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Thursday, November 5 • 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Facilitating Sharing Among Researchers

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Research is improved when researchers are able to connect with other individuals to share results, concepts, theories, and disagreements. Researchers thrive in an open environment where theories and results are readily available. Researchers are motivated by further scientific discovery, access for their informational needs, and promotion of their own or others' work. Non-researchers also gain expertise and knowledge when they have access to current research. Traditional publishing, however, is a snapshot in time for research results and inherently does not encourage conversations and sharing. With technological and social tools, librarians and publishers can facilitate sharing among researchers and the public. How can publishers and librarians partner to improve collaboration and sharing? This discussion will bring together librarians and publishers for a frank dialogue discussing the values of librarianship in facilitating open access to information and publisher considerations.

Speakers
CU

Clemson University Libraries

Dean of Libraries, Clemson University
Library collaborations | Leadership in libraries and public organizations | Developing and managing library spaces
avatar for Alicia Wise

Alicia Wise

Director of Universal Access, Elsevier
Alicia is very passionate about expanding access to information, and particularly enjoys developing successful partnerships across complex stakeholder communities. Her areas of expertise lie at the intersection of copyright and digital technology. She joined Elsevier in June 2010 to lead the Universal Access team. In this role she is responsible for our access strategy and policies, including open access, and for building relationships with other... Read More →



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