments have diminished over the years? Meanwhile the responsibilities of the department head continues to expand—institutional repositories, databases, interlibrary loan, etc,. In this session, participants will be invited to share their experiences with change management in their departments.

Speakers
avatar for Glenda Alvin

Glenda Alvin

Assistant Director for Collection Management, Tennessee State University
I am Associate Professor at the Brown-Daniel Library, an HBCU in Nashville, TN. My responsibilities include databases, books, serials, cataloging, document delivery and preservation. I also manage the link resolver and the electronic resource management system. My column in Against Grain is entitled, "Collection Management Matters."
avatar for Jack Montgomery

Jack Montgomery

Coordinator of Acquisitions and Collection Services, Western Kentucky University
Jack G. Montgomery was born in Columbia, South Carolina. He earned his B.A. from the University of South Carolina, his MLS at the University of Maryland–College Park in 1987.  First, as a law librarian he worked in acquisitions, serials, and collection development in academic law libraries in Virginia, Ohio, and Missouri. Montgomery then made the transition to the general academic library and to Western Kentucky University in 1998 where he... Read More →



12:45pm

STEAMpunks: How Makerspaces Bring Science to Life
The greatest handicap that education in science, mathematics, and engineering faces today isn’t the difficulty of the subjects or even the unequal access to appropriate learning resources: it is lack of engagement. Too many students see science and math as irrelevant to their daily experience, and can only relate to them as passive consumers of technology.

The revolutionary rise of Makerspaces in libraries promises to change that. 3D printers, programmable lathes, and modular electronics make it easy even for the inexperienced to turn creative inspirations into useful, beautiful inventions they can share with others. For educators, the Makerspaces offer unique hands-on opportunities to show how knowledge of science and math can enrich students’ lives and to break down unnecessary barriers that isolate artistic imaginations from technical interests and skills (and vice versa).

John Rennie, editorial director of McGraw-Hill Education’s AccessScience, will lead this panel of Makerspace innovators and leading librarians as they discuss how best to encourage curiosity-driven STEAM learning for lifelong benefits.

Speakers
avatar for John Burke

John Burke

Library Director & Principal Librarian, Miami University Middletown
John J. Burke is the author of the Neal-Schuman Library Technology Companion (ALA, 2016) and Makerspaces: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014). His scholarship centers on makerspaces, LMS embedded librarianship, and technology for library staff. John is the Director of the Gardner-Harvey Library on the Middletown regional campus of Miami University (Ohio). John is a past president of the Academic Library Association of... Read More →
avatar for Sharona Ginsberg

Sharona Ginsberg

Learning Technologies Librarian, SUNY Oswego
Sharona Ginsberg is the founder and coordinator of MakerBridge, an online community for all makers but especially focused on librarians and educators. Currently, she is employed as Learning Technologies Librarian at SUNY Oswego. She is a 2015 Library Journal Mover & Shaker and has a master’s degree in library science from the University of Michigan School of Information.
avatar for John Rennie

John Rennie

Editorial Director, AccessScience, McGraw-Hill Education
John Rennie is a science writer, editor, and lecturer based in New York. Viewers of The Weather Channel know him as the host of the original series Hacking The Planet and co-host of the hit special The Truth About Twisters. He is also the editorial director of science for McGraw-Hill Education, overseeing its highly respected AccessScience online reference and theMcGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology.


12:45pm

The Charlotte Initiative on eBook Principles: A Mellon Funded Project -- Q&A Session for Publishers, Aggregators and Librarians

Principal Investigator Chuck Hamaker and the UNC Charlotte based project team have assembled a Working Group of twenty participants representing library consortia, publishers, content aggregators, and academic libraries.  In this session I’ll give an overview of the project and describe the scope of the publisher and vendor environmental scan.  Please come with your questions and ideas.

As a Mellon supported project, our focus is the humanities and humanistic social sciences.  We will discuss, define and investigate the impact on academic institutions of three principles for eBook licenses:

 

  1. Unlimited simultaneous users
  2. No Digital Rights Management (DRM) either contractual or technological
  3. Irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights

 

We have formed three research teams to explore licensing terms, user experience and the impact of DRM, and classroom and instruction use. The fourth component is an iterative environmental scan of the eBook market, which is a major part of my role as Project Consultant.  We will share information throughout the remaining 18 months of effort. The project will conclude with a free conference in Charlotte in Spring 2017.


Speakers
avatar for October Ivins

October Ivins

Principal and Consultant, Ivins eContent Solutions
October was an academic librarian for 20 years at UNC and LSU, and was an executive at two Boston area publishing services dot coms.  She is an independent consultant to publishers and other content providers, associations, libraries, and consortia.  Projects typically include market research, product and license development, pricing, and/or marketing strategy.  She earned both BA and MLS degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill and completed PhD coursework...