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Friday, November 6 • 2:25pm - 3:10pm
Why Academic Libraries Should Consider Collecting Self-Published Works

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Academic libraries should consider collecting self-published (indie) materials since some include appropriate information of potential value to faculty and students. Beyond the stigma of pre-Internet vanity presses, these books account for between 50 and 75 percent of all titles published in the United States, usually as e-books or print-on-demand. An industry has evolved to support these publications. Public libraries are already encountering public requests, mostly for fiction. Reasons for their collection by academic libraries include: (1) importance as source material for current historical events or local history; (2) the documentation of popular culture trends, some not suitable for commercial publication, such as Holocaust denial, anti-vaccination advocacy, and non-mainstream sexual practices; (3) earlier works by currently popular authors; (4) research from independent scholars for narrow topics not viable for commercial publication or when the author wants complete control; (5) inexpensive self-published textbooks to meet one of the most important unmet information needs for students. Finally, major research libraries should evaluate self-published works in areas where their goal is to collect comprehensively. Currently, statistics from vendors show that libraries are not collecting self-published works extensively and are mostly purchasing publications by campus community authors.

Speakers
BH

Bob Holley

Professor Emeritus, Wayne State University
Professor Emeritus, Wayne State University School of Library & Information Science. Bob Holley has been actively involved in collection development since 1980 as an academic librarian, library science professor, and researcher. He was chief collection development officer at the University of Utah and at Wayne State University. He has taught collection development to hundreds of students both in the classroom and online in the Wayne State... Read More →



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